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July 31, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

[ICHIG-a

v iL 3

LAIMS GROUP SAILS
TO PRESENT DEMANDS OF U.

-r

RuNP nn States numbered 4154; by 1920, the Let
OPMF T fF gP flo q1number had increased to 16,410. The

SA

S .

ULI LLUI IVIL11 I UI UUIIULU
IS SHOWN_ IN LECTURE"
(Continued from Page One)
for high schools was upheld by a su-
preme court.

enrollment of 202,963 in high schools
in 1890 had reached '2,186,862 in 1920.
The total cost of public high schools
in 1890, was $8,118,520. In 1920, the
cost amounted to $278,118,520.
Social-,No Personal Gain Sought
Up to 1890, continued Professor
Davis, the object of high school at-

Says,

I"

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Salva tio
Bank H

I

clalns commission snapped before sailing. Left to right: Dr. J. H. Jantzen, counsel; Dr. William Keisel-
bach, commissioner; Dr. Karl von Lehwlnski, agent, and Dr. 0. C. Kiep, counsel.
The German representatives on the mixed claims commission, after spending several weeks in Washing-
recently sailed for Germany to present to the home government the cla ims the United States representatives
forward for reparations. A conference on the terms of payment will be held in the near future, after the
nan officials have studied the claims.

"A struggle between the practical tendance was an attempt for individ-
and the academic gro_;s became ap-I uals to gain more personal advantage,
parent," said Professor Davis, "as the bust since 1900, the object has been
influence of universities grew. The one of social betterment,-a continual
people demanded the teaching of book readjustment of an individual to- a
keeping, shorthand, commercial stu ceaselessly changing environment."
dies, agriculture and home econom- "Ilnformat'on plus Ideals", pointed
ics in the schools, so that a school out Professor Davis, "produces the ul-
would educate boys for an imediate timate objectives we should seek in
business life as well as for college. education. These are useful habits
The slogan, "what best fits for col- and skills, practice in thinking, and
lege,. best fits for life," grew out of concepts of method, physical training
this quarrel. and organized play; tastes and ap-
Election System Instituted preciations; initiative; and the will
In 1900, the University of Michi- W serve.
gan went upon a purely elective bas-
is. When the high schools followed Blue-Print Service to Start in Fail
in the adoption of this plan, the Uni- J Blue prints will be made by the
versity thought this system a mis- University after. Nov. 27 in any size.
take, and the present system of 12 or quantity for one cent per square
required hours in each of the three foot or fraction thereof, it was an-
groups was adopted. nounced yesterday. Tracings left in;
When the universities became lib- the office of the secretary of the Un-;
eralized, the high schools followed iversity before noon, after Nov. 27,'
in the liberal movements and present- will be finished the afternoon of the
ly, the high school :was flooded with same day and tracings left late in
people from all walks of life. ' the afternoon will be ready when
That the high school is a tremen- called for the following morning at'
dously powerful institution, holding the office of the secretary.
ten per cent of our population to- Brown prints can be had 24 hours
day, is proved by the comparison of after the tracings are delivered at the
figures between 1890 and 1920. In office of the Secretary of the Univer-
1890, the high schools in the United sity.

George M. Reynolds
"Let Europe worA out its own sal-
vation." That is the advice of George
M. Reynolds, chairman af the board
of directors of the Continental and
Commercial bank of Chicago, recently
returned from a five-month tour of
Europe. He said Europe's trouble
may be laid to lack of political stabil-
ity and confidence.
Look over the values in the classi-
fieds.-Adv. !

DAI OIL
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
[niversity. Copy received in the Office of the Summer Session until
3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturday.)
Volume 3 TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1923 Number 113

r , .

urion No. 11, Wednesday afternoon, August 1:
Ford's River Rouge. Industrial Plants, Blast Furnaces, Foundry, Tract-
Body, Power Plants. 4 Party leaves at 1 p. m. Returns, reaching Ann
or at 6:45 p. m.
CARLTON WELLS.

terlology 3s:
The finalsexamination in Bacteriology 3s and conditione
eriology 3 (Laboratory) and Bacteriology 2 (Lecture)
ay, August 3, at 8:30 a. m., in the Medical Building.
PHILIP

examination in
will be given

CHEMICAL ELEMENTS DIVIDED
BY CHICAGO SCIENTIST
Chicago, July 30-Two chemical el-
ements hitherto considered Indivisible
have been separated by Dr. William
D. Harkins, professor of physical
chemistry at the University of. Chi-
cago, whose experiments in this field
are expected to revolutionize the
chemical theory of a century.
Dr. Harkins explained how he tried
to separate 'chlorine, the greenish yel-
low gas used by the Germans when
they first introduced chemical war-
fare. Chlorine has been considered
one of the 90 odd elements, like car-
bon, ogygen and hydrogen, which
have defied all attempts at division.
These so-called elements are present
in the earth and in the sun.
CENSUS REVEALS GROWTH OF
AMERICAN COLONY IN JAPAN
Tokio, July 30-(By A.P.)-British-
ers who formerly had the largest for-
eign colony In Japan with the excep-
tion of the Chinese, now are being
given a close run by the Americans.
Returns just issued show that there
are 2,562 Lritishers resident in Japan
and 2,549 Americans. There has also
been an increase in the number of
Russians; composed largely of polit-
ical refugees.

Patronize The Daily advertise'rs.

4
GOLF SUPPk1LIES
A BAG OF Mac Gregor Clubs WILL GIVE'YOU
CONFIDENCE AND IMPROVE YOUR GAME.

HADLEY.

imen's League:
Any house desiring to put on a stunt on Saturday afternoon in Barbour
nnasium for the League Party will please call Katy Amonette, 3237.
LEAGUE PRESIDENT.

w

AHR'S

UVNIVERSITY
BD S TO S

i

L

rd

WH AT'S GOING ON
TUESDAY,
5:00--"A Pictorial Survey of Korean
Qivilization," by Prof. W. Carl Ruf-
us. The lecture will be illustrated.
WEDNESDAY
1:00-Excursion No. 11 to the Ford
plant at River Rouge; blast furn-
aces, foundry, body and tractor
plants southwest of' Detroit. Trip
ends at 5 o'clock in the afternoon.
5:00-Lecture in French by Prof. E.
E. Rovillain in Natural Science au-
ditorium
8:00-Concert in Hill auditorium.
THURSDAY
5:00-Lectuure, "The Laboratory Pro-
duction of Stellar Conditions." (Il-
lustrated). Prof. A..R. Sawyer.
8:00-Pducational motion pictures.
FRIDAY
5:00-Lecture, "The History of Mathe-
atics." Prof. L. C. Karpinski.
8:00-Lecture - Recital, "Macbeth."
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, University
Hall'

SATURDAY
8:47 a' ni.-Excursion No. 12. State
Prison and Consumers Power com-
pany plant, Jackson. Trip ends at
4p.m.
U-NOTICES
Summer session students desiring to
use the Union Building this sumner
must obtain card at desk. .A di-
rectory of all students has been com-
piled.

O

. 14

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k

66-

IueuIaI/Iiiil i!Adillu/ggs..ilihiiiuiil[{1 ""t
-The Store of .Serbie-

"

CHORAL UNION TO HOLD
FINAL REHEARSAL TONIGHT
(Continued from Page One)
myth of Cupid and Psyche with the
same mystical'interpretation of medi-
eval times. Parxival's son Lohengrin
is sent from the castle of the Grail to
go to the aid of the Duchess of Bra-
bant, Elsa. Guided by the swan he
reaches Antwerp, and becoming vic-
torious in a battle, wins the hand of
the duchess. He marries her on con-
dition that she -shall never ask his'
origin On breach of this promise
years later,'Lohengrin departs leav-
ing sword, horn and ring behind him.
In the opera Wagner has followed!
closely the old epic poem as develop-
ed by an _unknown Bavarian poet-
singer, of the thirteenth century. The
Choral Fantasia relates the incidents
surrounding the arrival of the myster-

Special-

4

Window
watches

display of
this week.

It would be worth
your time to come
in and look them

Wan~jkted-
men tofind,1, the answer
HIS is written to the man who loves to seek the
unknown quantity. He is the kind of labora-
tory worker who ventures into untried fields of ex-

11

over.

It is a
We
stock

.fine showing..
have a new
of Gruen

Veri-Thin
also a fine

watches
line of

T

taje
"C
)rph
Ch

ious knight in Antwerp, the heat
T H E T H E A T E S the battle, and finaly Lohengrin's v
tory'.
In the tremendous musici clim
contrasting with the love songs
Screen-Today the Wagner Choral give opportun
for skillful chorus work as well
the solos which will be executed1
Grace Johnsop Konold, soprano, W
'stic - Johnnie Walker in lam Wheeler, tenor, and R. Winfie
hildren of the Dust." Adams, baritone. The accompanimen
will be played by Mrs. Emma Fische
eum-Owen Moore in "The Cross and Virginia Tice.
icken In the Case."
WINDSTORM CAUSES DAMAGE
rth--Lupino Lane In "A IN UPPER PENINSUI
lendly Husband."
Iron Mountain, Mich., July 29-(l
A.P.)-It was estimated Sunday th
about half a milion feet of timb
Stage-This Week belonging to the Olive' Iron Minix
Scompany was blown down by t
Iterrific windstorm which swept No
way recently. The company's' timb
ick (Detroit) - The Bon- land is two miles north of the city.
lle company in "The Bird__________
Paradise."y I The way to rent a room Is with
___ IDaily Classified".-Aav.

of
ic-

other makes.

ax
of
ity
as
by
il-
eld
nts
er-
LA
By
.at
er
ing
he1
er

Everyone s ho uld
have a watch and
here is your oppor-
tunity to by a fine
watch of standard
make from a reli-
able jeweler.

-

I

periment, rather than the man who tests materials.
Industry has need of both types, but of the
former there is a more pressing demand.
College men may have been discouraged from
pursuing pure research. In this highly practical
age it may seem there is little room for work
which 'does not have an immediate dollars and
cents application. But such is not the case.
The pure research man is the pathfinder. With-
out him our fountain of knowledge would dry up.
His findings in themselves may be uncommercial,
but they establish a field for others to develop,
Volta worked out the crude voltaic pile-unim-
portant until other men improved and applied
it. And so with Papin in the field of steam, or

I

rue
Fri

"""

Published in
the interest of Elec.
Ical Developmsent by
an Institution that Will
be helped1y what.
ever helps the

-Arthur H. Arnold
State Street Jewelery
302 South State Street
-The Store of Service-
I""""""""l1lfl"""If1""""'"""1 '"""" ll lflal

Lavoi
Me
last.I
Tabora
will al
for th

isier in chemistry.
°n of the inquiring slant of mind, stick to your
In post graduate study, on the faculty, in the
atory of some industrial organization, there
Iways be an "X" to baffle other men and call
e keenest thought of you blazers of the trail.
Electric Co paty

arri
Ste.
of

al

_ _._ . ,
F
'

Since 1869 mnakersy and distributors of elecbrcal equipment

dents Supply
111? SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE

Store

2901f

Now

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