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July 14, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-14

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FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

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DAY AND:3

VOL. XIII. No. 19

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY,- JULY 14, 1922

)ISORDERS

HIT

PERE

MARQUET

.. ... r

T OUOK DRK FOR
BITUMINOUS MINE1
STRHIE SOLUTION
ATTACH ADDITIONAL CONDITIONS
TO PRESIDENT HARDING'S
TERMS
ANTHRACITE WORKERS
AGREE TO MEDIATION

WILL RAZE OLI)
PHYSICS BUILDING
Buildings and grounds officials an-
nounced yesterday afternoon that the
old Physics building will be 'torn
down now because in caseof fireits1

SLONIMS ,KY ENDS
LECTURE SERIES
Concludes Program with Lecture on
Significance of Messianic
Ideal
SAYS VALUES AND PEACE
MAKE FOR RELIGIOUS LIFE

Washington Officials Disturbed
Uncertainty of Confernee
Outcome

by

(By Associated Press)
Washington, iuly 13.--Although the
Arthrr cite operators have submitted
what President Harding is said to
r-g td as at'completetacceptance of the
goverinment's offer to arbitration' in
t, .e coal strike, the situation with re-
tc i the bituminous operators and
the miners' union continued under a
vI!nl' of on.'eAity ..oda with both
~ ~,iiu~'ga lpolicy obviously. (11-)
r ;ng tc dinistartionc 'iiciais
4) liciu sDistu- bed
Declarmig the intents^n is to de-
lay or evade zw intmediate response,,
high officials see in the course pus-
sued a disposition to reject the gov-
ernment's settlement plan if, public:
opinion would approve such a course.
The anthracite operators attached
'two conditions to their acceptance
of arbitration yesterday, one that a
separate commission examine wage
scales in that industry and the oth-
er that the commission be required
to submit a decision by Aug. 10, agree-
ing in the meantime to pay the wage
rate of 'March 31 as suggested in the
President's proposal. They asked that
the proposed separate commission be
required to set up a permanent meth-
ed by which wages and working con-
ditions would be adjusted "automatic-
ally" in the future and proposed toy
assure a non-partisan 'adjudication,
that the commission be composed of
one miner, one operator and three
representatives of the public.
Object to J roposal
The bituminous (operators' objec-
tions were said to attack the Presi-
dent's proposal to put the men back
at wage scales of 1920-22, when non-
union mines, with 200,000 employes,'
had been steadily working all through
1921 at wages practically identical
with those of 1917. This not only will
force disturbances of operation in
non-union territory, in the view of the
operators, but will leave them with
high cost coal to sell in competition
with lower cost non-union coal.
HUE PARLEYFILS

proximity to the Clements' libraryI
would endanger that building. The
location of the class rooms that must
replace those to be destroyed has not
been learned. The finished roof will
be put on the new library as soon as
the cinder fill is set and dry.
Steel beams are now being placed'
in. the second story of the Dental
building and it is expected that by
fall it will be ready for use. Desks,
cabinets and as much of the equip-
inent as possible is being made in the
building and grounds shops.
A contract has been given the H. G.
Christman and company for an addi-
tion to the storehouse and shops
building.
MOTOR TRANSPORT MEN
WANT IUR150ICTION OF
UTILITIES COMMISSION
(By Associated Press)
Detrojt, July 13.-The motor truck
transport business in Michigan, cred-
ited with an increase of about 100
per cent within the last 12 months, is
to make its influence felt at the next
session of the state legislature, when
an effort will be made to obtain leg-
islation more favorable to the trade;
it is announced by F. L. Henk of
Detroit, secretary of the National
Team and Motor Truck Owners' as-
sociation.
According to Mr. Henk, Michigan
now is a network of motor truck
routes that extend between the chief

"If the religion of the moral com-
mends itself to the adult thinking
mind, then the religion of the proph-
ets can lay the claim to becoming the
religion of the future," summarized
Dr. H. Slonimsky yesterday in the
last of a series of three lectures he
has been giving on the Prophetic Re-
ligion before students attending the
Summer session. His topic was "The
Permanent Significance of the' Mes-
sianic Ideal."
The speaker went on to say that
two ideas will force the moral person
to religious assumptions: the idea of
conservation 'of values, the feeling
that this great value of the mind must
not die, that is, must go on, and see-
ondly that of peace, the prophetic
thought that history is distinctly
fraught with a purpose, with a goal,
which goal is that the people shall
beat their swords into plowshares.
In tracing the philosophical basis of
religion, Dr. Slonimsky pointed out
that there is no distinct emotion of
religion, but that emotions can be-
come religious if they are strong
enough.
Chance actions, he said, force humans
to deep religious thought, as do also
disappointments and the very nature
of things. He declared, the average
person does need this chance to bring
him to thoughts about religion. "But
the deeper spiritual nature will not
wait for the accidents of life," he
continued. "He will see that the ac-

SUMMER STUDENTS
TO EXPLORE FALLS
Making the longest trip of all the
excursions, Summer session students
will leave at 2:05 o'clock today for
Niagara Falls. The trip is in charge
of Prof. I. D. Scott of the geology de-
partment, who has visited the Falls
more than 10 times and has made the
most minute study of the geological
history of the region. The tourists
will not only be able to visit the
points of scenic interest, under the
supervision of one most familiar with
the ground, but they will also be in-
structed in the scientific phases of the
great waterfall and the Gorge.
Arriving at Niagara Saturday, the
party will spend the afternoon tour-
ing the Great Gorge. On Sunday the
excursionists will explore Goat Is-
land and the Cve of the Winds. On
the decks of the "Maid of the Mist"
the party will experience the thrill
of almost touching the foot of the
American Falls.
The Niagara Falls excursion party
will leave at 2:05 o'clock this after-
noon on a special Detroit, Jackson and
Chicago car which may be boarded
either at the interurban station or at
the corner of State and Packard
streets. The poster notlees, to the
effect that the party will leave via
the Michigan Central, are incorrect.
M x-f
MYTEHRY-COFFIN CAUSES
DEITLERA DEATH RUMOR
PROVISIONALS WARN CITIZENS
AGAINST RESISTING
AUTHORITY
Dublin, July 1]3.-Eamonn de Vale-
ra again has been reported dead, but
this rumor is not credited by any of
the Free State officials.
Limerick was the seat of this ru-
mor. According to the report, a mys-
terious coffin, draped with the Irish
Republican colors and under guard
of irregular troops, was lying in state
in a church. The lid of the coffin had
been screwed down and the corpse
could not be seen.
The irregulars claim the capture
of two Free State generals, Hayes and
Connelly, in County Limerick.
The Irish provisional government
has issued a manifesto warning the
people in the following words:
"We've armed groups, who are tak-
ing upon themselves the responsibil-
ity for making war against the Irish
people, permitted to remain under
arms to continue their unnatural ac-
tivities, this country would be faced
with economic ruin and famine as
well as the return of the British.
Regulars assert the situation in the
South is satisfactory. However, the
irregulars claim to have won a series
of successes north of Cork which gives.
them control of part of the Counties
of Kerry, Wexford, Cork and Mayo.
A dispatch from Belfast quoted P.
J. Little, the Belfast "press agent" of
the- Republicans, as saying that the
people of Cork have accepted the re-
public which wts proclaimed there by
rebels on Tuesday.
Wire communication has been cut
betw'een this city and Co rk. The
strict isolation of Cork is causing
consternation here. Up to noon not
even a travieler had arrived from
Cork to bring any news of events in
that part of Ireland.
APPOINT COLLINS
IRISH ARMY HEAD

DISTURBANCES FOLLOWED
CALL FOR ARMED,
FORCES

WIRE; REQ UEST FOR* 500 TROOPS
TOPOETSAGINAW RAIIL SH(
IEWELLRBENEWSREFUSAL OF

BY,

cities of the state and supplement
th i oad an elkt etions of soul are, limited by the very
+1.h. r,.ilrn.ra n rA ednt.i,'. limes Qin -the_

Announce -Departure
Moscow Sunday

for'

The Hague, July 13-At midnight
e Russian delegation issued a state-
ent that the conference was evident-
over. Maxin Litvinoff, head of the
)viet said, he planned to leave for
oscow Sunday.
Give Luncheon for Miss Sheldon
The board of governors of Betsy
arbour house and Miss Lilah G.
ainer entertained about 45 guests
riday afternoon in honor of Miss
ilah Sheldon, whose engagement to
r. Wentworth Myers has been an-
)unced. A 5 o'clock luncheon was
rved in the dining room, which was
tractively decorated with garden
owers.
NOTICE, INIAGARA EXCUR-.
SIONISTS I
The party will leave Ann Ar-
bor at 2:05 via the D. J. and. C.
electric road. It has been incor-
rectly stated previously, that the

Le rair u6ULrLU CL11" 1 lr
matter of freight carrying.
Several questions of vital intere t
to the truckmen are scheduled to
come before the attention of the law
makers at Lansing next winter, in
the opinon of Mr. Henk, chief of
which will be the proposal to place
the truck operators under jurisdic-
tion of the public utilities commis-
sion, the state body that fixes rail-
road and interurban rates.
To.Ask Study of Problems
The truckmen, it is announced, will
not be averse to such control provided,
a close study is made of the opera-
tors' problems by the legislature. It
is pointed out. that rates on freight
handled by truck should be neither
too high nor too low, and that an ec-
onomic. study should be made to de-
termine upon regulaions that would
serve the best interests of operators
and shippers alike.
The trucking interests, Mr. Henk
announces, also are to seek miodifica-
tion of the 1917 law that limits the
loads of trucks in wet weather. Under
the law the road commissioners in
each county have the authority to
pass upon the condition of the roadst
and state what-roads may be carried
in each county. The truck owners
want this authority placed in the
hands of the state highway depart-
ment so that uniform regulations may
be set.up. They also desire that the
cement roads be exempt from the wet
weather regulations. At present all
classes of roads are considered
equally during wet weather.
AIL L I E S REFUSE
GERMAN DEMANDS
Paris, July 13.--The reparations
commission today notified the German
government in reply to the demand
for a moratorium for repartions pay-
ments, that it would give a definite
answer only when it has in hand the
full report of the committee on guar-
antees which went to Berlin a short
time ago to supervise reforms to

natural order.
In conclusion Dr. Slonimsky sr
"The great idea must be an idea of
world peace. Values must be con-
served. Death and defeat of the good
are only apparent." This last idea, h'
said, is a necessary supplement to the
moral doctrine without which) the
moralist would have to despair.
PRISONERS BATTLE
POLICE IN RIOT
(By Associated Press)
Detroit. July 12.- More than 100
girls in the house of Good ;hepherd
here, rioted late today, routed two de-
tectives who attempted to subdue,
them, and battled a number of police-
men sent in answer to' a riot call.
During the disturbance doors and
windows were broken and water fau-
cets were pulled from the floors, the
lower two stories of the instiution be-
ing flooded.
lNight girls are said, by the police
to have escap5ed during the fighting.
They scaled the walls surrounding;
the institution. One made her escape
by an automobile, the others dodged,
into alleys and disappeared.
The girls engaging in the riot rang-
el irom 16 to 19 years in age, and
most of them had been sent to the in-
stitution by judges in city courts.
LARGE AUDIENCE
SEES SCENIC FILM

BEA F T WO NON-UNIONl
MEN, OTHERS ABDUCTED
Marshal Newton Ask's Aid of Presi.
dent Harding at Behest of Road
Operators
(By Associated Press)
Detroit, July 13.-Frank T. New-
ton, United States marshal for the
eastern Michigan district, today tel-I
egraphed the United States attorney
general in Washington asking thatE
50 federal troops be sent to Saginaw
for duty at the Pere Marquette rail-
road shops, where 1,200 men are on
strike. The shopls were the scene of
disorders last night, two non-union
men being beaten and others ordered
out of town.
Deputies Inadequate
The request followed Marshal New-
ton's return from Saginaw, where lastE
night he witnessed the labor disturb-1
ances. He made a statement saying
he was content that local authorities
would not be able to iV~ocure enough
deputies-to control the situation.
ILater he went into conference witht
officials of the Pere Marquette rail-
road here and railroad officials askedF
that immediate steps be taken by thE
President to protect their Saginaw
shops.1
Fort Wayne, an army post, is lo-
cated in Detroit. Other federal troops
are stationed at Camp Custer, BattleE
Creek, to train men of the 'citizens'
army now encamped.1
" a
GOLFERS START P L aYf
FD US:' CHAMPIONHP
Skoki County club Glencoe, Ill.,
July 13.-The qualifying rounds in
the national open golf tournament
ended. tonight, and tomorrow 79E
players, many of them champions andt
all" survivors of a field representinga
every golfing nation in the world, willt
start the 72 hole final for the Amer-
ican open championship.
Officially, the winner will be cham-
pion of the United States, but in thet
minds of many he will be consideredt
holder of the world's golf title, for
victory will be obtained only through
defeat of champion club swingers
from all sections of the universe.t
Twenty-four men won their way intos
tJe finale in today's qualifying round..
SENATE DEMOCRATS
BACK FORD OFFER
Washington, !July' 13.-Democraitic
member of the Senate Agriculture
committee completed plans today for
presentation to the committee at its
meeting tonight of a motion to report
favorably the offer of Henry Ford for
purchase and lease of the government
property at Muscle Shoals, Ala. t
It was not expected, however, thatt
the motion Would be presented until
after tYe committee had concluded Its
final examination of all bidders fors
Muscle Shoals./
It was learned that J. W. Worth-
ington, chairman -of the executivei
committee of the 'ennessee RVer
Improvement association, would ap-t
pear for Mr. Ford and acting on in-
Mtructionsi .from Detroit, would in,-
form the committee that Mr. Ford's
proposal can not be further modified
in any essential detail by the commit-I

WILL NOT CALL OFF STR
IL "JUSTICE IS
SECURED"
HINTS ROADS HOPI
TO DESTROY U.
Shop Craft Delegates Blam
In Reply to Harding's t
clamation

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, July 13-The railwa
men strike will no be called c
the men. will no be ordered b
work "until justice has been
ed," B. M. Jewell, head of th
way employes department c
American Federation of Labo
'tonight in a statement replying
rail executives' ultimatum of
day.
The rail executives suggest
the strike be called off and ti
return to. work after which
ences might be taken befor
United States Railroad boarc
Intimates Trick .
\Mr. Jwell, in tonight's stt
intimated that the reason the
tives refused to meet shop cr
cials in an effort to mediate th
as had been suggested, was t
r'ilways hope to destroy th<
ployes' 'organizations.
If such is the case, the sta
said, the railroads are. "due to
a sudden awakening, the Ar
public should charge them w:
responsibility."
At the labor board it, wa
.ounced that an effort might bi
along new lines to settle the
but no details were given.
Answer arding
The shop ,raft representat
plied today to President Ha
proclamation which declared ti
strike must be settled throi
authorized agencies, by placi
blame for the strike on the ra
and asserting that carriers hE
lated any decisions of the
board.
Other events during the day'
od orders fromn the war depa
to have troops in readiness t
tect the Missouri, Kansas,
lines in the hands of a receiv
pointed by the United States
Announeement by Postmaster C
Work that 50,000 motor vehici
be used to transport the mails
service fails and the issuing
straining orders were issued
St. Louis, San Francisco railw
Fort Smith, Arkansas, and tb
cago and Eastern, Illinois, and t
ledo, St. Louis and Western ra
at East St. Louis, Ill.
St. Louis, July 13-Four con
of the 13th infantry, Missou
tional Guard, late today depar
Toplar' Fluss, where requests
been made for troops in case e
tualities in connection with th
men's strike.
Cincinnati Olto.-July .-
Carroll, president of the general
men's association of the maint
of way brotherhood, announc
night on- leaving for Louisvill
he carried in his portfolio reqt
a majority of the general ch
of the brotherhood of manteni
way and shop laborers that h
Meeting of the general chairme

Summer session students crowded -
Natural Science auditorium to the Dublin, July 13.-Michael Collins
doors last evening, to see the second has been 4aroin*d ;commander-4n-
of the series of Educational motion chief of the Irish national army, 1it
pictures which are being put on week- was officially announced today. Col-
ly during July and August. lins, Richard Mulcahy and Gen. Owen
Prof.-Thomas E. Rankin of the rhe- O'Duffy will comprise a war council in
toric department, gave a brief intro- supreme charge of military operations
ductory talk announcing the titles of throughout the country. Mulcahy also
the reels, which were "Home Making is named chief of staff of the army.
in Canada," "The Great Lakes," "A ,O'Duffy has been' in command of the
Friend in Need," and "Yellowstone southwestern division of the Irish
National Park." forces.
The next of these series will be Mulcahy, who also is the minister of
shown next Thursday evening in Na- defense, is considered the ablest stra-

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