100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

V'Rir'nA&v T&viriAi*olv

FlUE MCHTGANflATLYt1j A x7 TANU'T!AM

Camp, Tour
Jobs Open
To Students
By JUDY SCHEINFELD
Hu ndr e d s of camp, resort,
pleasure boat and tour jobs are
open to students next summer.
"We have 4500 jobs in camps,
400 in Michigan alone," reports
Ward D. Peterson, assistantto the
Director of the Bureau of Ap-
pointments in charge of the Sum-
mer Placement Service.
Every kind of camp is repre-
sented including those for retard-
ed children, crippled children and
special camps for music, lan-
guage, riding andsailing.
All 'Students Eligible
The openings are available to
foreign students, married couples,
graduates and undergraduates. No
previous camping experience is
necessary but some training or
special interest in at least one
field such as life saving, arts and
crafts or nature study is prefer-
able. Camp sessions run from two
to eight weeks.
Many jobs are also available in
resorts this summer. "We have
300 resorts, East, West and in
Michigan in which to place stu-
dents," Peterson commented. "The
resort the farthest south is in
North Carolina." Boys can be bar-
tenders, bus boys or waiters. Girls
act as hostesses, maids, waitresses
'or baby sitters.
In addition to camp and resort
jobs, tour guide companies hire
students for work in Yellowstone
or Glacier National Parks.
Work on Boats
Pleasure boats also need stu-
dents. The S.S. Aquarama which
runs between Detroit and Cleve-
land employs student bartenders,
waiters and waitresses. The Lud-
ington Ferry running between
Ludngton and Milwaukee also
hires students.
In February Peterson will at-
tend a conference of the American
Camping Association to speak to
directors and owners of camps in
every state. He asks that all in-
terested students apply for jobs.
soon so he can take the applica-
tions with him.
Panel1 To Hold
Discussions
On Germany
A series of political discussions
and roundtable conferences will
be held in Detroit's Rackham
Auditorium today and. tomorrow.
The discussions on West Ger-
many and its relation to the na-
tlops of the world will be spon-
sored by the University, Michi-
gan State University, University
of Detroit and Wayne State Uni-
versity.
The panel members will include
leadihg experts in these fields
both from the United States and
West Germany. The areas under
discussion are political, economi-
cal and cultural.
The program will begin with an
address delivered by the German
ambassador to the United States,
Mr. Heinz L. Krekler, at 8:30 p.m.
today. Mr. Krekler will be wel-
comed by Detroit's mayor, Louis
C. Miriani.
The panel program begins at
9 a.m. tomorrow. The discussions
will be political in nature. In the
afternoon two panels on cultural

and economic affairs will take
place simultaneously from 2 to 4
p.m.
Among the University represen-
tatives to attend will be Prof.
James Pollock, chairman of the
political science department, and
Prof. Wolfgang Stolper, of the
economics department.
TONIGHT
TOMORROW
AT 8
Department of Speech
Presents
SYNGE'S
"TINKER'S
WEDDING"
SHAW'S
"THE
SHEWING-UP.
OF BLANCO
POSNET"
DAVIES'
"OVERLAID"

-Daily-Eric Arnold
DRESS REHEARSAL-Final preparations are made for the
speech department's presentation of "The Shewing-Up of Blanco
Posnet" by George Bernard Shaw to be given at 8 p.m. tonight'
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Two other one-act plays,
"The Tinker Wedding" by J. M. Synge and "Overlaid" by Robert-
son Davies, will complete the laboratory playbill.
Speeih Department Offers
Davies, 5m, Synge Play

State Opens
New Bypass
For US-23
By JAMES BOW
The final stretch of the four-
lane US-23 north of Ann Arbor
was opened to traffic today.
This three-mile addition by-
passing Whitmore Lake completes
a 101-mile project which is de-
signed as part of the expressway
from the Ohio Turnpike to the
Mackinac Straits Bridge. The ex-
pressway is scheduled for comple-
tion in five years.
The completion of the Whit-
,more Lake bypassunderscores the,
pfesent controversy in Ann Arbor
over the East Belt bypass. This
route was designed as part of the
Toledo-Mackinac expressway to
connect with the completed por-
tion of US-23 north of the city.
Owners Object
The Michigan State Highway
Commission reports that property
owners east of Ann Arbor have
objected to the East Belt route
which would pass through sev-
eral new subdivisions.
Ann Arbor citizens have called
the route unnecessary, arguing
that the existing South Belt high-
way and a short connecting route
could be used to carry noth-
south traffic around the city.
The Highway Commission sup-
ports the East Belt plan, saying
that the South Belt route would
be four miles longer than the
East Belt and would be over-
burdened with traffic from the
proposed Detroit-Chicago Ex-
pressway.
To Hold Hearings
Before the East Belt road con-
struction is scheduled, the State
Highway Commission will hold
hearings for Ann Arbor citizens on
the "economic effects of the proj-
ect on the city."
The University has already giv-
en its assent to the proposed route
of the East Belt, which will border
on North Campus.
The US-23 project north of Ann
Arbor cost $5,280,000 and bids
have been opened on US-23 wid-
ening between Ann Arbor and To-
ledo.
Construction is now under way
on another portion of US-23
north of Fenton. Completion of
this project is sc'heduled for
spring.
Organization
Notices
Latvian Student Club, monthly meet.
ing, Jan. 1 ,7:30 p.m., Room 3A, Union.
Congregational and Disciples Student
Guild, Friday's luncheon discussion,
Jan. 10, 12:00 noon, Guild House.

(Continued from Page 1)

Congress. Critics there have de-
manded stronger leadership and a
greater sense of urgency by the
administration in meeting the
challenge of Soviet advances in
space.
While the oratorical product
failed to satisfy everybody that
it packed enough punch and pow-
er, it evoked a surprisingly friend-
ly reception from Democratic
chieftains as well as the expected
approbation of Republicans.

that can give the American people
a confidence-just as real-in their
own security."
Voicing full confidence that
Congress and the American people
will "make this time of test a
time of honor," President Eisen-
hower included these eight points
-some new, some previously pro-
posed-in his call for action:
1. A reorganization of the de-
fense establishment. Whatever
harmful service rivalries exist, he
said, "America wants them stop-
ped." Congress gave him heavy
applause on that.
President Eisenhower left de-
tails for a special message later
on.

fiscal year starting July 1, "our
real purpose will be to achieve
adequate security."
8. Works of peace. In what he,
called a message from all Ameri-
cans to all other peoples, and es-
pecially the Russians, President
Eisenhower said:
"The world must stop the pres-
ent plunge toward more and more
destructive weapons of, war, ands

turn the corner that will start c
steps firmly on the path town
peace."
The President spoke up for
"program of science for peace
in which all the world would pc
its resources and brains' for "hi
man betterment." He invited Ru
sia to joiA acampaignto blot o
malaria and attack cancer a
heart disease.

i

EIGHT-POINT PLAN:
Sen. Johnson Asks Cooperation on Ike's Program

The speech department will pre-
sent a laboratory bill' of three
one-act plays at 8 p.m. tonight
and tomorrow in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
The plays to be presented in-
clude "The Tinkers Wedding" by
J M. Synge, "Overlaid" by Robert-
son Davies and "The Shewing-Up
of Blanco Posnet" by George Ber-
nard Shaw.
.Shaw's play, written in 1909, is
seldom performed. It is a satire
on the use of law in the early
West, with the, plot. revolving
around the capture and trial of a
horse thief. Herb Kline, '58, will
play Blanco Posnet, the desperado
of the territory who is on trial, and
Stephanie Fantle, '60, will play a
woman who wishes to testify
against him. ~
Hartweg Directs
"The Shewing-Up 'of Blanco,
Posnet" will be directed by Nor-
man Hartweg, Grad., with cos-
tumes and scenery by David
Johnston, '58A&D.
Robertson Davies, the author of
"Overlaid," is an associate of
Tyrone Guthrie of the Stratford
Music Groups,
To Perform
Concert Today
University Symphony Orchestra,
Michigan Singers and University
Symphony Band will perform as
a part of the 13th 'Annual Mid-
western Conference on, School
Vocal and Instrument Music at
8 p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
The Symphony Orchestra, con-
ducted by Prof. Josef Blatt of the
music school, will open the pro-
gram with Berlioz's "Symphonie
Fantastique." This selection will
be followed by Verdi's "Te Deum"
sung by the Michigan Singers un-
der the direction of Prof. Maynard
Klien of the music school.
Following an intermission, the
Symphony Band, conducted by
Prof. William D. Revelli of the
music school will play "Overture
to Le Roi d'Ys" by Lalo;. "Scherzo"
by Goldman; "The Magic Trum-
pet" by James Burke; "Toccata
Para Instruments de Percussion"
by Charvez and "Music for a
Festival" by Jacob.
S 0li d piI jlt Il pitl
Dial NO 2-2513
Hilarity
That
Refreshes !
COME ONE
COME ALL
COME OFTEN

Shakespearien Festival. They have
recently written a book, "Thrice
Hath the Trumpet Sounded."
"Overlaid," a successful Cana-
dian play, has been performed both
on the stage and as a CBC produc-
tion on the air. James Young,
Grad., Bonnie Kessler, '58, and
Richard Schiller, '59, will portray
the leading characters.
Give Folk Comedy
Jenette Faber, Grad., will direct
the play. The costumes were de-
signed by Kathryn Brock, Grad.,
and the scenery by Penelope Ram-
aker, Grad.
The third one-act play will be
"The Tinkers Wedding" by J. M.
Synge, a light 'folk comedy of the
Irish theatre. This play recently
closed a successful engagement in
a New York, off-Broadway theatre,
and is now on a national tour of
Canada.
Sara Fruchtbaum, '58, will play
a Tinker woma'n preparing for
marriage to Michael Byrne, por-
trayed by Richard Flasher, '59. In
her attempt at marriage she en-
counters many problems, including
her drunken mother, with Lor-
raine Small, '59, appearing in this
part.
Patrick Smith, '58, will direct
this seldom performed work, and
Mrs. Stewart Wagner designed the
scenery.

9

E

m

Friday Evening Service
Sponsored by
SIGMA DELTA TAU
SORORITY
Friday, Jan. 10 7:30 P.M.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

rl

TODAY t\1v
and ~ W~
Saturday 1I
FILMED ENTIRELY IN THE
SELDOM-SEEN CORNERS
Of THE REAL JAPANI
taewTECHNIRMSTECHNfCOLOR®
STARRINGe
TERESA WRIGHT. CAMERON MITCHELL
CO.STARRING
JON PROVOST = ROGER NAKAAWAwTmPHItIP OBER t UNIKO MIYAKE <

DIAL
NO 2-3136

v..' .14

COLOR CARTOON and SPORTS

. . . Starting SUNDAY . . .
Rock Hudson and Dorothy Malone
"THE TARNISHED ANGELS"

I

I

i

IN PERSON

JOSE

On Stage
MONDAY,
JANUARY 13
at 8:30 P.M.

enrri

I - ~

I

1

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan