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July 14, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-14

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CIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION OF:
THE, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
'ublisied every morning except Monday during the Summer
n by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
'he Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
ation of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
.ed in this paper and the local news published therein.
ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as aecond
matter.
ubscription by carrier or mail, $i.5o.
)ffices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.,
hones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
not necessarily to appear in print, but as an'evidence of faith,
otices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
. Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
script, will be returned unless the writer 'incloses postage.
'he Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
; expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF'
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR..............LEO J. HERSHDORFER
Editor...............................James B. Young'

I

rd A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
itar ....... . ....Dorothy Bennetts
ard. .............Herbert S. Case, Elizabeth Nylund
or. ...............................Donald Coney
tor................... .. ........Eaton
Assistants

W. B. Butler
Goulder

C. R. Trotter
Sidney Kripke

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
NESS MANAGER ...............HEROLD C. HUNT
sing........................ .. r.Townsend H. Wolfe
tio.......................... ..George W.' Roclwood'
as.........................Laurence It. Favrot
to..................... ...Edward F. Conlin,
Assistants

Hilip H. Goldsmith

Katherine 4. Styer
R t sn Soesrniith

na Y.oung 15. wasonLD. T
FRIDAY, JULY 19, 1922
Night Editor--HOWARDA. DONAhuE'
Assistant-W. Bernard Butler
SLEEP AND I1EARN-NOT
One of the age old college jokes runs somewhat
fogows:
Professor-Smith, wake up that sleeping beauty
xt to you.
Smith (About to sleep in lecture himself)-Why
n't you wake him up yourself, prpfessor, you put
nt to seep?
This is the kind of lethargy many of the .summer
Kool stdnts are afflicted with, according to some
:ent observations made during a lecture in Natur-
Science, auditorium. A grey headed male teach-
of something-or-other in some high school was
served to nod his head in blissful slumber while
e of the most effective of the speakers on the lec-
re program, exerted all his energy in getting his
eech across. This high degree of sustained at-
ition was also being maintained by a school-mis-
ass.
How can we expect to educate Young America
the grammar schools and in the high schools if
r teachers take such a high degree of interest il
sir work that they must slumber whenever they
e offered new suggestions of improvementor of
oadening influence?
Not only is there a marked lack of inattention by
ary in the audiences during the lectures, but there
also such a small attendance at times that we
)nder why the lectures are not held in West Hall.
It is little wonder that many modern American
inkers dispair, of the American educational system
ien teachers will not take advantage of an oppor-
nity to broaden themselves by listening to lectures
fields other than their own. Ever.y one of the
en -who have given lectures this summer Are au-
>rities in their own fields, known throughout the
iole. country for their extensive work-such men
Prof. A. G. Ruthven in natural sciences, E. D.
ckinson in international law, Fielding H. Yost in
11etics, A. H. White in the fixation of atmospheric
:rogen and in the Muscle Shoals plant, H. W. Mil-
- in his investigations on the German long-range
n work, I. D. Scott in the geology of Niagara
1l1s, and so on, including Dr. H. Slonimsky, emin-
t authori'ty in this country on the Jewish religion.
It will be to their advantage if more will acept
the opportunities that are literally being urged
on. them..
DAYS OF LABOR
Days of .enforced study seem to have arrived.
longer will the deluded student sit at his desk
a gaudy dressing gown, wondering why he came
summer school, what it is all about, and why the
tructors fail to give one enough -to do as is their
stom during the busier and longer sessions of the
ar. But with thesis assignments and increased
.ss work, with holidays past and blue books com-
on, ohe need no longer place one's self in the
y of chance activities, or wonder which were the
oks one had always wished to have read, or what
re the things one desired to do but never found
ae to indulge in, in those busy days of the regular
tool year. No longer will one listen for approach-
y foot-steps- and speculate if they mean an invita-
, to attend a movie, go for a walk, or spoil their
peites with an ice or soda at the corner drug

in their fleetness, and possibly as vague in accom-
plishments, one shall awaken to the realization that
the days of study are numbered, even to the profes-
sors who will begin to rush the work for its com-
pletion. Blue books descend with a rush and one
may grieve at not having studied more energetically
during the cooler days of early summer when the
weather man in' spite of his exotic temperament
preserved a certain amount of dignity in his ap-
portionment of heat. 'But. the grievous days of
earnest labor have arrived* to the great relief of
many otherwise bored individuals.
DOES YOUR DOLLAR HAVE WINGS?
John Rockefeller, Jr., in a recent interview dis-
cussed the bringing up of -children, and training
them in spending. He realized as few wealthy
fathers do the dissatisfaction which extravangce
brings. In fact, not only do people of wealth fail to
realize it, but just as often men and women of lim-
ited means. The people who spend least wisely are
often those who have the least to spend. To be
trained in the use of money, to be able to judge its
value, and to spend it to the best advantage is not
amiss in any person, but is especially' advantage-
ous in one of means to bring a wise stewardship of
that wealth, Why is it that homemaking so often
goes on the rocks? Because in a majority of cases
the participants have not learned to regulate and
to plan their expenditures but run deeply into debt
and await father or husband to settle it.
What is a wise policy in the upbringing of chil-
dren, may well be practiced by others. As a rule,
students receive allowances. At the beginning of
the mdnth they are flushand spend recklessly while
it lasts. When it is gone and the necesstiies such
as landladies and bills begin to exert a pressure,
they stop to speculate what happened with the al-
lowance which departed so early in the month. But
there is no immediate danger, dad always helps out
in a case like that. The danger is not for'the present
but is averted until some future time. These people
will eventually have to depend on their own fforts
for'a livelihood and, although they can earn enough,
theer{ is small reason for thinking that it will be
spent to the preagtest advantage to themselves and
to those dependant upon them. Practice of balanc-
ing expenditures to income should not be a personal
concern only but a sort of duty to society.
.......;'.
THE FRYING PA N
"-a flash in the Pan."
The other night, dropping in at the
Concert (a thing we rarely do)
By mistake, being groggy with too
Many fine arts and what-not
(Ever been groggy with what-not?)
We sat next a long haired brother
Who got pretty esctatic over the
Heavy-weight victrola (advt.)
On the platform.;
And at about the seventh round,
When the upper register was beginning to
Pound.
He wrenches.an arm off'n the seat
And chortles 'in my ear drum,
"Isn't her voice heavenly ?"
Us thinking of the possibilities
Of the Great Ammurican Languach
Hisses
"It certainly is unearthly!"
Whereupon the University police rushed in.
His aunt died and left him a ten-spot. "Shall I
spend this ten-spot on Ruth Jones or on Ruth
Smith?" he wondered.
But his roommate 5aid, "Come out with me and
we'll spend, it ruthlessly.
One of the most recent strike developments is
that of the Turkish harem guards. . Steamship of-
fices are reported to have been rushed by nOn-union
menof all countries.

Yesterday Our Daily says in the Mediterranean
steamship tour advertisement that the good ship
"Philadelphia" is a z5,ooo ton mail boat with a
twin-crew.
Sort of Siamese-twin effect, y'know. And if one
gets seasick the other works double shifts.
"What did you say to Marjorie when you pro-
posed?"
"Yes.".
He's So Dumb He Thinks That
The Mexican Border pay hash chkirges.
Aspirin tablets are a new kind of writing paper.
A full house is a bunch of kids.'
This is an English Joke
The mistress, coming into the garden after muf-
fins and tea in the summer house-"And how is
my sweet-william this afternoon?"
Gardner-"Well, thanks, ma'am but be careful
--yer husband's just behind those shrubs!"
"Pardon me, but which is the way to the Dean's
office?"
'That wiay."
"Thank yqu, is it very far?"
"Not so far. When you get there you'll wish it-
was a bloody sight farther."

DETROIT UNITED LINES
TIMUE TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:oo
a. .i,7:oo a. m.i,:oo a. m., 9:0 a. m. and
hourly to 9-o5 p" . .
Jackson Express cars (local stops of Ann
Arbr)- :47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 P. in,
Local Cars, East Bound-- :55 a. in., 7:00
a. m. and every two hours to 9:o. p. m.;
,x :oo p. m. To Ypsilanti onY- 4* P..,
12:2a5 a. n.,I:15 a...
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound--7:5o a. m., 2:40 C
p. M.
To Jackson andKalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47,1:47, i, M.;T::17, 2:47. 4:47 P. M.
To Jackson and Jansing--Limited: 8:47
p. m.

For Your Summer Re
BOOKS

TONIGHT

WHLMR
DANCING PAV

Kennedy's All Stars
- Zierer - Chon, - Darlini

Diamond

! .

i1

7°11

Ann Arbor
Savings Bank

11

enjoy the pleasures of out-door evenings.
MOSQUITO TALCUM OR CRE
will add to the comforts.
"T H E UARRY
DRUG AND PRESCRIPTION STC

from

Two Offices:
N. W. Corner Main and Huron St.
10, N. University Ave.

GRAHEAM'S
Both Stores

Phone 308-Corner S. State and N.

YOU WILL FIND THE

Farmers
adM'chanics Bank

A conveniently placed
makes studying comfor
during summer scho

N'

A pleasant, conven-
lent and SAFE place
to transact your
business.

I

TWO OFFICES:
101-105 South Main St.
330South State st.
Nickels' Arcade
Member of the Federal Reserve
Try Our Prescription
Shampoo for Oily Hair
E. BURNHAM'S -COSMETICS
MRS. T. L. STODDARD

Reduced prices on
DESK LAMPS Al
F L OOR LA M

707 N. University

Phone 2662

1

I

T PC-
Writers
Rented, Sold, Repaired
0. D. MORRILTL
a 'Nickels Arcade
The Typewriter and
Stationery Store
I Te B LUE BIRD
H A I R S HOP Ph
T-HE . SAUNDERS HAIR SHOP
5 NICKELS ARCADE 'II
# ~~Phone 2673M °'I
'Mrs. Gladys Ware f rs.Grace cressor
'l:IteSudrsh hp n rs. ae

The Detroit

Corner Main and
PhONE

U

WA"W

0

* 1il~gtw'

A fact-

'

I's hard to serve
(ood foods all the
time, but the
Arcade Cafeteria
manages to do it.
It's still halder
t o serve th e m
economically.
We've triumph-
ed here, too.
The ARCADE
CAFETERIA

Sheet Music, Player F
and Records of the
and most popular
from the operas

Oll
murnitt Mum-
§nrfl. _ tool

In a music store

idow tc

y ve.noticed a great

t Upstairs in

s Ar4

IL 4 p

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