100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 11, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I MMMM

iAY, JANUARY 11, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TEMAM,

.ra.a. } vsa+.w v.

AY. ANAY 1.15ShU I~IGNDALYPGETHE

.......... .. ,.. T«a.

.,,.

Icers Lose,

Wrest1

ers Suffer i
Hutton Incurs Hand Injury
In Wolverines' 3-2 Defeat

First

Big

Ten

Loss

Marchello Bright Spot
For Michigan Grapplers

C.

EFFORT FOILED-Michigan left winger Gary Mattson, attempting to score in the final period of
last night's hockey game with Michigan Tech, was foiled by goalie George Cuculick. An unidentified
Michigan Tech defenseman is standing by ready to prevent any further goal attempts by Mattson.
Cuculick, making his first appearance before the Michigan qteam, played a brilliant game in
Tech's 3-.win.
AN PELT IN SENIOR BOWL TODAY'
All Star Games Set for New, Old Pros

By The Associated Press
.New and old gridiron pros will
take the field in two all star games
this weekend. ,s
College seniors will be matched
on North and South squads this
afternoon in the ninth annual
Senior Bowl at Mobile, Ala., for
their first test as professionals.
Included in the North* roster is
Michigan quarterback Jim Van
Pelt.
Los Angeles will be the scene
of the eighth annual Pro Bowl to-
morrow, as an all star squad from
the Eastern Division faces the
best material from the Western
Division.
Professional football scouts will
saturate the stands as two 25-man
teams battle for money for the
first time in the Senior Bowl.
Alt-America Players
The squads include 15 members
of The Associated Press All Amer-
ica squads and 30 players who al-
ready have been drafted in the pro
draw.
Forty-five of the 50 squadsmen
played in one or more post-season
bowls or all-star games before re-
porting to Mobile.
The South was picked as a one-

point favorite by professional
oddsmakers but the heavier North
team had considerable backing
among the pro coaches and scouts
on hand for the game.
Members of the winning team
will receive $500 each, the losers
$400.
A near sellout was forecast for
the 36,000 capacity Ladd Stadium.
Rival coaches already have
named their "dream backfields"
for the Pro Bowl, while promoters
prayed for good weather and a
record crowd at Memorial Coli-
seum.
The West, coached by George.
Wilson of the NFL champion De-
troit Lions, is a slight favorite.
In his backfield, Wilson will
start Y. A. Tittle of the San Fran-
cisco 49ers at quarterback, 49er
Hugh McElhenny at right half,
Tommy Wilson, Los Angeles Rams,
left half, and Rick Casares, Chia
cago Bears, at fullback.
Parker Coaches East
Buddy Parker of the Pittsburgh
Steelers, coaching the East, nom-
inated little Eddie Le Baron of
the Washington Redskins to lead
off at quarterback. Ray Fenfro,
Cleveland Brown right half, Ollie

Matson, Chicago Cardinal left
half and Rookie of the Year Jim
Brown, Cleveland, fullback com-
plete the backfield.
The West holds a 4-3 lead in
the series. The players are se-
lected by the NFL coaches. This
year the members of the winning
squad collect $700, the losers $500.
Both games will be nationally
televised by NBC. Kickoff time
for the collegians is 3 p.m., EST,
and NBC will also radio broadcast
the tilt. The Pro Bowl starts at 4
p.m., EST.
'M' Mno
Annouencesr
.Reiremenflt
Baseball coach Ray Fisher was
given official permission by the
Regents yesterday to begin his re-
tirement next fall.
The 70 year old coach will com-
plete this season because Athletic'
director H. 0. Crisler reported that
the successor he would like to
recommend would not be available
until the fall of 1958, the notice
of the Regents action said.
Fisher and Crisler, who is out of
town, could not be recahed for
comment.
Fisher has been coach since 1921.
He left the Cincinnati Reds base-
ball team in the spring of that
year to assume the coaching duties
at Michigan.
Fisher's baseball teams have won
nine Big Ten Championships, and
shared the title five times in the
past 36 years.
Last year Michigan's baseball
team finished second in the Big
Ten.

(Continued from. Page 1)
Michigan's captain, Neil Mc-
Donald, assisted by Ed Switzer
and Bobby Watt, grabbed posses-
sion of the puck, skted up the
right side of the ice, getting past
two Tech players and fired a goal
from 12 feet out.
Both goalies were constantly
peppered in this period, but were
spectacular in making saves.
Childs registered'20 in this period
and 39 for the entire game.
New Goalie
Michigan Tech revealed a new
goalie, George Cuculick, to Mich-
igan fans and he put on an ex-
cellent display of goal-tending,
registering 37 saves for the night.
It took 'Michigan only 1:19 of
the second period to gain the lead,
and it looked as if the Wolverines
might be on their way to their
third WIHL victory.
McDonald slapped a hard shot
at the Tech goalie who blocked it,
but Delki Dozzi slammed the re-
bound past Cuculick. Switzer
gained his second assist of the
evening on the play.
For the next 15 minutes of the
period, both teams missed excel-
lent chances to score. The check-
ing became rougher and the skat-
StatistiCs
FIRST PERIOD: scoring; Michigan
Tech. - Wylie (Bucman, McLay)
12:41. Michigan - MacDonald (Switz-
er, Watts) 14:31. Penalties: Michigan
Tech - Farrell (high sticking) 11:15;
Michigan - nayton (roughing) 11:15;
Michigan - McIntosh (high sticking)
11:56; Michigan Tech. - Kosiancic
(high sticking) 11:56; Michigan Tech.
-Wilson (slashing) 13:10; Michigan-
Gorley (elbowing) 13:50; Michigan
Tech. - R. Stenlund (elbowing)
13:50; Michigan - Hudson (tripping)
14:48.
SECOND PERIOD: Scoring:'Michi-
gan - Dozzi (MacDonald, Switzer)
1:19; Michigan Tech. - Coppo (Buc-
man) 16:36; Michigan Tech. - McLay
(unassisted) 19:58. Penalties: Michi-
gan - Wills (cross checking) 7:26;
Michigan Tech. - Wilson (tripping)
11:09; Michigan Tech. - Coppo
(handling puck) 16:48; Michigan -
White (holding) 16:48; Michigan
Tech. - Wylie (ooking) 18:17; Mich-
igan - Dozzi (cross checking) 19:05.
THIRD PERIOD: No Scoring; Pen-
alties: Michigan Tech. - Wylie (trip-
ping) 10:31; Michigan - Bochen (too
many men on the ice) 19:30.
Top Athlete
Ted Williams, the American
League batting champion, was
named male athlete of the year
by an Associated Press poll. Lew
Burdette, Milwaukee Braves' pit-
cher, was second in the poll, more
than 200 points behind Williams
in the voting.
The amazing Williams batted a
sizzling .388 last season to clinch
his fifth batting crown in his ma-
jor league career. It was also the
highest average ever recorded for
a player 39 years old or older.

ing was faster, but the score re-
mained 2-1 in Michigan's favor.
However, at 16:36, the puck was
deflected off a stick and it looped
into the Michigan net. Paul Cop-
po, one of Tech's many sopho-
mores, got credit for the tying
goal and Buchman also received'
his second assist of the night.
Tie-Breaker
Three and one-half minutes la-
ter, McLay scored what proved to
be the winning goal.
The loss now gives Michigan a
2-6 record in WIHL. The Wolver-
ines have dropped their last three
games, and tonight they will be
looking for their first win since
Dec. 20.
On the other hand, Michigan
Tech, which got off to a miserable
start in the WIHL, picked up its
second win of the season. The
Huskies have lost seven contests.

MAX PEARSON
... pins opponent

Michigan Faces Powers
In Swim Relays Today

then held the Wolverine at bay
the rest of the match.
Zervas Draws
Ihnat, a relative neweomer, pre-
served his team's three-point lead
by drawing with Zervas, 1-1, in a
match almost devoid of body con-
tact. Each wrestler escaped from
his respective disadvantage posi-
tion after only a few seconds, re-
sulting in the 1-1 score.
During the rest of the match,
neither contestant could solve the
other's defense. Had Zervas beaten
Ihnat bydecision, Michigan would
have tied the Hoosiers.
The first six matches followed a
set pattern: the more experienced
of the two matmen won each
match. Senior Jack Marchello,
wrestling competitively for the
first time this season, was the
bright spot for Michigan. He out-
classed Indiana veteran Norman
Komorowski, 6-0, in the 167-pound
encounter.
Other Michigan victories were
registered by Larry Murray at
130 pounds, and by Max Pearson
at 137. Murray allowed Indiana's
Fred Settina to make the first
takedown, but from there it was
all Murray, who won an 11-3 deci-
sion.
The Michigan grappler scored
many points on near falls during
the second and third periods, but
just could not put away his less
experienced opponent.
Don Morris made two quick
takedowns on Pearson and enjoyed
a 4-2 lead after the first period.
Then Pearson started getting to
his opponent and finally pinned

(Continued from Page 1)

him with 1:40 to go in the second.
Hoosier experience paid divi-
dends in the 123, 147, and 157-
pound encounters. Paul Bane's
two reversals and effective riding
technique enabled him to edge
Michigan sophomore Mike Hoyles,
4-3, at 123 pounds.
Veteran 147-pounder Nicl Pet-
ronka needed only 1:52 to put
away Michigan's Dick Summer-
will. Petronka enjoys the distinc-
tion of having beaten Iowa's NCAA
147-pound champion, Simon Rob-
erts, earlier this season.
Another seasoned Indiana grap-
pler, 157-pounder Tom Gallo, had
little trouble defeating Wolverine
sophomore Wayne King. Gallo
clamped a takedown and near-fall
on King near the start of the
match and dominated throughout.
The defeat was the second in a
row administered to Michigan at
Bloomington. On their last visit
two years ago, the Wolvreines were
edged, 19-18.
SUMMARIES
123-Bane (I) defeated Hoyles (M),
4-3
130-Murray (M) defeated Settina (I),
11-3
137-Pearson (M) pinned Morris (I)
4:20
147-Petronka (I) pinned Summerwil
(M), 1:52
157-Gallo (I) defeated King (M), 11-2
167-Marchello (M) defeated Komor-
owskl (I), 6-0
177-Redeker (I) defeated Lutomski
(M), 5-2
Hvwt-Zervas (M) and Ihnat (I)
drew, 1-1
COLLEGE BASKETBALL SCORES
Notre Dame 94, Valparaiso 69
Harvard 80, Columbia 61
Southern Methodist 84, Texas Tech 80
Dartmouth 63, Cornell 60
Brown 63, Princeton 57

By DICK MINTZ'
The Michigan swim team travels
to East Lansing this afternoon to
compete in the invitational Big
Ten Relay meet.
This meet is not a regularly,
scheduled Big Ten'swim event and
does not have any bearing on team
standings. In fact, because of
scheduling difficulties, only Ohio
State and Michigan State will
oppose the Wolverine swimmers.
Though no offieial team score will
be kept of the meet, the competi-
tion among these three swim pow-
ers promises to be heated,
Big Ten Champs
Michigan State, the Big Ten
Champion, has consistently been
the unofficial winner of the Re-
lays and Ohio State is always a
formidable competitorA.
Michigan, the N. C. A. A. cham-
pion, intends to assert the power
of its crown this afternoon. Coach
Stager has arranged the Michigan
line-up so that there is not a weak
link in the chain of races.
Nine relay events are scheduled,
covering all strokes at a variety
of distances; a rigid test of the
depth and versatility of the enter-
ed trio.
In the past, M. S. U. has over-
whelmed the opposition with its
display of great all - around
strength. Their powerhouse of

swimmers include Don Patterson,
Don Nichols, Dee Ettington and
Roger Harmon.
Strong Line-up
But this afternoon Michigan
boasts a line-up that could possibly
take a first in each event. Par-
ticularly powerful are the 400-yd.
freestyle team composed of Dick
Hanley, Carl Wooley, Leigh Corby
and Pete Fries and the 400-yd.
medley team. Wooley and Hanley
are in the medley, too, along with
Dick Adamski and Cy Hopkins.
Ohio State is sporting its usually
strong diving duo. Don Harper and
Glen Witten, respectively placing
second and fourth in the Olympics,
will combine their talents for the
board event.
Plaques will be awarded to the
individual winning relay teams.

WIHL STANDINGS
W L

i

LUCKY STRIKE

PF P)

Denver 8 2 13Y2
Colorado College G 4 9,z 5
MICHIGAN 2 6 4 10
North Dakota 3 1 4 2
Minnesota4 3 4 3
Michigan State 2 3 3 6
Michigan Tech 2 6 2 11
Last Night's Games
Minnesota 4, Michigan State 3
Michigan Tech. 3, Michigan 2

'A
1Y2

BRINGS YOU BIG TEN
BASKETBALL ON TV!
EVERY SATURDAY AT 4:30 E,S.T.
Jan. 11........Ohio State Feb. 8.........Minnesota
at Wisconsin at Wisconsin
Jan. 18.... Michigan State Feb.15...........Illinois
at Northwestern ' at Michigan State
Jan.25............Iowa Feb. 22.....Northwestern
at Minnesota at Michigan
Feb. 1...........Purdue Mar.1..........Purdue
at Michigan at Indiana
Mar8........... Indiana at Michigan State
See your local paper for channel

Gymnasts Meet Minnesota

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

In Big Ten Opener Today

A\p

<.

By HANA JANJIGIAN

e

The -Michigan gymnasts, who
were runners-up in the Big Ten
gymnastics championships held
last winter, will open their Con-
feren'e competition in a dual meet
against Minnesota here today at
4 p.m. in the main gym ofd the I-M
building.
The Gophers, who placed sixth
in the Big Ten meet, are seeking
to move back up to a spot near
the top. The Minnesota gymnasts
are under veteran coach Ralph
Piper, who has returned from a
year's leave of absence.
This meet will also be a master-
pupil rivalry since Michigan's
coach, Newt Loken, won NCAA
and Conference honors as a stu-
dent at Minnesota under the
coaching of Piper.
Led by Gagnier
The Wolverines will be led by
Ed Gagnier, Maize and Blue cap-
tain. Gagnier, one of the greatest
performers in his team's history,
is the top all-around man. He was
a member of Canada's Olympic
team and was last year's Big Ten

champion in the all-around, par-
allel-bars, and long horse events.
Providing more strength for the
Wolverines are Ed Cole, North-
South, National Junior AAU, and
last year's Big Ten trampoline
champ, Jim Hayslett, an outstand-
ing tumbler, and Nino Marion, who
placed second in the Canadian na-
tional meet in the all-around, par-
allel bars and high bar.
Other Performers
Other performers on the Michi-
gan team are trampolinists Chuck
Clarkson, Jack Eckle, and Frank
Newman, Canadian trampoline
champion.
Newcomers 'to Big Ten competi-
tion are Wolfgang Dozaur, sopho-
more gymnast from Germany, Bill
Skinner, Canadian national junior
champ,,Barry Feinberg, all-around
performer, and Al Stall.
Last year the Michigan team
blasted Minnesota, 70-41. This was
despite the absence of Gagnier,
who was ineligible, and Cole, who
was taking part in a swimming
meet.

I

I

__

I

PIZZA

Quickie Chickie will deliver their IMPROVED, fresh
from their new ovens, real ITALIAN PIZZA.
CALL NO 2-9944 . . . . . . . FREE DELIVERY

-
r

i

n

1i

Read Daily Classifieds

onQ SERVI1C E
Look for the Clown Special "inside your car"
and the Big Bass Drum trays for winter comfort.
at 3300 Packard. The food 'n you stay warm!
Ann Arbor's newest and
-c largest Drive-in Restaurant.
BIG TOP SPECIAL Lots of parking here!
Two patties of freshly
round Beef between TAKE-OUT SERVICE
ayers of a Toasted
S Double Deck Bun,a Some wonderful food, specially
I!ofGodn ele packaged in spotless cartons that

61S
SAL
CAR CO ATS
12 different makes of shortee coats,
domestic and imported. Tweeds, fleeces,
Lodens, wash 'n wear poplins, reversibles
with all types of warm linings
incliu'ina the new

WHAT IS A BIG METALS TYCOON?
DAVID ALEXANDER Steel Wheel
Kf. CAROLINA STATE
WHAT IS A POUCEMEN'S BALL?
KENAY URKHARDT. JR, Cop Hop
U. OF DETROIT
WHAT IS A POMPOUS BULLY?
O
JAMES rnS Stuffy Toughle
INDIANA STATE
TEACHER"S COLLEGE

WHAT I/$A 4M IN
BAND TMAT NVR67
. . -K.Y B EAK?
MEMO TO MAESTROS: is your band dawdling instead of
tootling? Is it full of feeble fifers aid drooping drummers?
Well, this musical slowdown may be traceable to lack of
Luckies. Better give your band a break-and make it a
Lucky one! A Lucky, you see, is a light smoke-the right
smoke for everyone. It's all cigarette-all naturally light,
wonderfully good-tasting tobacco.'And Luckies' fine to-
bacco is toasted to taste even better. Now then, what's a
marching band that never gets a Lucky break? Why, it's
a Sore Corps! (Wasn't that cymbal?)
5
STUCK FOR DOUGH?
START STICKLING! MAKE $25
We'll pay $25 for every Stickler we print-and for
hundreds more that never get used! So start Stickling-they're so
easy you can think of dozens in seconds! Sticklers are simple riddles
with two-word rhyming answers. Both words must have the same
number of syllables. (Don't do drawings.) Send 'em all with your # G A R
name, address, college and class to Happy-Joe-Lucky, Box 67A,
Mount Vernon, N. Y.

"'f
LU
SRIJ
Et T ES-----------

WHAT IS PUPPY LOVE?

WHAT'S A FRENCH BASKETBALL PLAYER?

WHAT ISA WELL-DRESSED BOXER7

WHAT IS A CLAIM JUMPErR?
VAA

I

11

1'

I 1

I 1

I #

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan