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October 30, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IAN DAILY WEDNZSD;
ALGERIA CAUSES CRISIS:
French Assembly Rejects New C

nference
de assistance to students
uancial difficulties and to
n twenty out-of-state

scholarships. '
,pital Gifts Program has
2,000 from various sour-
siness, industry, founds-
(individuals in 1956. Its
have included the pro-
research sponsorships,
s and scholarships,
t for student housing and
;udent programs.
bjectives of the program
uded aid to the under-
library, research assist-
faculty research fellow-
library and museum ac-
nt Relations Program
ther improve the stu-
derstanding of the De-
t Council's activities a
Relations Program was
This representative body
.ts uses many media of
:ation to inform the stu-
i particularly graduating
f the 'function and needs
evelopment Council and

-'

DISCUSS SEASOI
Norton talk over t
the 1957-58 speed
Drama
For Sp

-Dally-James MacKay
N-Prof. Halstead (left), Prof. Bender and Prof.
heir plans for directing the five productions in
h department playbill.
fSeason Begins
ech Department '

This, week end the Council will
review its past accomplishments
and plan for the future. An im-
portant new facet of the Council's
program will be the more inten-
sive cultivation of the major
sources of philanthropy; founda-
tions, corporations, and individ-
uals.'
Group Plans
School Survey
The. Literary College Steering
Committee will sample faculty
opinion this week on the best
place to institute a junior .year
abroad plan for the University.
After discussing various possi-
bilities at their meeting Monday,
the group decided' to poll the
various departments to find the
best of the foreign educational in-
stitutions. Most of the college de-
-partment chairmen and members
of the faculty who' have been
abroad Till be asked which uni-
versities are strong in their field.
When this information is com-
piled next week, the committee
will attempt to choose a country
and perhaps narrow the field of
schools eligible for consideration
for the proposed junior year of
study sponsored by the University.

By DIANE FRASER '
Kesselring, O'Neill, Verdi, Synge,'
Shakespeare . . . together these
'authors spell a playbill of literary,
greats for the 1957-58 speech de-
partment season.
A successful season depends not'
only on the plays themselves butl
u pon the directors who are respon-'
s ble for the production.
Prof. William P. Halstead, Prof.
Jack E. Bender and Prof. Hugh Z.
Norton, all of the speech depart-
ment, are the "men behind thel
stage" responsible for the directing
of the five productions.
Season Opens Nov. 7 j
The season opens on Nov. 7,withl
the farce, "Arsenic and Old Lace,"
by Joseph Kesselring, directed by
Prof. Bender. "Showing that mur-
der can be funny is its outstanding
point," director Bender com-
mented.
If, this play were treated seri-
ously it would be immoral, he
continued. "An absurd situation
and play bear no resemblance to,
reality and thus the subject of
murder can be treated so lightly."
The idea of two old ladies trying
to help lonely old men by offering;
them a glass of wine with arsenic
to give them peace is far~ from
reality, Prof. Bender explained. A
nephew who thinks he is Teddy
Roosevelt buries their 13 victims
in the "Panama Canal" he has dug
in the basement.
Easily Done by a High School
One of the reasons for the selec-
tion of this play is that it can be
easily done by a high schoooi
Prof. Bender will also direct
"Playboy of the Western. World"
by J. M. Synge, which opens March
20. He refers to this plays as "one
of the great classics."
Most of Prof. Bender's work
has been done in the educational
theatre. However, he has had, ex-
perience as a designer in the the-
atre.
Audience To See Skeleton
As the curtain opens on Eugene
O'Neill's "Desire Under the Elms,"
Dec. -5, the audience will see the
skeleton of an entire house sketch-
ed against the sky. "O'Neill calls
for an entire house so we will use
several rooms including an up-
stairs," Prof. Norton, the director,
said.
"We believe that the modified
constructivistic setting does not
emphasize the concrete realism of
the story so much as its fundamen-
tal meaning and the poetry there
is in it," the director continued,
"This gets away from simple mor-
bid realism."
Prof. Bender, with Prof. Josef

Blatt of the music school, will also
direct the opera "Masked Ball,"
by Verdi, opening Feb. 26. The
opera will be done in English and
the setting will be 18th Century
Sweden.
Plot in Boston
"Because of the intrigue sur-
rounding the ssassination of the
king, the plot of the opera couldn't
originally be set in, Sweden or any-
where in Europe. Therefore, Verdi
laid it in Boston," the director ex-
plained. "We are anxious to put
it back in Sweden where the story
makes sense, -.
Prof. Bender had several years;
experience in professional acting
before he came to the University in
1941. Besides acting in New York,
on the road- and in summer stock,
he has had experience in radio and
recording.
Semi-transparent costumes and
scenery--an unusual .touch to the
light comedy "Love's Labor's Lost,"
by William Shakespeare, opens on
April 24. "This will warn the audi-
ence not to get too involved in the
plot," the director, Prof. Halstead,
commented.
Suggests Lightness,
"Because it is such a lightweight"
play, we want to suggest this light-
ness that you can see throughout
the play, by the costumes," he said.
"This interest should lie in the dia-
logue and the characterization."
Prof. Halstead's experience has
beenin the educational theatre. He
has been at the University for 24
years.
Law School
Alters Policy.
University Law School has dis-
continued its program of admit-
ting freshmen in February, ac-
cording to Assistant Dean Roy F.
Proffitt.
This practice was started to ac-
comnmodate Korean War veterans
discharged from service at odd
times of the year. However, a
freshman class will be enrolled in
the Law School this June as in
the past..
According to Prof. Richafd> V.
Wellman, returns from' Ohio and
California show that University
Law School graduates have the
best record of any school in pass-
ing state bar examinations.
In June, 23 out of 25 'U' gradu-
ates passed the Ohio bar exams
while 13 out of 14 succeeded in
California.

By DAVID TARR
The unpredictable French have
once again pulled a surprise.
Pushing on into the third sweek
of its most' recent government
Cabinet crisis-the twenty-second
since World War. II - France
seemed ready this week to install
Guy Mollet as Premier. After
President Rene Coty had asked
three candidates - one of them
Mollet-to form a new government,
to replace the one that fell Sept.
30 on a limited home-rule bill for
Algeria, it was expected the Na-
tional Assembly would be ready to
okay a new premier.
Monday' the Assembly defeated
Mollet's second attempt proving it'
was not. A surprising element in
the defeat is that Mollet is one
of the few men in France that has
had any success at heading a long-
term government.
Held Office for 16 Months
The last one he headed, which
fell in May, held office for sixteen
months.(The average government
has a life of only six months inj
France.) But this, lengthy tenure
indicates as much an accommoda-
tion between different political
parties as strong and effective
leadership from Mollet.
As Prof. Roy Pierce of the poli-
tical science department put it
Monday, "The length of time a
Premier stays in office is not a sure
measure of what he accomplishes;
the least forceful and most concil-
iatory man may enjoy the longest
tenure.",
The problem in France is some-'
thing like this:
No Party Has Majority,
No one party in the 595-seat
National Assembly has enough
seats to command a majority. This
makes it necessary for several par-
ties to join in a coalition to form
a government. Since the french
parties usually have widely varying
opinions, a premier supported by a
coalition is frequently helpless.
Still ahother problem is the 200
deputies in the Assembly (Com-
munists on the left and Poujadists
on the right) that have no use for
the system at all.
This leaves the other parties,,the
"national" groups, to form a gov-
ernment. The poles of this group
are the Socialists and the right-
wing Independents with about 100
seats each.'
A Cabinet crisis, where the Pre-
mier loses the support of one group
in the coalition, is one way the As-
sembly has of locating an alterna-
tive policy to the one the present
government proposes. The consid-
eration of Mollet, since he said
he, would push the same Alegrian
proposal on which the last govern-
ment fell in September,' indicates

the Assembly cannot find an alter-
native this time. But his defeat
Monday indicates. they are not
ready to stop looking.
Leaders More Concerned
However, reports from France
indicate political leaders are more
concerned over this crisis than
any of the others singe World War,
II. It is believed virtually all other
possibilities for a Premier accept-
able to the Assembly have been
exhausted.
This greatly concerns the coun-
try's responsible leaders who real-
ize France, being short of francs
with which to pay its internal bills,
of gold and dollars 'for its inter-
national ones, with waves of
strikes, with the Algerian rebellion
entering its fourth year, urgently
needed strong leadership.
But Prof. Pierce warned against
overestimating the seriousness of
the crisis in France.
Ie said it is questionable
whether France's problems today
are any more serious than those it
faced in another period of crisis,
1947-51.
Economy Booming
"In some ways the country look-
ed closer to internal collapse dur-
ing that period than it does now.
Presently the economy is booming
and industry growing; economi-
cally t4e'y certainly are in better
shape than during 1947-51." But
he noted that a serious inflationary
problem now faces the country.
The future of the French system
is as big a question mark as it ever
was. But there are no clear indi-
cations that it is any bigger now
than before.
Prof. Pierce indicated the sys-
tem will continue to move along in
its fashion going from crisis to
crisis. but managing to survive.
PERSONAL
CHRISTMAS
CARDS
Our excellent Sample
Books' of personalized
cards are now on display.
We suggest th~at you
make your selection
NOW!
OVERBECK
BOOKSTORE
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The

I

To have a system that would
operate more efficiently and have
more stable and lasting govern-
ments would require major reforms
in France. Prof. Pierce said the
likelihood of Constitutional reform
is probably exaggerated. "However,
marginal possibilities" of this sort
of action exist, he indicated.
Prof. Pierce said a power to
dissolve might not strengthen the
government as much as is some-
times thought. He added that if
the executive were given more
power the Assembly might be
tempted to pick a weaker man to
fill that post.
Electoral System Reform Possible
Reform off the electoral system,
one of the most complicated in
existence, is possible., But it is
unlikely any, reforms would have
much effect on strengthening goy-

Si'

ernments
terms of c
possibiliti

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