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January 08, 1958 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1958-01-08

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"Don't You Ever Have Anything Fresh?"

I_

Sixty-Eighth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICHi. * Phone NO 2-3241

then Opinions Are Free
Truth Will Prevail"

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily ex press the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This nus t be noted in all reprints.

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Y, JANUARY 8, 1958

NIGHT EDITOR: JAMES BOW

The Hearts and Souls
...and the Minds of Men

e . .1.

First Semester
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITENURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
*CHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSICt
January 17 to January 28, 1958
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "time
of class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

''

JNIVERSITY REGENT Donald Thurber
cautioned Monday against sacrificing liberal
rts because of the expense'of scientific studies:
"The world-wide struggle against communism
for the hearts and souls, as well as the minds
f men. I believe that the countries that tri-
mph will have an educational system that
an supply the needs of the whole man and not
evelop him in just a technical sense."
Well, he's wrong. We need scientists. We
eed lots and lots of scientists to counter the
ussian threat, and the only way we can get
hem is with an all-out crash program in the
reat American tradition.
But where will we get the money for this?
.dditional funds from a traditionally tight-
sted legislature seem unlikely. And nobody is
oing to raise any taxes in the state, when
overnor G. Mennen Williams, who never does
nything unpopular, is chasing so many in-
ustries that they are falling over each other
o get out of the state-or so the Republicans
ay.
We can't get very much of the money from
he federal government-that's Communism.
nd anyway, what's more important, scientists
r a balanced budget? Everybody knows it's
be latter.
So let's streamline the liberal arts program
.nd invest our savings in scientists.
Certainly the University'can drop the history
epartment. All it teaches are the successes

and failures, the aspirations and despairs of
mankind. They won't win a war.
Certainly English ought to go. There is no
point in widening one's range of human ex-
perience, when you're working on things in-
humane.
Philosophy teaches careful analytical think-
ing. But that's nonsense. Nobody has thought
carefully in government for some time.
WE OUGHT TO TRIM down the behavioral
science programs which just study how
people behave. However we'd better hang on to
a few psychologists and sociologists who can
study effective methods of propaganda.
We also need a few economists to help keep
the budget bala'nced. But it's difficult to see
why anybody needs those courses in labor and
agriculture. The same goes pretty much for
political science.
Foreign languages could also stand a great
deal of reduction. All we need are people to
translate foreign countries' scientific docu-
ments people to act as interpretators at sum-
mit top-level conferences - and at prison
camps.
By cutting down in all these areas and put-
ting the savings into science and math the
United States could produce more scientists
than ever before. In fact if it goes about the
program conscientiously it might ever produce
'more scientists than the USSR.
Maybe they'll all kill each other too.
-RICHARD TAUB

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10
11
12
1
2
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8
9
10
11
1
2
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Time of Examination
Monday, January20
Friday, January 24
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Monday, January 27
Monday, January 27
Saturday, January 18
Tuesday, January 21
Tuesday, January 21
Saturday, January 25
Saturday, January 18
Thursday, January 23
Friday, January 24
Saturday, January 25
Thursday, January 23

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5

v

TUESDAY

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

16.

= Y7t9S$ 7'?bE SNIn[G.7G>ni O.S t'"' q~

* Classes beginning on the
preceding hour.

half hour will be scheduled at the

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
Hagerty Right, but Wrong
By DREW PEARSON

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

A Future Worthy of ELI's Past

9

THE UNIVERSITY'S English Language In-
stitute, Director Robert Lado says, has come
of age and is now the foremost such organi-
zation in the world.
To maintain this position, Prof. Lado con-
tinues, financial support from foundations is
needed. The Institute, founded less than 17
years ago, has acquired a world-wide influence
and reputation. It is well-known in teacher
training, language research, teaching methods
and English proficiency tests.
The proficiency tests, for example, were used
in 22 countries last year, being commended by
Drew Pearson in a recent column. Australian
government work with the many immigrants
that- country is assimilating at present is in-
debted to the ELI, employing such tests.-
Now, Prof. Lado believes, the Institute staff
and facilities must be expanded to cope with
the growing need for, teaching English. This
cannot be done with the existing budget.
More thane this, the director declares, there
is a real danger that the work done here by
its founder, Prof: Fries, and others since may
be undone by financial difficulties. Other uni-
versities, attempting - to establish similar

projects of their own, could scarcely be blamed
for taking advantage of any budgetary advan-
tage they might enjoy to hire away the already
trained' personnel of the ELI.
,ALL THE SPECIALIZED work the Institute
does is unquestionably of value to the Uni-
versity and its reputation, but it is, likewise
beneficial to the country as a whole. Trained
teachers of English, as speakers at an ELI
graduating banquet declared recently, can
teach 'more about this country than English.
Both in terms of good will 'and ease of com-
munication, spreading English is valuable.
The contribution of teaching English to
foreigners is, on the other hand, hard to justi-
fy to the Michigan taxpayer as worth more
money than now allotted.
Foundations would therefore seem a reason-
able source of aid. The University of Cali-
fornia has, for example, been given one million
dollars by the Rockefeller Foundation for Eng-
lish teaching work in the Philippines, work
which will employ methods developed right
here at the University English Language In-
stitute.
-THOMAS TURNER

JIM HAGERTY'S soothing-syr-
ups statement that the Gaither
Report showed the United States
was in no danger "at this time"
was technically correct, yet high-
ly misleading.
This column has seen the Gai-
ther Report and can state that it
contains a very revealing chart
giving the parallel military
strengths of the U.S. and USSR.
The chart shows that after
World War II, American military
strength dropped, ,then caught up
and surpassed Russia's during the
Korean War.,
But here is the danger which
worried the experts who prepared
the Gaither Report-most of them
Republicans-but which apparent-
ly does not worry Mr. Hagerty:
During the Eisenhower Adminis-
tration, the chart shows Ameri-
can military strength dropping
from its previous strong position
to a parallel sposition with Russia
as of today. Thus Hagerty was
technically correct when he used
the words "at this time."
* * *
HOWEVER, the chart shows
that at tht present rate of Ameri-
can and Russian production,
American military strength drops,
rapidly below Russia's from now
on.
The Russian military curve goes
up. The American curve goes down.
Within a year, the United States
will be dangerously behind Russia.
And since it takes two years or
more for new bombers, new sub-
marines, and new missiles to get
into production, it will take at
least two years to reverse and
remedy the Amnerican military
downcurve-despite the compla-
cency of Mr. Hagerty. This is as-

suming, of course, that Russia
stands still.
Note-It will be during the next
two years, when Russia has a
military advantage, that the Unit-
ed States will face a grave danger
of preventive war.
Capital News Capsules - Con-
gressman Jack Brooks of Texas
has put his brother on the govern-
ment payroll as staff director of
the Government Operations Sub-
committee investigating the intri-
cate problem of a big government
nickel contract to Freeport Sul-
phur in Cuba.
Mr. Brooks is a good congress-
man, has saved the tax-payers a
lot of money. But some people are
wondering what his brother, Ed-
ward C. Brooks, can know about
nickel, when for the past three
years he was music and drama
critic for the New Orleans Times-
Picayune. His brother is drawing
$12,500 a year®. .
CONGRESSMEN are probing to
see what John Hay Whitney, ex-
chairman of Freeport Sulphur,
now American ambassador to
Great Britain, may have had to
do with the very lush contract
given by the Eisenhower Admin-
istration to Freeport Sulphur. Mr.
Whitney was one of Ike's 'biggest
campaign contributors, got his am-
bassadorial reward last year.
America's greatest danger-Cen-
tral Intelligence regards Russian
submarines as a much greater
danger than the long-range ICBM
. Russia now has 600 subma-
rines, far more modern subs than
ours. She has subs which can slip
.up to our coast and fire missiles
750 miles inland without even

coming to the surface. We would
have no idea they were present.
The Russians are now testing a
missile which can be fired 1200 to
1800 miles, also from under water.
Our big Air Force base at Tripoli,
North Africa, biggest outside the
United States, could be put out of
commission in 15 minutes by Rus-
sian subs.
The cities of Pittsburgh, Bir-
mingham, Buffalo, Cleveland, are
all vulnerable to submarine at-
tack, to say nothing of those along
the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.
All this is why the U.S. Navy
will start building anti-subma-
rines, in other words, Killer-subs
which can prowl underneath the
water. They will be equipped with
fantastic, new submarine-to-sub-
marine torpedos. But they will not
be completed for two years . .
In contrast to Russia's 600 subs,
Hitler had only 49 at the start of
World War II. He nearly knocked
out Allied shipping.
* * *
NO MANAGEMENT supervision
-Arthur Goldberg, special coun-
sel for the AFL-CIO, has lodged
an angry complaint at Secretary
of Labor Mitchell for deliberately
discriminating against labor in his
proposals for new labor laws. The
AFL-CIO recommended creating a
Commissioner of Labor and Man-
agement Reports, who would check
on both union and company fi-
nance - since many companies
have have sole jurisdiction over
welfare funds. But Secretary
Mitchell adopted only half of the
recommendation; proposed only a
Commissioner of Labor Reports,
with no supervision of manage-
ment.
(Copyright 1958 by Bell Syndicate, Inc.)

Botany 2
Chemistry 3, 5E, 15, 182
Economics 71, 72
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 153
English 23, 24
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31, 32
Geology 11,
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 35
Physics 53
Psychology,190
Russian 1, 31
Sociology 1, 4, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
3014, 301S, 401, 401M,
40-4S

Monday, January 20
Monday, January 27
Thursday, January 23
Saturday, January 25
Friday, January 17
Tuesday, January 28
Monday, January 20
Wednesday, January 22
Thursday, January 23
Friday, January 17
Tuesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 28
Wednesday, January 22

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5

'S

Thursday, January 23 7-10 p.m.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Bus. Ad. 11, 12 Thursday, January 23 2-5

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Ch.-Met. 1, Lee B and D
Ch.-Met. 11
C. E. 21, 151
C. E. 22
C. E. 133, 141
Drawing 1, 33
Drawing 2, 21
Drawing 11
E. E. 5
E. M. 1
E. M. 2
English 11
I. E. 100, 120
M. E. 2
M. E. 132
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 301S, 401, 401M,
401S

Tuesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 28
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 21
Monday, January 20
Wednesday, January 22
Tuesday January 28
Monday, January 20
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Friday, January 17
Friday, January 17
Thursday, January 23
Wednesday, January 22

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

WHAT OTHERS ARE THINKING:
The Magicg of Their Singing

Thursday, January 23 7-10 p.m.

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following guest editorial
Was written by Mrs. Doris Kirk Holmes, an instruc-
tor in the freshman English department and the
wIfe of Tufts poet, Professor John Holmes. She took
her undergraduate work at the University of Michi-
gan. The editorial is reprinted from The Tufts
Weekly.
ARE YOU HAVING FUN ,in college? This
may seem to be a frivolous question for a
faculty member to put to undergraduates. More
proper inquiry is, have you chosen your major,,
are you adjusted to the group, what do you
intend to do after graduation, is your religious
situation satisfactory, are you maturing at a
normal rate? But, I repeat, are you having fun
in,college?
Is the double freedom-liberation of the
mind and liberation of social behavior-making
in you a heightened response to the world? Is
this responsibility to distinguish liberty from
license, inspiration from entertainment, work
from busy-work, intoxicating you as it should?
Life and love, health and youth, do they drown
your feelings of inadequacy? Is the excitement
of your very vigor contagious? Can you feel it
in the fraternity house, the dormitory? Does it
seem to generate even in the MTA?
Do you love: some people, something you're
reading, something you're doing?-
Or is it a business proposition? It costs so
much. You have to put into it so many required
hours. You wear such and such: a little indi-
viduality, but nothing to suggest deviation. A
balanced program of studies; a balanced social
life; a balanced wardrobe; a balanced diet like
a balanced budget.
BUT THIS BALANCE-what system of ac-
counting are you using? In cost accounting,
what is the cost? What is your cost? What
pIN

is the cost of balance, what is the price of
well-roundedness? Is coolness worth it? You
may be outfitted to fit in, but don't pay all for
that goal, or you may have a fit.
This is such a student-ridden community
that being a collegiate may have little special-
ness any more. In tie thirties, in New York, in
Ann Arbor, in Boston, there was an aura, an
atmosphere, energy, about any gathering-place
of students, public or private. Is there still?
Are there joints, hangouts, colorful,, half re-
spectable, where you congregate? Where do
Tufts students gather spontaneously? There
must be such places, arid there's a sermon in
them.
What makes the life of students exciting?
Is it license, alcohol, sex? Certainly. Those are
always disturbing, exciting to anybody. But
what is different, special, unique, about student
life? The answer is so trite that I may be called
guilty of belaboring the obvious, of riding the
cliches that we're always talking about in
freshman English.
The special quality of student life is its
attending, if only briefly, imperfectly, inter-
mittently, the life of the mind. That is the
gravity that affects this atmosphere we're con-
sidering. The great potential -of the human
intellect should surprise and seize if only
briefly, during these years. This is the secret.
This is the bond. This is the universal tie of
all students all over the world. Nous devenons
tous freres sous les lois de Minerve. Or is all
this dated, old-fashioned? Unbecomingly emo-
tional, romantic, sentimental? After all, you
have the word "egg-head" which suggests that
any student who admits to intellectual concern
is disliked, or distrusted.
It may be that the current, apparent rejec-
tion of the mind is a good thing. It may be a
modesty that finds the intellectual a preten-
tious fellow, posturing type. Or it may have
more deeply spiritual origins: the rejection of
the mental may be a religious vision that sees

IMPACT OF THE SPUTNIKS:
U.S. Technical Progress Analyzed

(Editor's Note: The following is a
reprint of an article which appeared
recently in The Rensselaer Poly-
technic, student newspaper of Rens-
selaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy,
N.Y.
(The author, Dr. V. Lawrence Par-
segian, is Dean of the School of
Engineering at Rensselaer, and ac-
(crding to The Polytechnic, has had
considerable experience in govern-
mental scientific agencies.)
By DR. V. L. PARSEGIAN
THE SPUTNIKS have deeply in-
jured our pride and self-satis-
faction. Fortunately the shock did
not come after the manner of
Hiroshima; there is time to benefit
from the experience.
Contraryato general impression,
United States' failure to match
Soviet progress did not result pri-
marily from shortage of men or
money, or from inter-service ri-
valry, but largely from failure to
utilize available scientific man-
power. This, in turn, came about
because we have not yet achieved a
governmental system which is ade-
quately strong and still suited to
the needs of a "free" society,
IT IS INTERESTING to note
that all the areas in which we
h.a,, .itha',.f.11P,, hchivnr~li or . ain v

search projects are all being run
under secrecy control. College fac-
ulty as a rule avoid secret projects,
which discourage free interchange
and open research, and which they
cannot freely share with students.
These faculties, from which most
Nobelists come, constitute a vast
potential for ideas and original re-
search, but at the present time
only a very small fraction of them
even know what are the specific
bottlenecks on the rocket, the
atomic or other secret projects, let
alone contributing to their solu-
tion.
Even when they are "cleared"
for secret work, they prefer to take
on only unclassified', projects,
which the government' also sup-.
ports but which have only "first-
cousin" or lesser value to the main
projects.
WE SEE THIS demonstrated
even now on the project for ther-
monuclear fusion of light atoms
to generate power. This is the next
big scientific "first" which may
pass the Sputniks in significance.
The technical problems demalid
many new ideas and extensive ba-
cir, rPt5'~r"2 wfh icih n a fAa 1 4fnr

comply with administrative rules.
It became a divisive and corros-
ive force.
The last few decades have given
great authority and responsibility
to our central government. There
seems to be no proper alternative
to this, even though "free" society
must usually give up a proportion-
ate measure of freedom.
Our most serious problem is to
develop improved concepts and
methods for govertimental pro-
cesses that will better meet the
needs of a free society in a hostile
world.
The most immediate need is to
revise governmental methods to
bring the support of scientists to
our main projects. In the case of
atomic energy this requires a
change in the spirit and provisions
of the Act of 1954.
* * * . .
A FURTHER NEED is to im-
prove the educational processes in
secondary schools and in colleges.
It is :doubtful that the numbers
of engineering graduates should
be greatly increased to match the
Russian output, however, since our
economy cannot support such
numbers. But we do need consid-

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of 'conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 W. E. between December 10
and 20 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board of the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which the
Michigan Daily assumes no editori-
al responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.

tended hours of restricted use will be
by the Ann Arbor Police Department,
Fire lanes, drives, dock areas and oth-
er no parking zones throughout the
Campus will alto be patrolled by the
Police Department and violators of es-
tablished regulations will be issued vio-
lation notices.
The parking lots affected are: Lot No.
34 between the Chemistry and Natural
Science Buildings; Lot No. 33 at the
Waterman Gymnasium on East Univer-

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