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July 14, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-14

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the

r i t r

It

III I

uine 25.- (By~ mall) .-Ac-
nis at most of Germany's
and technical high schools
o severely cramped since
y increasing enrollments
are being suggested for
the rising percentage of'
Students from abroad are
o constitute7 25 per cent
3tration.
in the movement to re-
reign influx states that in
room he has noted from
in-Germans, made up prin -
Bulgarians, Rumanians,
:ungarlans, Jugoslavs and[
ans. He declares,. the pre-I
.'these "outsiders" fre-
nsuflcient and that theirI
n "leaves much~ to be de-'
Mle emphasizing the need'
,tailment in the enrollment
Saction against foreigners
he observes that caution
exercised to avoid political
is embarrassment throughl
at procedure.
Phenomenal Since War

n i u iu ii UUIIUULU
0ONRNORIGNSTUDENTS
This complete list includes F'ranikfurt,1
founded in 1914 and now having 4,367'
students, and the universities rof Co-c
logne and Hamburg, both founded. in<
1919, which have enrollments of 4,107
and 3',660, respectively. The ,largest
registration is in the University of,
Berlin, with 12,724, as compared with!.
8,538 in 1914. Munich has increased
from 6,626 to 8,984 and Leipzig from
5,360 to 5,660. Of the four having
morse than 4,000 students before the
fwar, only Bonn suffered a decrease-
from 4,524 to 4,010. Wuerzburg had
the greatest percentage of increase,
its enrollment rising from 1,605 to.
3,307.
O'T' ERS SAY,:f
IB AWNNG TO WORK
(From the Ann Arbor Tinmes-News,
July 12.)
Leslie M. Shaw's recent remark that
"illiterate men are seeking 'work,"
while "the literate are 'sleeping on
park benches," may have an ominous
sound to university studenits who have
been uncertain of industrial conditions
at the time of their graduation.
To those students and near gradu-
ates who are not afraid of a little hard
w~ork, however, the statement need
cause no fear.
Figures prepared at the University'
of Michigan indicate that approximate-
ly 30 per cent of the students work
their way through. Many more earn
part of their expenses, so that a high
precentage of the men learn to work
and work to learn, at one and the same
time.
To these men who earn their own
way, the experiences of others should
mean but little, anyway, for these men
have learned that anything is possible
where the will is strong. They have
learned the things which higher edu-
cation has to offer theme, but they have
not neglected to keep on speaking
terms with daily toil.
The University has shown its'great-
ness in recognizing the real worth of*
these working students, and theire need

To the mian who has, taken his edu-
cation fromn a golden platter four
years of college aire necessary before
he can begin taking graduate study.
But to the than who has had to work
for his learning 1l four years, on the
campus, are in 'Yality post-graduate
courses in industry.
John_ D. Rcckefeller, Jr., declares
that he is attempting to find a sub-
stitute for the old fashioned wood

pile, in order that he may teach hi!
boys the value of work. in adelition to
teaching them industrious habits, ho
points out that giving them something
to do enables' them to learn some-
thing, inculcating habits of thrift
rather than extr'avagan~ce while young.
While many of us will be skeptical
of the severity of. the course of labor
through which M~r. Dockefeller is put-
ting his children, most of us will agree
tha~t he is choosing the wiser course.

cade.--Adv. Ad-V.
White Swan. Laundry for qu~ality White Swan Laundry
and service. Phone 1~65.-Adv. and service. Phone 165.-
Whn"20 In~Wat4
CE N TLEMEN" said the Chem. Prof.,
Jthe end of the term, "You'll probabl
remDember only one thing of all I've trie
to teach you. ,And that is that Water is I121
-and then you'll be wrong."
Even shaving soap isn't always shzavi ,
soap. A cor~rect shaving preparation 11R
Williams' Shaving Cream must do a It
,more than simply make a lathe-r.
-I--t must be generous with its lather. lilt must l
thick' and creamy in cold water or hot,

I

t
Daily Servicet
PUTwIN-7BAY~
l SANDUSKY
hae Big Steamer Put-in-Bay) b
exclusive Excuirsion Steamer, Largest Ball 0
sel's Orchestra. No extra charge for deny-
ners leave on Eastern Time.
xy from Detroit at 9:00 a.m. for
Bay-,Connecting with Cleveland and
sTransit Co., and StearrArrow for

t4

toJ
(on f)
Fineste
Room, Fin;
ing.; Stean
Every da
Put-In-I
Buff alo

, -I't mtust hold its moisture.
"freeze" dry on your face.
--It mnust soften your
beard right down to the
very roots.A

Wiliamns'

hown an -increase of
the war and that of
,h schools has been
d. Just before the
0,000 university stu-
q. At the ,armistice
iped to 90,000. T heresl g t f li g o ,
,21 registering 87,147
,emester 82,668.
schools of the coun-
g 12,000 before the
tumn of 1920 , their
ed 22,976 and last
vledge that the war
greater greed for
younger generation,
ing demoralization
ng, has proved Brat-
nians, there is a dis-
hat "kultur" studies
lecling fascination.
figures for 1914, the
s ' for universities
irollmenits for Evan-
lie theology and for

Middle Bass, Kelley's Island and Lakeside.
Sandusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare $1.40
Cedar Point-15 min. by ferry from Sandusky, Fare including ferry, 165
Excursion fares, (returning same day)
Put-In-Ray, week day, 80c; Su-ndays, Holidays,-$1.15 Rou~nd trip.
Sandusky, every day, $2.00 Round t'-ip.
Four hours at Put-Ir,.Bay; Bathing, visit the Canes, Perry's Monument.
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar Point-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Lar~ge Hotels, Board Walk,
'thousands bathe here daily.
Returning: Leave Cedar Point .by Ferry for Sandusky. Leave Sandusky
from Big Four Dock 2:30 n.m. Put-In-Bay 4:30 pm. Arr. in Detroit, 800 p.mi.
Dancing Moonlights. Leave Ashley & Dustin Steamer Line
Detroit 8:45 p. m. Fare Wed.
&Thurs.a6QcSat. &tun.5.FoofFrtS. DriMch
Write for nmap F 7coFotolFdtStert~. ih

-ITt mrust prepare your
face for, quick, gentle
shaving. Williams' is
so :pure and whole-
some that it actually
helps the most tender

J

I

skinl.

i

,,r

S~liihaving 4

,

E_

.,I

r f, t- .--

,

ost popula in191, also a~s be no fear that such men will ever fill
;opular un1914, als
1 less attractive, although dent- the park benches of the cities~ no mat-
students have more than doubled' ter what industrial conditions may be.
ere has been a slight increasi One of the proudest claims made by
,mistry. The would be physic- Michigan graduates in the past has Maple Walnut
.~w umbr 15,11, whrea inbeen the boast that the University at
hernme r w50,werea16,048.Ann Arbor is a democratic institution. WITH
Uitfeal Fe. Courses Popular If the time ever comes when the stu- Fr jim
bic~lepn~n~ hedsth lstIndent who works is looked down upon, 1'ruitand~
uimbers of university students or is let out of campus activities, itOr n E l .1
ed and in percentage of gain,
9i4. This branch has 17,714 at L m® I u
as compared with 3,836 in the'
rewryear. The study of lawe The..
Jnext with a reg~itration of 16,- .".
compared with 9,840. Mathe-{( f
and physical science have at-M a h
1 9,257, an increase of 1,125.he t c n al s o ls he g a -
mber have flocked to mechanical NO OD
ering, which 8,306 now are, Ateveayedn Michigan mian6caqai
nig as compared with 3,118 in 1 eerplye Billiards here 1q iyu
Electrical science has 5,129 en- X ONCE delr
against 1,307 before the war. g® Teyareallrpetes
are 3,735 in mathematics and I* The more often and reg-
al science in these scho'ols and (C ular you play, the greater z
in constructing engineering, as M your enjoyment.
red with 1,544 and 2,767, re-
vely. Mining and smelting have ___
red a gain from 576 to 1,234.g
ecture. alone, is the technical U' Vn
ant dropping from 2,193 to 1,811.
rin U H~as 12, 724 Students U --
3 universities mentlonei in cur- j s
tatistics only four have shown - ;U
tiler enrollment than in 1914. DILtjITAi Dg CIGARS CANDIESa
PIPES LUNCHES SODAWS
Ls-Bargain Counter-50c each T he* * ~
'ahr's University Bookstore.-- .
ewriting and Mimeographing GARRIC K MThus., 2t. 0
~y 0 D. orr~l, 7 Nikels Ar-usNights, 25--50-75c-$l1L E
)y O D.Morill 17Nickls'Ar- 13t AnualSeason-Tenth Week{N
-Adv. The BON STFELLECo. E
'n 16e Novel, Fascinsting. Cape Cod Comedy
Next: "Miss Nellie of N'Orleams" f
COLLUMN COSSA8P.Mk
ED-Donor for blood transfu-
Typ)e four, compensation, $15.
ress Mrs. H.lD. Kratz, 1220 E.
,hngton St., or Tel. 1047-W. 19-4 FRIDAY-SATURDAY
RENT-Furnished apartment in CH LARLES ~R AY
fner Apts., Hill St., till Oct. 1. X 1 kI~12
ydesirable. Address Box X, ,
Y. 19 Ra So \T* P.
W of education and reflneme.nt
res position as matron of soror- Comedy New
Address 7635 12th St., Detroit. , - COMING
18-3 GLADYS WALTON
-Plain S. A. E. pin. Finder "The t
c,-fnfnRfvRrniT e1le f' ise Kid"/"

NV"HV\

w

Week-End
.Special
Try thi
17ehciaus
'ashinglon
Phon~es 1427-
2830

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TODAY - .1ATU
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Saturday,

JIGH4T,
the
~ic-rIIRE

With an excellh

Added:
14EW 'S

A N

MONKEY
D 0ORC H

nGomigSunday.:KATI
Umglinn "DO MESTI
MM Aliso LLOYD H'AM

III

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Yr;

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I V 4, vAv - i -.,

The Coolest Place in Town to spend anI

FRIDAY - SAI
ETHEL CL
"FORTHE 1
A Paramnount.

Y

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