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November 24, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I'm MCHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY,1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY,:

n

-Daiy-wesley Kar
E ACTOR-Emlyn Williams, who performed Friday night at
iditorium, prepares for the program which was based on
of Dylan Thomas. Williams had spent a year readying the
a] for the production.
Iy
hams Recals Beginning
Thomas, Interpretations

Africa Talk,
To Be Given
By S lawson
Prof. Chester B. Slawson of the
mineralogy department will speak
and show colored slides on the
"Development of Resources and
People (of Africa)" at 7:30 p.m.
today in Aud. A of Angell Hall.
. Prof. Slawson's talk is the third
in a series of informal travel talks
entitled "Report: Arica" being
sponsored by the International
Center.
Takes Many Slides
Prof. Slawson has taken four
trips toAfrica in recent years and
has taken "well over a thousand
slides" in the course of his trav-
els. He will use some of the col-
ored slides in his collection to 11-
lustrate his talk.
"Actually," he commented, "I
could no more cover the people
and resources of Africa in an hour,
than someone could list all the in-
formation about \the people and
resources of America in an hour."
He added that he will concen-
trate on the diamond mining
areas south of the Sahara Desert.
To Dispell Illusions
"Ir hope I can dispell some of
the popular illusions about Africa
in my talk," Prof. Slawso con-
tinued.
"We traveled about 1200 miles
on one trip and every night we
stayed at a good hotel."
Prof. Slawson said he traveled
all through many cities in Africa
unescorted and never had any1
trouble.
"Africa is actually a good deal
safer than many parts of Detroit,",
he remarked.
Six Appointed
To Committee
By University
The University 'Board of Re-
gents approved six committee ap-
pointments yesterday.
Prof. George E. Hay, acting
chairman of the mathematics de-
partment, Prof. Wallace W. Gard-
ner, of the mathematics depart-
ment, and Prof. Stuart W. Chur-
chill, of the engineering school,
were appointed to the Executive
Committee of the Statistical Re-
search Laboratory.
Prof. Lawrence O. Brockway, of
the chemistry department, was
appointed to the Board of Govern-
ors of Religious Affairs. He re-
places Prof. Carlton F. Wells of
the English department, who re-
signed from the board.
Acting Dean Stephen S. Att-
wood of the College of Engineer-
ing was appointed to the Execu-
tive Committee of the~ Summer
Session. He succeeds the late Dean
George Granger Brown of the en-
gineering college.
Prof. Howard M. Ehrmann,
chairman of the history depart-
ment,-was named to the Exeu-
tive Commitee of the Michigan
Historical Collections.

AT HILL AUDITORIUM:
Warfield To Present Concert Tuesday

NOW

William Warfield, baritone sing-
er, will present the fifth Choral
Union Concert at 8:30 p.m. Tues-
day in Hill Auditorium.
Included in the program will be
"Thanks Be To Thee" by Handel,
"Good Fellows Be Merry" by Bach,
"Bois Epais" by Lully and "In-
felice e Tuo Credevi" by Verdi.
Warfield will also sing selec-
tions written by Loewe and Schu-
bert and music arranged by Cop-
land, Johnson and Burleigh.
A native of Arkansas, Warfield
moved to New York at a young
age and began his singing with a
Add Three'
o Facult
Three faculty appointments to
the literary college were approved
yesterday by the Regents.
A faculty member of Hunter Col-
lege in New York, Prof. Harry L.
Levy, was appointed visiting pro-
fessor of classical studies for the
second semester of the 1957-58
year.
Director of University Relations
Lyle M. Nelson was appointed pro-
fessor of journalism. He is expected
to serve as an occksional lecturer
in journalism courses.
Filling the position of assistant
professor of economics, half-time,
was Prof. Eva. L. Mueller, who
presently is with the Survey Re-
search Center.

church choir. As he grew older he
decided not to sing and devoted
his time to the study of piano.
Later, however, he again began
singing.
While in high school Warfield
won first prize in the music con-

In 1950 he made his Town Hall
debut as a concert singer in New
York which resulted in his being
.asked to go on several tours. His
first tour was athree month con-
cert trip through Australia.;
In 1952 Warfield starred in his
well-known role of Porgy in the
show "Porgy and Bess."
Since then Warfield has made
concert tours in several countries
and has done several recordings
for Columbia Records.

STANDING OFF A LYNCH MOB...
for $40 a month and a shinyTin Star!

I

musket

KISS

I

ME

I

KATE

~~~ o ilNO 2-2513

iN A PERLSERG.SEATON PRODUCTION.-
BETSY PALMER - MICHEL RAY
NEVILLE BRAND . JOHN McINTIRE
Produced by William Perlbergand George Seaton
Directed by Anthony Mann.Screenplay by Dudley Nichoha
From a Story by BarneySlater andJoel Kane
A Paramount Relca
also CARTOON and SPECIALTY

WILLIAM WARFIELD
.. baritone

test sponsored by the National
Music Educators League which
gave him a scholarship to any
music conservatory of his choice.
He chose Eastman School of Music
in Rochester, N. Y. because of its
reputation.

I

.."""""""""""""""""""------"*1Utm« uR~ mtmiSt

t

By DIANE FRASER
Removing his grey tweed over-
coat and donning a fresh light
blue: shirt, Emlyn Williams sat
down before the mirror in his
Fights Mark
nd of 1957
Football Year
(Continued from Page 1)
then turned, as if it had come
from the deep South, to attack a
green-capped Negro who had talk-
ed too much.
The fight moved Into one corner
of the stadium, a few fist-con-
scious individuals tried swinging
portable chairs at one another and
uniformed police officers made
their first appearance outside the
warm pressbox, almost half an
hour after the game had ended.
While liquor bottles broke in
the stands and firecrackers ex-
ploded on the field, members of
the crowd ran to the other end of
the field to threaten the goal
posts there.
Belligerent Escapes
Uniformed and plainclothes of-
ficers tried to drag one belligerent
off the field and through the mob
of people, but the green cap duck-
ed twice and broke away from the
crowd to escape.
More fistfights broke out, more
!irecrackers exploded and beer
canis were hurled from the stanids
by watching boys. The few police-
men disappeared and the crowds
broke into smaller groups, running
from one end of the stadium to
the other.
Finally, tie last drunken specta-
tors paused at the side of the gray,
overcast field with their wives and
gave a last cheer for the alma
mater.
Goalposts Remain
The goalposts still stood, un-
damaged. Most of the seats in the
stadium remained, too, but a few
had been hacked up and were
taken out with their one-time oc-
cupants.
But the cold wind still remain-
ed, stirring the hay pile in front
of the OSTJ bench, bouncing the
apple cores in the' band section,
whipping up the newspapers and
refuse in the stands, bouncing the
still unbroken whisky bottles and
beer cans on the cement steps, and
bringing the 1957 Michigan foot-
ball season to a chilly but bitter
end.

dressing room in Hill Auditorium4
and began to brush his silver grey
hair.
"If you don't mind I'll put on
my makeup 'fpr the performance,"
he said in his distinguished British
accent.!
"Although I never met Dylan
Thomas personally, I feel that I
know him much better through his
work," he commented.'"Through
this medium, I have a clearer pic-
ture of him."
Rcfalls Opening
Picking up a picture of Thomas
presented to him by Thomas'
mother, the Welsh actor recalled
the beginning of his interpreta-
tion of the late poetTaone-night,
memorial performance for Thom-
as' family in the Globe Theatre in
London.
"Edith Evans and Richardi read
his poetry and I did stories by him.
This was the beginning of 'A Boy
Growing Up,"' he said.
Williams decided that he should
weave together a theatrical enter-
tainment on Thomas., He went
through all of Thomas' works and
put them together as a review.
Not Impersonation,
Williams does not attempt to
impersonate Thomas-"as you can
see' by the makeup I'm using." He
illustrated by comparing himself
with Thomas' picture. "Thomas
.speaksthrough me; I am his
mouthpiece."
Williams recalled that he was
very nervous when he first ap-
peared in "A Boy Growing Up,"
more nervous than the opening
night of his other one-man. enter-
tainmnent on Dickens.
"People had seen Thomas where,
no one had seen Dickens," he ex-
plained.
Developed from Dickens
The interpretation of Thonas
was a creation by Williams as an
offshoot of his Dickens produc-
tion1, which was given in Ann
Arbor four and one-half years
ago.
The Dickens show began sev-
eral years ago when he imperson-
ated Dickens in a charity perform-
ance. "I sat down and decided to
make an evening of Dickens which
proved successful."
Entertainment Program
Peering into the large mirror,
Williams applied his eye makeup.
"People want to call this enter-
tainment from the stories of
Thomas' a reading, but it isn't.
After taking a year to get ready,
it certainly isn't a reading!"
A mnock on the door reminded
the Welsh actor that time was
short before his appearance be-
fore the expectant audience in Hill
Auditorium.

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