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July 11, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-11

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I# Mn

743ttt lU

CIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION OP
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ublished every rmorning except Monday during the Summer
n by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
ation of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
ed in this paper and the local/news published therein.
ntered at the postoffice .at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter'.
ubscription by carrier or mail, $1so. ,
ffices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
hones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414-
oinunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
ot necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,,
otices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
script will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.- .'
'he Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
1expressed in the communicatonis."
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR............. .I lO J. HERSHDORFAR
Editor...............................James B. Young
Editors-.
Howard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
ng Editor..................................Jack D. Briscoe
n's Editor...........................Dorothy Bennettst
rials ................................ .Herbert S. Case
r Editor................ ....... ....Donald Coney
ry ditor......................... ......G. D. Eaton
Assistants

W. B, *Butler

Leona Horwitz

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
IESS MANAGER.........HEROLD C. HUNT
sing............................. Townsend H. Wole
tion........................t.......George W. Roclkwood
t ....................Laurence H. Favrot
tion........................ . .......E dward A. Conlin

Goldsmith

Assistants
E. Clark Gibson'

Katherine E. Styer

TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1922
Night Editor-W. BERNARD BUTLER
Assistant-Herbert S. Caser
MAKE US LAUGH, PROFESSOR
)f c'ourse there is something incongruous in the
:ion of a dignified college professor being a hum-
st. but it is possible as is shown by the case of
>f. Stephen LeacoCk, of McGill unniversity. In-
:ect does not have to be poluted wvith dignity,
dignity as a rule is inclined to savor pretty
.ch of sham. Dignity without sham is not dig-
y, but just good manners.;
5tadents do npt enjoy being tauht by one who
ks all sense of humor, and certainly the profes-
r who appreciates jocularity and injects it into
class room need not loose the respect of his
Oils or control of his classes.
There is a professor in the Medical college who
ecognized as one of the world's greatest au-
rities in his special line of work, and be is a
nous teacl7er. Yet he has a keen sense of humor
I endears himself to his classes by his continual
ofs it. -
the days of the grouch and the sober-face have
>pily been put on the shelf, and even a college
fessor is being looked upon as human, and is
pected to laugh. Laughter and humor will not
.y build up a man, but it will go a long way to-
rds putting a nation on Rand, McNally's clored
ets.
PAGE MR. CRIMINOLOGIST
Questions as to whether or not an ex-convict has
n reformed by his study in a penitentiary are
en brought up and answered in the negative. The
sgn for ,he failure of the convict'to reform is
en given as a lack of desire on the part of the
.n to go ;straight, and this is attributed to the
t that his mental attitude is one of seeking to
: even witlq society.
Once in a while a man demonstrates a great de-
e to get back to a normal social status and to live
h his fellow-men. Such a man was John Francis
ynn who ostensibly reformed, wrote poetry about
sOn life some of which attempted to show that a
- could reform after years in prison, and who
veled extensively talking prison reform in a seem-
ly intelligent manner. Upon appearing at one
tle. local churches during the last winter he
ned quite a bit of sympathy with the tale of the
ustice of his penitentiary term, with his desire to
rk for the improvement of the lots of other ex-
Ivicts to the exclusion of his own interests; and
succeeded in selling his poetry to help the cause.
at a 'noin with such talent and who apparently
lerstood his relation to society as a case of an
>ortuiity to make good should be arrested re-
ttly on a charge of attempted robbery has a
dency to remove people's faith in all convicts
ecially those who show signs of intelligence. It
y be that Glynn's purpose in coming to Ann Ar-
was to reform the students rather than to seek
p for any of his fellow sufferers, but if it was
latt'er he has done the cause the greatest harm
Mible by connecting his name with it.,
IIHO WANTS PRE-WAR CONDITIONS?
et back to normalcy ! Get back to normalcy !
e American people everywhere are crying for
malcy and pre-war conditions-crying for some-
ig they will never get. Conditions never can be

The human being should always strive for an
ideal, and this ideal should be so far off that it can
niever be attained. It should be always out of
reach. With everything there should be room for
improvement. If the American people wish to get
back to pre-war conditions, then they signify their
acceptance of those conditions as their ideal, and
having realized their ideal, will go back, walking
once more on all fours.
There are too many who are just waiting, and
consoling themselves by believing that they will be
on easy street when conditions get back to normal.
Too bad.. For out of this hodgepodge of political
graft, sentiment, murder and hot.air that the world
has recently been saturated with, and still smacks a
bit of, there is going to be molded a new universe,
with new and better ethical and business standards.
Conditions will be such that there will be very few
coaches made out of pumpkins. Competition is hav-
ing its edge sharpened, and it is going to require
brains to accumulate fortunes. Gray-matter is go-
ing to be in greater demand.
So forget the cry to.get back to nomalcy, for it is
not what the world wants, needs, and can have.
The world is going forward, not backwad. And
the United States is just a nose ahead of the rest
of the universe!
Aren't there some others who, en those hot days,
long for the oldet times when the Orient and Joe's
Place kept such refreshing beverages?
If we were to judge by the movies there are only
two types of men, i.e., the sheik and the meek.
We wonder if your boarding house also serves
nothing but roast beef or cold pork.
, qutS... .................. .. .....t.,... ......... ..... .c . uS.p.,.., .
TH E'FRYING PAN
~it.T""-a flash in the Pan"N
....... .M. . . . ............... ...... .. ....... ..I.Y..... ... i
A FOOT NOTE TO COLYMN CONDUCTING
A colyum is a simple way
To indicate time's flight;
You only have to finish one
When there's one more to write.
In those simple, happy days, before the Summer
session, when we were $ mere student and not a
colyum conducted at all, we took humor lightly.
Humor, thought we, was a thing to be intercepted
gracefully as it passes by, not something to be
stalked with notebook and blood-hounds. Then in
one of those less sane moments our friends mention
so disparagingly, we took over thishumor colyum.
The editor, in his disarming way, said he would
give us twelve inches a day. We thanked him and
came away, wondering at his moderation. Ten
inches ! Paltry space! We went home and looked
it up on the landlady's yard-stick-liow small it
seemed. Often, during the early canoeing season,
we had said enongh clever things in one evening
to fill twice that space. Of course, with the in-
spiration of the moment and with the moon to help,
the situations are not exactly comparable: So we
found to our subsequent dismay.
"Given a set of morning papers, and child ....
can write a colym," casually remarks F. P. A. He
may be a successful colyum conductor, but his views
of the ease with which this commerce can be car-
ried on are lamentably incorrect. ,
We know. We got a set of morning papers-and
a child. It was the landlady's son. "Come, Am-
brose the colyum!" And then we could invite in
the children of the neighborhood to get variety.
Of course you couldn't expect a young boy of twelve
to get a lot of variety into his stuff day after day.
But it didn't work. The young scamp only read
the sport page and the cohic pictures and stole a
package of cigarettes off my desk. His mother got
quite nasty about some people corruptin' -the youth
of the community.
So we were driven to predatory excursions among
the back numbers of Life and Judge and the col-
lege comics. A joke, you know, is like an um-
brella. Common property tf nobody sees you take

I thought it was my own !" or "A blind man asked
me to hold it for him," or something like that.
And we acquired the notebook habit. Our friends
are very careful now about what they say within
our hearing. We never laugh anymore at a funny
story. Ah no, we are too busy asking ourselves
whether it is too old or too deep or too some-
thing for the colyum.
A funny life, conducting a humorous colyum.
Gaucherie
Parini les onoureux
Je ne trouve pas place.
Ma s, en regairdant ceux
Parmi les amoureux
-aire le sot; a Dieu
i1 me faut rendre ttces:
Parmi les amoureux
Je we trouve pas place.
THOMAS A CELANO

WrATCH
BRACELET
RI BBONS
Special heavy Silk Ribbons,
black and gray,

If your clothes are not
coming to you, you I
better be coming to t
Swissilized Garments Stay Clean

25c.

Decorated Silver, Gold,
Brown, Blue, Yellow,
Hand Painted.
Watch Mesh Bracelets in
green and yellow gold.
HALLER &FULLER

:11

PHONE

Tharme naerninr
"ompny
"The Home of Encrgin e"

2508

For Your Su

... ...
i

209 South Fourth Avenue
I

STATE STREET JEWELERS

I'

:..tI

YOU WILL FIND THE
Farmers
and Mechanics Bank

F .

from

BOOKS

GRAHAM'S
Both, Stores

~~

A pleasant, conven-
ient and SAVE place
to transact your
business.

TWO OFFICES
101-105 South Main St.
330 South State St.
Nickels' Arcade
Member of the Federal Reserve

I

... __ d

I

ANNAROR+A TU
SHOE FACTORY
We will make use of them and the best
leather to, make your shoes. BriYour
repairs to our factory at. 534 FOREST

I

All the year around Whitma
are best. We are featuring
packages that slip 'in the pc
Better try them.

1922 JULY
S 9[ T W T

F 1922
FS
1r

2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12) 13 14 15
16 1 S,1 0 223 24 25 26 27 28 . 29
30 31
PANAMA AND STRAW HATS
CLEANED THE RIG~HT WAY
Prices for cleaning Panamas $1.25 up.
Prices for stiff straws...... .75 up.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
X17 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

Calkins
/ .

-

DRUG COMPA
324 S. State St.--711 Packard St. --E. ai

Ur

rI

Ann Arbor
Savings Bank
Two Offices:
N. W. Corner Main and Huron St.
707 N. University Ave.

I

A
'I

-U

r
, _

1

RAIN WATER SHAMPOOS
Maroelling Manicuring
water waving
Mrs. T. L. Stoddard,
Tel. 2652 707 N. University
DETROIT UNITED LINES'
TIME TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6 :oo
a. In., oo a. m., :oo a. m., 9:00 a. im. and
hourly to 9 :o5 p. in..,
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor)-9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 P. in.I
Local Cars, East Bound-s 5s a. m., 7-o
a. mn. and, every, two hours to g :oe p. mn.;
z -: -p."in. To Ypsilanti only-z:4o p. m.,
12:25 a. in., 115s a. in.
To Saline, change at Ysilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7:5 a. in., 2:40
~P. in.'
To Jackson and Kalamazoo--Limited cars:
8:4, 10:47, a. m.; 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 P. m.
To Jackson and LansingLimited: 8:47
p. mn.

Daily Service
to PUT-IN-BAY
and SANDUSKY
(On the Big Steamer Put-in-Bay)
Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest Ball 0
Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra charge for danc-
ing. Steamers leave on Eastern Time.
Every day from Detroit at 9:00 a. m. for
Put-In-Bay-Connecting with'Cleveland and
Buffalo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrow for
Middle Bass, Kelley's Island and Lakeside.
Sandusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lin
Cedar Point-15 min. byferry from Sandusky, Fare includ
Excursion fares, (returning same day)
Put-In-Bay, week day, 80c; Sundays, Holidays,$1.15 Roun
Sandusky, every day, $2.00 Round trip.
Four hours at Put-In-Bay; Bathing, visit the Caves, Per
Pavilion, Groves, Dancingrand many other attractions, seve
Cedar Point-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hote
Thousands bathe here daily.
Returning: Leave Cedar Point by Ferry for Sandusky.
from Big Four Dock 2:30 n. m. Put-In-Bay 4:30 p. m. Arr. in D
Dancing Moonlights Leave , Ashley & Dustin
Detroit 8:45 p.m. Fare Wed.
&Thurs. 60cSat. &Sun. 75c. Foot of First St.
Write for map folder
A: , 4

Gallows-Meat
The dumb duck who explains that
heat, it's the humidtiy."

ATTENTION

"it's not the

With some of the light-weight- summer trousers
men are now wearing petticoats are almost a neces-
city.

Fraternities, Sororities, Clubs
and other organizations
can be well taken
care of by calling
ANN ARBOR REALTY
Nattonal Bank Building
Phone 40

. S

...

Are they keeping open ho
I dence. or just raisinz ie roc

at Newberry Resi-

.;

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