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November 24, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE ?MICHIGAN DAILY

ODETTA COMMENTS:
College Interest Aids
Folk Music's Growth
By THOMAS TURNER
Friday and Saturday, Odetta kept
The field :of folk music is grow- very busy.
ing, Odetta said, and the interest Entertains Children
shown on college campuses is a Yesterday she took her guitar
prime factor. to the childrens psychiatric hos-
Odetta, the energetic Alabama- pital for a half hour performance
born folksinger, was in Ann Arbor for the patients. In the afternoon
for her concert Friday night. she watched the football game.
Speaking over a cup of coffee at "I've become interested in foot-
the Union, she outlined differ- ball all of a sudden," Odetta ad-
ences between the folk-music field mitted. "When I was in Toronto, I
and what she calls the "glamour rooted for their team and they
and glitter show-business."'
In different cities, Odetta said,
there are clubs or restaurants
where show-people get together
in "fraternity atmosphere. "They"
sit around," she explained,. "talk-f
ing about who's doing what, who's
wearing what. It's all pretty shal-
low." N

'U' Studies Rehabilitation
Of State's Elderly Patients

11

If a new University .research
project proves successful, elderly
patients in countyhmedical care
facilities will soon have a chance
to get about more on their own.
Conducted by the University
Division of Gerontology, in colla-
boration with the Department of
Physical Medicine and Rehabilita-
tion of the medical school, the
project is designed to show what
comprehensive rehabilitative care
can do for patients over 45 years
old.
"Each year, growing numbers of
disabled and chronically ill older
people are being admitted to our
public and private nursing homes
where, for the most part, they are
needlessly relegated to the hopeless
status of increasing physical, psy-
chological, and financial depend-
ency," explained project co-direcc-
tors Wilma Donahue; chairman of
the Division of Gerontology and
Dr. Janies Rae, chairman of the
Department of Physical Medicine
and Rehabilitation.
Includes Paid Work
Scheduled to run 18 months, the
project includes several major
phases. A one-week training in-
stitute will take place for staff
members and public officials of
the county facilities.
Consultation by a team, of ex-
perts will help each facility estab-
lish its own rehabilitation pro-
gram. There will be inauguration

of paid work opportunities for
patients in each facility.
Physical, psychological and vo-
cational status of patients in each
institution before and after the
program will be assessed, and com-
parison of these data with results
at a matched group of facilities
having no rehabilitation programs
will be compiled.
Plan Consultations
Finally, there will be consulta-
tion with the communities con-1
cerned to help them provide for
rehabilitated patients who are dis-
charged from the facilities.
Experiments elsewhere have
shown that up to one fourth the
patients in county medical fa-
cilities may be discharged to their
homes, often with jobs in their
community, following such a pro-
gram. Costs for a continuing re-
habilitative program can run as
low as $.50 a patient per day.
"If the tide of mounting num-
bers of chronically ill and disabled
older people is to be stemmed,
comprehensive programs of re-
habilitation must become common
knowledge and practice," Mrs.
Donahue explains.
Financed by a grant of $39,000
from the United States Office of
Vocational Rehabilitation, the new
project will be conducted first in
the Jackson County Medical Care
Facility.

i
i ,:
t '
:
.,. e

4

DAYS

ifO )O wish to s
Personalized

CHRISTMAS CARDS
from,
THE LARGEST COLLECTION OF
UNUSUAL. CARDS IN ANN ARBOR
at
CHESTER ROBERTS GIFTS
SShopping Days 312 S. Stat

-Daily-Ronald Sossi
CTICE-Rehearsal for "Kiss Me Kate," this year's
on, is well under way. Dancers spend at least five
polishing their eight numbers in preparation for

1i.

P

Performers Show

'usiasm for Production

4.>

y LANE VANDERSLICE
sket is going great guns.
husiasm and satisfaction
.ts progress is evident as the
rs whistle the show tunes
they have gone through their
es. The general chairman
oq-chairmen sit on the stage
Union ballroom with satis-
miles on their faces.
s going so well," everyone
and they say it almost con-
y-to each other and to the
er that wanders into re-
al. It is going well. According
in Moore, '58, Musket Gen-
hairman, the.show is a week
r along than last year.
Ahead of Schedule
don't think we started the
:d act before Thanksgiving
ear," said Sandra Sol, '58,
way ahead of last year."
e've got three whole weeks,"
McRitchie, '59, said, as if he
n't quite believe it. Musket
'Kiss Me Kate," opens Dec.
ording to the rehearsal
ule, no cast member prac-
less than three times a week.
ancers, with eight important
ers, rehearse five or six, and
eryoige, the rehearsal sched-
lay be increased in the re-
ng weeks.
Fveryone Happy
ryone, from Moore to one of
'reshmen on the show, is-
about everything. Dude
nson, the director? ,"Great,"]
derful to work for," "Couldn't'

be better." The show itself? Cast
members are still whistling the
songs and laughing at the jokes
after six weeks, a sign that they
think it will be more- than just'
"Another Opening, Another-
Show," the' opening song in "Kiss
Me 'Kate."
And everyone: feels the same
way about the other people re-
sponsible for the musical. LouAnn
Rosengarten, '59, the choreo'gra-
pher and Don Young, Spec., chorus
director, come in for special men-
tion by Musket members.
Probably the project that excites
the most interest around the Mus-
ket office is the premiere planned
for Dec. 11. The two big problems
now are obtaining spotlights and
a red carpet, but the officers ex-
pect 'that these will be solved in
time for opening night.
TV Show Studies
'Why People Write'
Four writers will explore reasons:
why people write, on the Univer-
sity's television series, "Close-up,"
tomorrow at 8 p.m. on WPAG-TV,
Channel 20 in Ann Arbor.
Nancy Willard, '58, an award
winner in the 1957 Hopwood
Award Contest, William Dawson,
a local resident who is a profes-
sional writer, Mrs. William Hurtu.
bise, housewife, and Mrs. Lawrence
Steiner, wife of a University stu -
dent, will discuss the topic.

Folk Music Grapevine
Folk music, she said in-contrast,
has a grapevine and when a singer
visits a city he "bunks" in some-
one's house-on the floor or in a
bed.
All the folksingers present, she
continued, sing together and ar-1
gue. "We call it discussing," she
interjected by way of explanation.
Therefore, she concluded, the
"fraternity"' of folk singers is
deeper by' nature.
The same type of contrast cane
be seen, Odetta continued, when
comparing The Gate of Horn, folk
music night club in Chicago, with
any other club featuring a folk
singer on its bill.
Discusses Night Clubs
"The regular night club might
have a folk singer, a chanteuse,
a small combo and a comedian.
Some of the audience would have
come to see each one. They'd talk
while the others were on.
"In a regular night club," she
said, "a folk singer has to change
his delivery from night to night
to fit audience mood."
At The Gate of Horn, the only
all-folk music club in the country,
members of the audience may have
come to hear one or another of the
performers, Odetta admitted, but
the atmosphere is much closer to
the attentiveness of the concert
stage.
Enjoys'Student Audiences
Student audiences, 'the blues
singer said, are enjoyed by per-
formers because they are so alive.
'If they like you," she continued,
"it stimulates, you.")
Ocdetta singled out two college
concerts that stand out in her
mind. One was at Princeton, the
other here at the University during
last summer's National Student
Association meeting. During each,
she said, there was such an ovation
she had to "fight back the tears."
While in Ann Arbor this past

SODETTA
visiting folksinger
won. When I visited Yale they
won. When I visited Cleveland, I
didn't even have to watch the
game for them to win.
"I'm becoming a powerful force,"
she said- before the game yester-
day.
Wants to Travel
For the future, Odetta outlined
plans for obtaining a scholarship
to do folk song research abroad.
"I'd like to go to various coun-
tries and stay long enough to learn
the language," she explained. "I'd
collect songs and put them in
digest form, lullabies of. each
country, for example.
"I'd give the collections to
boards of education to use with
grade-school children. A lot of
fear is due to unfamiliarity."
"Soap-box" activity of this sort,
Odetta said, won't come for "a
little while yet, though." She flew
to Chicago after the football game
for a concert.

v a.YGALA HATS
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EACH ONE A BEAUTY!

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Little VELVET and FEATHER HEAD BANDS

and HALF HATS*. . . from 4.00

Ear Warming
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Warm Wool Jerseys
with nylon lisle lining
in Grey, Red and Black

C' -

This Is Ann

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at 2,00

Delightful
Little Half Hats

the

Looking like she's coming down
an Alpine slope in her Tyrolean
jacket. Anyone for yodeling?
Actually, Ann's walking in the "Ar
in her snug imported Loden coat
with knit trim on the collar.
Lined in fleece, accompanied by
its own beret, it's made to keep .
you warm as toast in the
Alps, in the "Arb", or just on
State Street or South U.

0

I

I

WOOL SCARVES
in authentic plaids
High shades and pastels
Wool and Raccoon
Fur Gloves"
Leather palms 3.50
Wool Mitts 2.00

chanel

Beige or Charcoal ... .'

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Charge it now
Pay in January at

look

,I

ON. FOREST
off South U.
opposite
Campus
Theatre

by

CAMPUS
TOGS
1111 South U.
1 % Blocks
from Main Shop

FOR TOWN AND COLEGE
302 South St tO Street

I

JERRY CILDEN'S
"SPECIAL EDITION"
Dress of the Month
Advertised in November .
Harper's Bazaar

I
1fy7J

\f 4j5J
j.-
r . k~p

For the Sake of Glamour

rs .

$1

Wikel-Schurz Drugs is opening the
LARGEST

f

SIT-DOWN COSMETIC COUNTER

I

Red roses richly pofferned on a black printed silk - by
Stafford Printers. Also in tones of blue, green roses.
Sizes 8 to 18.

V/ I1!

For the holidays,

. slim

in Ann Arbor-

Onondaga rayon crepe

sheath with fluid, flat-

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.i# nr rrn nr +ka ] C, cirti* r cin Amblft;-+^C0AM rnr% t /r ILAIII M ftnl a ktrir r-n rnetfirc

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