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August 02, 1923 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-02

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eing an authoritive and interE
wide. The only requirement
nowledge of buildings, theirf
ions and their theories, and :a

esting
is a
func-
good

MICHIGAN measure of hospitality.
SION
except Monday Have, yeu ever seen a fellow who
was so anxious to square things up
d Press. The As- With his lady love that he' told some
y entitled top the
1 news dispatches other girl all about his little spat
erwise creditedan "with the love one and then later
ws oubished here- ihtelv n

ffice, A-nt Arbor

:arrier or m
or Press Bui
if signed as
published in
tion of the

ail, $k.So.
iding.
evidence of
The Summer
Editor. U
eive no coil
>e omitted in
writer. The
arily endorse
comlmunica

'found that she was "listening in" on
the extension line?
The friendship which Judge Gary
says exists between the working manx
and prohibition 'certainly may exist
but we doubt if it is mutual.
Henry Ford says, "If I were Presi-
dent ." Yes, if he were Pres-
ident, he'd be sick with' pneumonia.

EDITORIAL STAFF
elephones 2414 and 176-M,.
MANAGING EDITOR
'HOWARD A. DONAHUE
r .............William Stoneman
..... . . . .Paul IL, Einstein
tors.... .. ...Nathan Davis
Robert G. Rainsay.
Assistants
leidemann Ada Phelps (
Geddes Andrew E. Rropper -
gaper Regina Reichmean
Mitts Margaret Stuart
,oran Lucy Tolhurst
yer Matilda Rosenfeld
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 96o
BUSINESS MANAGER
L. BEAUMONT PARKS
g....,...........Hiel M. Rockwell
n .D. L. Pierce
.A. S. Morton
n.. John C. Haskin
Assistants
Bartholomew George Stracke
S. Griffiths John A. Barrett
RSDAY, AUGUST 2, 1923
Editor-NATHAN M. DAVIS
LECTIVE IMMGRATION
w of the many unsatisfactory
n the country's present immi-
system, Secretary of Labor
. Davis, is studying the emi-.
tuation abroad with the inten-
recasting the existing.laws to.
Hcient application. There has
Ich criticism of late against
railing restrictions .on a for-'
flux, but the revision, which
retary plans will in a large
appease thedispleasure of
ho believe we should have no
against European immigra-

eign :
the s
measu

e outstanding feature of his new
sm will, if adopted;, make it pos-
to select only the best qualified
[cants for entrance. While the
ria in distinguishing between
i have not as yet been made
vn, the underlying principle will
v only energetic, intelligent, and
ble individuals., admission. The
sirables, who, although legally
ble for entrance are not the type
lesire most, now get in through
priority of their application, could
rithheld from our country. Cer-
y we have enough problems with
foreignpopulation already.
e very nature of America's hete-
neous citizenship makes it ex-
onally difficult to organize an ef-
ve method for the complete as-
ation of new-comers, particularly,
.e lower classes. Consideration of
applicants apparent adaptability
ew circumstances should be given
le, consideration in formulating
iew standards of selection;
though the gross number of for-
ers admitted to thecountry would
imited to the same extent, as at
present time, our net total in
ble individuals would be even
ter than under the unlimited con-
ns which prevailed before the
Nothing can contribute more to
nation's future than, a good;
hy, and reliable foreign element,
h though limited in number, bears
ite possibilities in strength and
e all, a love of the United States.
CAMPUS GUIDES
is is the kind of weather that in-
s "wanderlust" 'and hundreds 'of
st scrank up the old car and
w the call of the open road. In
r words, it -is touring time and
y strangers' puass through Ann
r ddaily. The fame of the Univer-
naturally enough, makes' them
e on thei rjourney and spend a
hours in looking over places of
rest. HoweVer, it, is Po. easy
er for a total , stranger to "go'
rounds" and take away with him
asing and comprehensiveglimpse
e University.
is in this situation that the
opus guides" fill a much needed
,. In many schools an organized
im of campus guides has been in-
ted and strangers are placed un-
a guide for a complete tour of the
y1 grounds. It hardly seems ne-

YESTERDAY
What's Wrong With the Country?
James Hamilton Lewis, former sen-
ator: from Illinois, makes a few re-
marks about .political parties that are
worth hearing:
"The two old parties'"hereafter will
bear their names only," says Lewis.
"People don't vote for a party or a
man any longer. They vote against
somebody or something. Elections to-
day are merelya voice against fancied
'or real agricultural or financial or
industrial evils. ,If the farmer can't
sell his crops he votes against the ad-
ministration. If the worker can't get
a job or the cost of living won't per-
mit the saving of money he votes
against the party in power, If taxes
are high and income schedules, irk-
some the financial; or' business made
says it is time to change his politics.
There seems to be a great deal of
truth in what the former senator says.
Voters do not seem to vote for some-
thing or- somebody as much as they
vote against. In other words they are
usually asking for the destruction or
mitigation of some real or facied evil
without giving much thought as to how
'the evil is to be removed and what is
to take its: place. Destructive and
not constructive platforms seem to
catch the popular vote.,
Henry Ford, interviewed for Col-
lien's Weekly by ,Charles W. Wood,
asks three questions before he at-
tempts to divulge what he would do if
he were president:
(1) What do the people of the Un-
ited States think they want?
(2) What do they really want?
(3) Exactly what is wrong with the
country, anyway?
We would suggest that the person
who can give us the answers to these
questions should. receive the peace
prize. If anyone knew the fine divid-
ing line between just what people
think they want and what they really
want, and if the fortunate person
were willing to tell the world, he.
would go a long way toward insuring
peace. Yes, and'Just what is wrong
with the country, anyway?
Let Her Jin!
Still adhering to the traditional ex-
clusion of women from their Law
school, Columbia university is now be-
sieged with a score or more petitions
from various civic organizations. ask-
ing for the admittance 'of women to
that branch of the university in the
future. Reminding the trustees that
our womanhood has already assumed
a prominent. position in legal affairs
of many states, the National League
of Women Voters asks that the bar-
riers which have long since been lift-
ed from other departments be done
away. with in legal' inistruction as
well.
Restrictions against creed, race, and
sex were all-important rules of the
"old Columbia" but have no place
there now. Women are privileged to
practice over the supreme courts of
our states, and still are denied ad-
mittance to one of the best law schools
in the country- How can such a cir-
cumstance continue if the so-called
"weaker-sex" is to be given the priv-
ileges which are rightfully hers?
Who Fooled Cock-RobinI
Vusually one con accredit in Si.
complished artist of the calibre of
Irene Castle Treman with at.least a

speaking knowledge of French, but it
seems that the beautiful bob-haired
danseuse didn't understand juWt whAt
took place in the little court room of
the Seine tribunal on Thursday, July,
12. She was granted her petition for
divorce but still on her arrival in
New York insisted that she was still
the wife of Robert Treman.
Maybe the lady, merely desired to
avoid publicity in the action, then
again maybe it was only profession-
al ethics which prormted her to deny

utation of her profession. 'We really
wouldn't have cared even if she didn't
get the divorce but someone more in-
teremed certainly desired a reliable
account of the business.
TAKE
SNEEZO SNUFF
IN A PINCH
Chemically,Speaking-
The attempted oxtordixing of Am-
erican universities is causing the heat'
custompary with all such experiments.
In Jfact it has been ascertained
that a large amount of hot air is ac-
companying the attempted transform-
ation.
Several undesirable elements can-
not be eliminated from the mix-up.
There is a rumpor of a patent in-
fringement, it being claimed that Har-
vard has' the'-sole American rights on
the process.
-L. M.S.
8ig Fish Caught Recently I'
Poedunck, Aug. 2.-(by A & P)-
Exry Jenks, of this city, caught a six
pund prickly perch today which, it is
alleged, has two wisdom teeth. The
specimen was examined by Dr. Will
Buzzer who told the A & P reporter
that the perch must have acquired the
two wisdom teeth from being head
of a school of fish or sump'n.
TARN .
EDITORIAL COMMENT
THE APOCALYPSE' OF GER1IANY
(New York Times)
Truly horrible is the prophecy. of
Count Harry Kessler regarding the
fate ,awaiting Europe unless the Un-
ited'States takes the side of Germany.
He pictures the Russian hordes gal-
loping westward over the plains 'of
Europe to bring imperialist France to
judgment; nation will war against na-
tion, race against race, and there will
be an end of European civilization for
all time. This new day, like "Der
Tag" of 1014, is at hand, but it is one
demanding even more gloomy words
than those of the prophet Zephaniah
describing the Judgment of Judah:
"That day is a day of wrath, a .day ofj
trouble and distress, a day of waste-
ness and desolation, a day of darkness
and gloominess, a day of clouds and
thick darkuess, a day of the trumpet
and alarm against the fenced cities
and the high towers-" Count Harry's
! day is all this, and more for it is the
day of judgment in which France will
be sorely punished for her sins.
Nor does the count hesitate to fore-
cast' details: Germany, in fulfillment
of her oft-;epeated promise, will go
Bolshevist 'as the zero hour strikes.
Promptly, France, insane with the lust
of world dominion, and eager to create
new Alsace-Lorraines, -will occupy
the entire North of Germany. 'There-
upon, Russia, incensed beyond an
durance at French rapacity, will at-
tack Poland. The dogs of war being
thus let loose, the world will expire
crying "Havoc!" in a Slavic'tongue.
The one thing that can alone forestall
this calamity is for tife United States
to come to the rescue. The Count re-
minds us that in 1917 the United States
made the mistake, of going in on the
wrong side, and, with tender solici-
tude for our nation's future, he im-
plies that we would do well to profit,

from that error. There would, have
been, he points out, a very different
peace had we bilked the Allies-a
peace which he modestly asserts
would have lasted several genrations
at least. .
There is, something wopderfully fa-
miliar about all this. It is miuch like
the portentous warnings of German
spokesmen in 1916, who pictured
Russia breaking away from: the Allies
(as she did a yea' later) and siding
with Germany (as' she forgot to do)
and with Japan, and then, woe to the
world, for the combination would be
invincible. Then, as now, they warn-
ed us that we must force the Allies to
accept the German peace terms or else
be responsibe for the blood of Eu-
rope.
In one important respect the count
is at odds with prominent German
supporters in America who, like him-
self, viewed with alarm the Russian
horde. 'They pointed out that Ger-
many alone stood between Russia and
France, and that it therefore behoov-
ed the French to 'save Germany .so
as to preserve it as a buffer between
themselves and those awful Cossack
'horsemen- Apparently, Count Harry
is not quite so unselfish, nor. it he
quite, so solicitous for France's mil-
itary defenses. The willingness of
the Germans, however, to side with
or against the Russians is another ev-
idence of' Germany's plastic com-
plaisance. If we are to believe every-

said for her, she will do anything un-
'"r the sun that is asked of her-any-
thing, that is, except come to terms
with the French.
Look over the values in the classI-
feds.-Adv.x
The way to rent a room is with a
"Daily Classified".-Aav.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
ANN ARBOR TIME TABLE
Eastern Standard Time
(Effective July 10, 1923)
Limited am] Express Cars to Detroit.
-6:0o a.m., 7:oo a.m., S :00 a.m., 9:05
a.m. and hourly until 9:o5 p.m.
LimitedCars to Jackson-8:47 a.m.,
10:47 ~fh 12:47 p.m., .2:47 P.m., 4:47
p.m., 6:47 p m., 8:47 p.m.
Express Cars to Jackson (Local stops
west of Anti Arbor)-g :47 a.m. and
every two hours until' 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars to 'Detroit--7 :oo a.ml.,
8:55 a.m. and every two hours until
8:SS p.m., 11 :oo p.m., To Ypsilanti
0 1y-_ 1:4oP.m,,-"1:15 a.m.
Local Cars to Jackson.--7.4o a.m.
and then 12:10 taim.
Connection made at Ypsilanti to
Saline and at Wayne to xymouth and
Northville.
F 0aD always tafes
much better if the
surroundings are right.
There is no pleasanter
place in Ann Arbor in
which to ea t than
TUTTLE'S LUNCH
ROOM
MAYNARD STREET

Gs
GRAHAMS-Both Ends of the fliagonal
4'-

II Text Books and Supplies for All Colleges

i
i

We carry a complete line of

HARDWARE AND PAINTS.

We have glass and we do sheet metal work, In short it
is always the best ide t to call us up and get our price on
any work before going ahead. The difference in price is
as apparent as is the fine quality of our work.
SCHLENKER'S HARDWARE
21,3 Wr5T LISP. TY t

.1

I ___ __

a.

F 04

HOTO

Cool Drinks
709 U. University

MA ACK
Wolf Lake Mochigan's
most delightful Summer
. : Resort : :
An Ideal Place
To spend a day or week-end
or to get a
,Frogand Chicken
Dinner
A pleasant motor trip of 28 miles from
Ann Arbor. Take highway M-17 to
Grass Lake, Passing thru. turn left 4i1-2
miles (foIlowinz signs) to Mack Island.
Vathing, 21oating, Fish-
inDancing
New Dinner-dance room miay be
engaged by private parties, Reserva-
'tions for dinners may be made by tele-
phone.
WILLIAM K. McINTYRE, Prop
GRASS LAKE

-,amp, UPI"

. 1 ll1 l11111111111111111111iiigrrlltrrr 1111ll 1111t11 liil11111111
TODAY TH RU SATURD
PEP A ND PV7NCH GA
JO H NNY HiNI
- IN
HIS LATEST AND GREATEST,'
ROBERT EDESON CH AR LI
- HARRY FRASER POLLY ?
VIOLET MERSEREAU
- A New Century Comedy.

1H1[i

I -

AY

LLORE I
IES

W.K
WITH

E MURRAY
MORAN
tS5

1

$ .00

"Tired Business Men"-
Brain Workers-Try Thi

Or More
FOR YOUR
OLD

t1-~
I~ ;k

T LUNCH tomorrow
eliminate meat and
eat ice cream. It's
cooling and contains all the
nourishment you need.
There won't be a trace of
that familiar lay-down-on-
the-job afternoon feeling
wh i ch accompanies too
heavy eating.
But watch your step!
Go where they serve Con-
nor's; it contains the' best,
most nourishing ingredi-
ents and is absolutely pure.

PEN

On any
WATERMAN,
CONKLIN,
SheafIer,

I

Add to yor family's
health and happlness
by taking\hon often
a brick of Connor's
in the sanitary carton

I

.w,

Always demand
CONNOk'S by
name. It's good
health insurance

Parker,
Moore, Duin
or, other pen
In my stock.
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
The Typewriter and Stationery
Store
OPEN EVENINGS

NEXT,
SUJNDAY
SPE+CIAL BRICK

I

-0-

Chocolate
Pineapple Sherbet
Fig Nut
1

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