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July 31, 1923 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

00K TAKES TT Cotton Growers
Seek 40 Millions
LECS H OTo Market Crop

DMER VARSITY CAPTAIN HAS
:iTTLE DIFFICULTY IN TAK-
SING FINAL MATCH
alter K. Wcsbrook, '22L, is the
ligan state tennis champion for
fourth time. Wesbrook won the
Sunday afternoon by defeating
z Bastian, of Indianapolis, in four
4-6, 6-3, 6-2. Only in the first set"
fla-stian at all threatening and
only until Wesbrook was warm-
ip. At the net Bastain appeared
ave a slight advantage over Wes-
k, but iin. the back court. and
ral all-round play Wesbrook was

k

THOMAS AIDSFLINT
IN PLANNING STI
NEW HIGH SCHOOL WILL
IDEAL CAMPUS; HAS Al
OF 57 ACRES
L. D. Thomas, superinten
Ferry field, has returned fro
where he has been assisting
planning of the athletic plant
new high school in that city.
According to Mr. Thomas, th
which has a campus of 57 ac
the best possibilities for an
field and stadium that he h
seen.. The campus is the forn
of a sanitarium, with a heavy
of trees and shrubbery whi
been left intact for many year
new building has been comple
the construction of the athle
is now in progress.
Mr. Thomas will returnt

OA
REA
dent
)m FL
in t
for t
e scho
,res, h
athle
as ev
mer s
grow
ch ha
rs. T
ted a
tic fhe
to Fl

later, probably in company with Coach Fire and Fire Fighting"; and on July auspices of the Hubhard
Fielding H. Yost, to give further ad- 23, Professor Brumm, of the journal- munity league.
vice in the building of the field and ism department, spoke to the Rural The last lecture of th
stadium. Chautauqua near Tawas City, on "The ranted by the Extension
Escape from the Commonplace." DW given by Prof. G. R. S
j j . A lecture entitled "What Modern Latin OFpartment, who
VE Science Tells Us About Our Teeth," ti Inteinational Chauta
LI LI UI UIiUwill beNdelivered by Dr. R. W. Bunt- I1.y .-t Lake Orion, Aug.
ing dental college, at the Bay View Noteng more will be
Chautauqua, on Aug. 16. d ar;ent until next O
of "Making a Man," will be the subject It:e unstomary comprehe
int BUNTING, LASHER ,AND SWAIN TO of a lecture to be given by G. Starr ,of le, ,ii es throughout ti
he SPEAK IN MICHIGAN TOWNS Lasher at Hubbard take uder the [e rianged.
he DURING AUGUST
ol, The University Extension division.
as has had but little on its program this
tic summer with the exception oftwo lec- -. -
ver tures in July and three which are to
ite be given ;the latter part of Augu t. Ar-"
th rangements' have been made for these
ve five lectures only because they have NOW PLAYING
he been especially requested.
nd On July 10, Prof. B. A. Soule, of the A PLAY MADE BY THE
ld chemistry department, lectured to the= DIRECTOR OF "HUMORESQUE"
Michigan State Fire department at I =
int Grand Haven on "The Chemistry of
"CHILDREN Of DUS
with JOHNNIE WALKER
PAULINE GARON
Toa- _LLOYD HUGHES
Owen Moore in AND A NEW to
"THE CHICKEN IN THE CASE" MERMAID COMEDY "THREE STRII<
Lee Moran in "THE NOME PLATE"
Wed.-Thurs.-
William Favershamn in CO1ING T
"THE MAN WHO LOST HIMSELF" THURSDAY J n linOt
Bert Roach in "WON'T YOU WORRY?"
Fri.-Sat.- IN A MILE A MINUTE COMEDY
Constance Talmadge in .: .
"A LADY'S NAME'' . :.: L U C K '.'..
Jack Coop 'r in "SWEET AND PRETTY"

Wesbrook captained the Varsity
eam in 1921 and was Conference
ingles champion for two years. He
oached the Varsity tennis squad in
.922.
RDAI
AmerIcan League
New York 5, Chicago 3.
Washington 1, Detroit 0.
Cleveland 5-2, Boston 4-0.
St.' Louis 5-4, Athletics 2-2.
National League :
New York 17-4, Pittsburg 2-5
Cincinnatti 5-7, Phillies 4-5.
Brooklyn 6, St. Louis 5.
Boston. 6, Chicago 5.
Find that lost pin through the clas-
ied Ad" will find it for you.-Adi.
No Lectures9
No Written Work
At Babson Institute they make a
business of teaching business to'
college trained men who wish to
fill positions of responsibility and
and trust without spending years at
routine work.
Standard office equipment through-
oat. No classes or lectures, but a
business schedule of work from 8:30
to 5:00 o'clock, including daily con-
ferences directed by men with years
of business experience, and discus-
sions with active factory and office
executives at their plants. This re-
moves the instruction from the hypo-
thetical stage and helps the student
to look at things in the same light as
a man actually engaged in business.
Babson Institute, an educational In-
stitution endowed for the purpose of
fitting menfor executive responsi-
bilities, invites you to send for the
booklet, "Training for Business
Ladership." Write today.
Babson Institute
Wellesley Hills, (Subr o) Mass.

' : :d:
1 '4
a

S

Col. Sloan Simpson
Col,. Sloan Simpson, former Texas
cowpuncher, is in New York to nego-
tiate a $40,000,000 loan to aid Texas
cotton growers to market their crop
on a co-operative plan through the
Texas Farm Bureau Cotton associa-
tion.

3
3
y

today-
Lupino Lane in
"A FRIENDLY HUSBAND "
Paul Parrot in
"THE UNCOVERED WAGON"
Wed.-Thurs.-
"JANE EYRE" with Mabel Bailin
Joe Rock Comedy
Fri.-Sat.-
Tom Mix in
"ROMANCE LAND"
Stan Laurel in "CUfFS and COI.LARS"

E,
"We
es

Health Notes'

I

I

I

_a '...,.I

I=

Classified Advetsig
Rates: Two cents per word
per day, paid In advance; fif-
teen cents per reading line per
day, charged. '
FOR SALE
TYPEWRITERS
Typewriters of standard makes
bought, sold,rented, exchanged,
cleaned. and- repaired.,
0. D. MORRILL -b
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 1718
1-tfr
FOR SALE-Five sectional bookcases
with base and top. 824 Arich St.
33-c
FOR REN T
FOR RENT -- Furnished rooms for'
light house keeping. 710 W. Liberty.
Phone 930-d. 31-2
LOST AND FOUND
LOST--Parker Duo-Fold fountain pen
on campus or State St. last week,.
Reward. Call 1104, Michael. 33-c
LOST-Ring set with two rubies and
two opals. Thursday afternoon. Call
2912. 31-2
LOST-Rider fountain pen, Thursday
afternoon. Name on barrell. Call
Parks, 960 or 558. 31-p-16
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED-Junior male student wants
desirable single room with nearby
garage by Sept. 15. 'Answer imme-
diately. Box C E S., care Daily.
33-p
WILL PERSON who borrowed umbrel- I
la Friday at 5:30 from library re-
turn it to. same, place and avoid!
embarrassment., 32-2
Get goon values cheap, thru the
Classified columns.-Adv.

. .
Proprietors of boarding houses in -
Ann Arbor might very easily better
the sanittary conditions in their es-
tablishments if they would watchtwo
or three conditions which are given
little consideration by the average
proprietor, and which dettermine to a
great extent the health of the board-
ers, according to officials at the Un-
iversity Health service.
From the standpoint of health the
vital features to be watched are safe
milk, healthy food handlers, and prop-
erly cleaned dishes. It is a very excep-
tional dairy from which one might
not get contaminated raw milk at any
tim e, and the only sure remedy against
this danger is to hav. only properly
pasteurized milk. All persons who
handle rood or utensils should be well
in the 'sual sense of the word, and
also in the sense of, their not being
tjealthy carrier:4 cf disease, as the
germs of typhoid fever, diphtheria,
and other contagious diseases may
)ersist in the bodies of persons who
have recovered from the active dis-
ease.
Failure to cleanse dishes properly
after use is a new point to be em-
phasized in the spreading of disease.
Heat is the important factor in clean-
Ing; after the usual washing, dishes
should be boiled for a few minutes to
be safe. The way soda glasses and
spoons are often washed by dashing
them into container of cold or luke-
warm wate, is worse than serving
them to another person without any
washing. Such is one of the several
ways in which exchange of saliva ac-
counts for the spread of disease. In
addition to the usual idea of general
cleanliness, provision should be made
for frequent and easy hand washing
by food handlers; waiters should be
instructed in the strict observance of
the rules of cleanliness; they should
be dismissed for having their fingers
in their mouths, for handling the in-
side of glasses, or for fingering the
parts of silverware which are put into
the mouth.-
Exchange Notes
Wisconsin-Twenty-six young wo-
men from the University of Wisconsin
are expected to attend the central
student conference of the Y. W. C. A.
at Lake Geneva, Aug. 17 to 27.
' The conference is held annually un-
de the leadership of the national
board of the Y. W. G. A. It is de-
voted to lectures and Bible, social, and
international study as well as giving
such attention to hiking, swimming,
canoeing and camp activities. t
Many colleges, together with the
national students' department of the
Y. M. C. A., will send speakers to the
conferences, which is one of the sev-
eral to be held in various parts of the
country during the summer.
Priest Sentenced
Denver, July 28.-Rev. Fr . Grace
Arvada priest, was sentenced to two
years in prison on each of two counts
charging forgery of application-of
liquor permits yesterday. The sent-
ence will run concurrently.
Remember "Jmmie the adtaker's"
.1...>.n ftn - A w .~

"i l

pp //'ftg

III

Real Service Must "Be. Engineered

Many of the men whose names are writ large
in engineering history are design engineers; men
like Westinghouse, Lamme, Stanley, Hodgkin-
son, Tesla, Shallenberger. Their inventions
have the quality of^ usefulness, of reliability, of
productability; which is an involved way, per-
haps, of saying that they have the primary
requisite of all really great inventions:,
Serviceability.}
Engineering history abounds in instances ofr
near-genius that produced no product, and of
great developments that never reached comple-
tion; and most of these instances are explained
by the lack, somewhere in the system, of that.
ability to give real Service.
Service, in a machine or a system, or wherever
you find it, is not there by accident but because
it was incorporated by men who understood
what was required and knew how to provide it.
Much more is required of the designer than
facility in calculation and mastery of theory.
He must have first hand and thorough familiarity
with manufacturing operations and with com-
mercial and operating conditions. It takes more
than mere ingenuity and inventiveness to design
apparatus that will be really serviceable and
will "stay put."X

The design engineer, in the Westinghouse
plan, is responsible for the performance of the
finished product. He cannot possibly have the
proper understanding of operation unless he oper-
ates and tests, unless he spends time and thought
in investigation and study, not in the'laboratory
or drawing room, but, right on the operating
job. Here, most of his ideas will develop; and
here he will see and prepare for all the different
things which the product will later have io
encounter. Then when he comes to put his
creations on paper, his calculations will be
necessary and helpful to check the conclusions
which he has reached, and this right use of them
requires training and a high degree of under-
standing. This proper balance of the physical
and mathematical conception of thingspis what
constitutes engineering judgement.
It should be thoroughly 'understood that the
primary function of the design engineer is the
conception and the production of new or im-
proved apparatus, and familiarity with the
practical is essential to the proper discharge of
this duty.
It is this view of designing that makes this
branch of Westinghouse engineering so impor-
tant, so effective, and so productive of real
developments.

AIestinghouse
ACHIEVEMENT Fs OPPORTUNITY

" .

-JUv.-aalv.

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