100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 08, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SDAY, JANUARY k 1958

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAoE

~DAY, JANUARY R, 1958 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

iichigan Icers Play
7olverines Seek To Extend
Viu Streak over Spartans

Ill U

at E. Lansing

Toni gh

M' Overcomes Road Jinx
Against Western Opponents

By SI COLEMAN
Michigan will attempt to start
s drive for a playoff position to-
ght when it travels to East Lan-
ng to engage Michigan State at
p.m.
The game will be broadcast on
'UOM, beginning at 7:55 p.m.
At the present time, the Wol-
rines- are tied for third place in
e W e s t e r n Intercollegiate
ockey League with North Da-
ota.
The Spartans, with a win and
free losses, are one point away
om last place, but when these
vo teams meet, standings and
cords must be tossed out the
indow.
Long Rivalry
There is, an age-old rivalry
dsting b e t w e e n, tlese -two
,hools, and it is as fierce and just
unpredictable as the football
ivalry.
No ~doubt exists that Michigan
as dominated this series for quite

some time. In a 29-year span, the
Wolverines have managed to win
33 consecutive games against the
Spartans, but not many of those
victories were easily accomplished.
The results of last season's four
games between the two schools
give proof of the keen competition
afforded by Michigan State.
The Wolverines were victorious
in all four contests, but each one
was a battle down to the wire, and
one goal was the margin of vic-
tory in each game.
Top Scorer Back
Returning from last year's
Michigan State squad is the lead-
ing scorer from that team, Ross
Parke. Parke is one of 15 letter-
men that have returned, and
should be one of the key men in
the Spartan's attack.
Coach Amo Bessone will have
goalie Joe Selinger back for his
second season of action. Selinger
is regarded as one of the finest
netminders in the league.

By BOB ROMANOFF
Vacation didn't stop the Michi-
gan basketball team as it invaded
four schools during the holiday
period and appeared to overcome
their fabled road jitters.
Using the heavy artillery of
M. C. Burton and Pete Tillotson,
the Wolverines gained three wins,
although at the outset of the trip
they were almost wiped out by
Butler, 85-65, and Wyoming, 88-76.
Tillotson was high man in the
Butler defeat with 17 points.
Against Wyoming, played in the
new New Mexico Field House, he
netted 23 points while teammate
Burton took Wolverine honors with
25. Tony Windis, Wyoming guard,

OPPOSING GOALIES-Michigan's Ross Childs and Joe Selinger
of Michigan State will be in the nets tonight as the Wolverines
and Spartans renew their hockey rivalry.

I-M CAGE OPENERS:
Phi Delts, Kappa Alphas Rout Foes

£iBYvt4 MCmAment
BY JIM BAAD

For the Doubters
SINCE THE INCEPTION of the Big Ten's Basis of Need Aid Plan,
I have been a constant defender of its principles and purpose,
but quite frankly never had an answer to the army of perennial
doubters' persistent arguings that the Conference had no way to
cheek on such a project as this.
The presence of the neutral committee which determines the
amount of aid an athlete needs seemed to make no difference. "The
. "oaches or parents could pad their reports to the committee," was
the answer. "Alumni could easily slip in contributions and the Con-
ference would never know about it" was another favorite phrase of
the un-believers.
Ignorant of exactly what the Big Ten had in the way of a "police
force" for its new plan, I could never come up with a satisfactory an-
swer. Finally, tired of groping, I wrote the Conference for the facts.
Assistant Commissioner William Reed supplied the answers in the
following letter, an excellent summation of the Big Ten's efforts to
keep its Aid Plan laundry clean.
"Perhaps the most pertinent thing that can be said concerning
the administration and policing of the financial aid plan is that at
the outset the presidents and faculty representatives of the Confer-
enee directed, and the Commissioner pledged, a program of strict
compliance. In effect, a line'was drawn by the radical re-definitions
of financial aid policy contained in the legislation which became ef-
fective last February. It was then possible to undertake such a pro-
gram of strict compliance.
"The Commissioner developed for this purpose an investigative
arm which I think is without parallel in intercollegiate athletics. We
have on retainer a chief investigator who is a former Conference
athlete and official, and who is FBI trained. He in turn has devel-
oped a network of correspondents who are likewise interested in
athletics, have FBI investigative training, and are willing to make
field investigations on our behalf in their local areas in a manner
which is both economical to us and efficient because they can pro-
vide dispatch.
An Examiner .. .
"IN addition, the Conference has employed an examiner. His func-
tions include investigative work but not in the field nor, in all
likelihood, on the basis of a specific complaint of allegation. His
primary function is to visit the Conference schools and to examine
their procedures in providing financial assistance to athletes.
"He also has the benefit of Statements of Financial Support
which each varsity athlete and each prospective athlete (defined as
one who earns a freshman award) must submit to this office. By
correlating these statements with the records of tenders we have,
and by scrutiny of the sources of support, he is in a position to spot
questionable cases which he then will, pursue upon the occasion of
his visits to the schools.
"In general it has been the policy of the Commissioner to overlook
no report of an allegation of suspected violation of the financial aid
rule, whether it has come in the form of a formal complaint or in
the form of a rumor such as some newspaper statement, or our own
suspicions developed through the miscellaneous assortment of infor-
mation anyone in this business acquires with regard to recruiting
and financial aid practices.
Some Cases for Inquiry . ..
"SINCE February 22, 1957,..there have been 18 separate cases which
merited what we would term a full inquiry. One of these was the
Dickens case, which originated with- rumors which came to our at-
tention from numerous sources, as well as formal complaints from
Big Ten and other schools, and which involved field investigations
of considerably more than 20 individuals.
The 18 cases also included the instance of a boy whom an in-
formant had reported was receiving aid on 'the basis of the Parents
Statement, which was a misrepresentation of fact. This boy was de-
clared ineligible for his entire collegiate career.
"Not included in the number were a series of spot checks on the
validity of Parents Financial Statements, which we conducted as a
matter of routine in about four percent of all cases and which last
year developed only one case of an inaccurate statement. This had
no effect since the school to whom the boy was applying was in-
formed and they withheld his tender."
Assistant Commissioner Reed ended his letter with the conclu-
sion that although it is next to impossible to quell all the popular
cynicism regarding conduct in athletics, he feels the Big Ten is mak-
ing a thorough and conscientious effort to assure compliance with the
new aid program. I have to agree with him wholeheartedly and now
feel better armed to meet a few of the cynics myself.
I.C.C. Presents
TOM LEHRER
and

By TOM WITECKI
One sided games dominated the
scene last night as the social fra-
ternity "A" basketball league
opened its '58 season at the I-M.
building.
Don Coleman scored 22 points
as Kappa Alpha Psi rolled to an
easy victory over Phi Sigma Kap-
pa. The Kappa Alphas displayed
great team speed and strong re-
bounding by Center Don Porter.
Phi Delta Theta, led by Bob
Dunlap who scored 24 points, wal-
loped Sigma Phi, 70-5. With a
team averaging well over six feet
in height, the Phi Delts complete-
ly dominated the backboards.
Lambda Chi Alpha racked up
43 points in the first half and
coasted' to a 56-26 win over Tau
Kappa Epsilon. In two more run-
away contests, Sigma Nu routed
Pi Lambda Phi, 71-11, and Delta
Sigma Phi crushed Triangle,
65-22.
Evans Webb of Phi Gamma Del-
ta scored 24 of his team's 44 points
In their 44-33 victory over Phi
Epsilon Pi. Sigma Phi Epsilon,
last 1 year's champions, started
where they left off last year by
turning back a stubborn Alpha
Epsilon Pi squad, 45-19.
North Eleven
Starts Drills
MOBILE, Ala. WP) - Two Michi-
gan State teammates moved into
starting offensive positions for the
North team yesterday as both
squads began intensive work for
Saturday's Senior Bowl football
game.
Yankee Coach Joe Kuharich
of the Washington Redskins had
Jim Ninowski, Michigan State's
slick quarterback, directing the
No. 1 unit most of the time in
dummy scrimmage.
Others in the No. 1 backfield
most of the time were Walt Ko-
walczyk, Ninowski's running mate;
Mike Sommer, George Washing-
ton; and Ray Nitschke, Illinois.

In one of the evening's closer
contests, Si Coleman scored 12
points in Tau Delta Phi's 29-17
win over Psi Upsilon.
OTHER SCORES
Theta Chi 28, Delta Upsilon 24
Alpha Tau Omega 32, Phi Kap-
Pa Sigma 16
Acacia 29, Delta Chi 21
Sigma 'Chi 52, Phi Kappa Tau 23
Delta Tau Delta 51, Alpha Sig-,
ma Phi 16

Chi Psi 39, Delta Kappa Epsilon
19
Beta Theta Pi 29, Kappa Sigma
28
Trigon 19, Theta Xi 18
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 32, Sigma
Alpha Mu 24
Alpha Delta Phi 69, 'Zeta Psi 32
Phi Sigma Delta 31, Zeta Beta
Tau 22
Chi Phi over Theta Delta Chi
(forfeit)

was Michigan's downfall with 33.
Like a true military strategist,
Coach Bill Perigo made a change
in his forces after-this setback. He
shifted George Lee to forward and
inserted sophomore Terry Miller
in the vacated guard position.
Lack Center
Perigo cited the need of another
high scoring forward as the cause
of the shift. He would have pre-
ferred to move Tillotson to the
forward slot but had no one to
move into the pivot.
With the new lineup Michigan
attacked New Mexico and came
away with a 78-66 victory. Burton
and Tillotson again provided the
fire-power with 23 and 19 points
respectively.
Two days later Michigan in-
vaded Arizona. When the smoke
cleared the home team had fallen,
88-76, high scores-Burton, 20,
and Tillotson, 18, again.
New Year's eve the team arrived
back in Ann Arbor at 10:30 p.m.
to prepare for the opening cam-
paign of the Big Ten season. On
New Year's day while most people
were recovering from the night
before, Perigo's squad held two
practice sessions at 10 a.m. and
2 p.m.
Fly to Iowa City
On the morning of January 3,
the cagers flew to Iowa City. That
afternoon they held another prac-
tice. The next morning they held
a light drill. When night came
they advanced to the front lines
for the first of 14 Conference
games.
The Iowa fort failed to hold as
Michigan won, 73-65.
Monday Michigan hosted Wis-
consin. Despite the fact they won,
70-49, Perigo said, "Wisconsin has
a good team that will win games."
He cited the fact that they beat
Butler and only lost to Utah who
is rated in the top 20 by a slim two
point margin.
BIG TEN STANDINGS

Landstro, Stanger ,.Excel~
At Holiday Track Meet

BACK AT FORWARD--Michigan's George Lee (35) who started
the year at forward and was then shifted to guard was put back
in the forward slot by Bill Perrigo who needed another high
scorer upfront.
This Week in Sports
Wednesday, January 8
HOCKEY-MICHIGAN STATE-there
Friday, January 10
HOCKEY-MICHIGAN TECH-here, 8 p.m.
WRESTLING-INDIANA-there
Saturday, January 11
HOCKEY-MICHIGAN TECH-here, 8 p.m.
BASKETBALL-NORTHWESTERN-there
WRESTLING-ILLINOIS-there
SWIMMING-BIG TEN RELAYS-East Lansing
GYMNASTICS-MINNESOTA-here, 4 p.m.
THE GREATEST VACATION
OF YOUR LIFE
"THE PARISIAN SPECIAL"
A Summer Student Tour of Europe
73 DAYS - 13 STATES AND COUNTRIES
(featuring Brussels' World Pair)
No rushing from Spain to Scandinavia with on
"amateur" tour-escort. "The Parisian Special" is
a REAL VACATION TOUR conducted by an ex-
perienced Parisian tour-conductor.
NO MIDDLE MAN: Contact directly the man who
will conduct the tour. For Real Fun and Culture
with the greatest Student Summer Tour of Europe
WRITE or CALL:
Maurice JONAS
813 E. Kingsley
ANN ARBOR
NO 3-9229

By JIM BENAUGH
Landstrom is back!
The 1956 Big Ten pole vault
champion, Eeles Landstrom,
showed Michigan track followers
that he still has his winning form
by towering 14'6" to lead some
fine performances by Coach Don
Canham's thinclads in the Uni-
versity of Chicago Track Club's
Holiday Meet, December 28.
Lan d s tr o m, a husky blond
junior, who stayed out of school
last year as a member of the Fin-
nish Army and also Finland's
Olympic team, tied for first place.
Six Wolverines, all competing un-
attached, placed in the meet.
Highly Rated
Fred Montour, rated one of the
most promising distance men ever
to come to Michigan, blazed to a

1:57.0 half mile - good for sec-
ond place. He is a transfer, sitting
out a year of residence.
Pete Stanger increased Michi-
gan's hopes in the hurdles by
dashing through the lows in a
winning time of :07.7 and taking
third in the highs.
Shot putter, Ermin Crownley, a
sophomore, and high jumper,
Mamon Gibson, took second places
while two-miler Geert Keilstrup
placed fourth.
Crownley, who put the shot over
50' as a freshman last year,
needed only a 484" toss for his
runner-up spot.
Gibson was a surprise second in
the high jump. He is known main-
ly as a pole vaulter, an event in
which he finished fourth in last
year's Big Ten indoor meet.

W.
MICHIGAN.......2
Minnesota.........1
Ohio State ....... 1
Illinois........... 1
Iowa............. 1
Purdue........... 1
Indiana...........1
Michigan State .. 0
Northwestern . 0
Wisconsin........ 0

L.
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
2

Pct.
1.000
1.000
1.000
.500
.500
.500
.500
.000
.000
.000

Monday's Scores
MICHIGAN 70, Wisconsin 49
Purdue 68, Indiana 66
Iowa 70, Illinois 68

DANCE AT THE UNION
BLUE BOOK BLUES
MUSIC by
Jim Servis' Orchestra

- - A Campus-to-Careerq Case H-istory
4 -
... . .. T:: iv. "'r' 5 9:; f^Tv~ ~ "I
-7
- e ~' ~{
{ ".'.'.
3 I

Sat., Jan. 11
9-12

Union Ballroom
$1.50 per couple

i
t
F
E
i
I
1
i
i
1
i
I
1
I
1
I
1
t
N
i
.1
t
I
t
i
t
1
t
t
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
f
1
1
t
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
t
e

John Reiter (right)' discusses the route of signals from the
wave guide through the IF stages of a microwave receiver.

"This was the kind of challenge I was looking for"

Here's what John A. Reiter, Jr., B.S.
in Electronics, Arizona State College,
'54, says about the biggest project so far
in his Bell System career.
"This was the kind of challenge I was
looking for-a chance to assist in plan-
ning a microwave radio relay system
between Phoenix and Flagstaff, Arizona.
Five intermediate relay stations would be
needed, and I began by planning the
tower locations on 'line of sight' paths
after a study of topographical maps.
Then I made field studies using altimeter
measurements, and conducted path-loss
tests to determine how high each tower
should be. This was the trickiest part of
the job. It called for detecting the pres.

transmission route, and determining
measures necessary to avoid their effects.
"Not the least part of the job was
estimating the cost of each of the five
relay stations. All told, the system will
cost more than $500,000. When con-
struction is finished in December of this
year, I'll be responsible for technical
considerations in connecting the radio
relay and telephone carrier equipment.
"This assignment is an example of the
challenges -a technical man can find in
the telephone company. You take the job
from start to finish-from basic field
studies to the final adjustments-with
full responsibility. To technical men who
want to get ahead, that's the ultimate

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan