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October 27, 1957 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-27

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IN- MICHIGAN DAILY

.PAGE

TIlE IWICWIGAN DAILY PAtJ!

i pAU . AAL...

. Turkey Separates Russia from Oil-Rich Middle East-

By TOM HENSHAW
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
'.urkey, staunch ally of the
United States and traditional
enemy of all that is Russian, is
emerging once again as a key to
the frantic Middle East.
The rugged republic of the Turks
lies across the top of the Arab
world, a physical barrier to over-
land contact Metween the USSR
and its recently acquired Middle
East foothold in Syria.
And the Turks also control the
Turkish Straits, one of the world's
three most important waterways
(the Panama and Suez canals are
the others) which could bar Rus-
sia's fleet from the open sea.
The Turks are something of an
anomaly.
Far from European
Part of their land lies in Europe,
yet they are far from being Euro-
pean. Their European neighbors
in the Balkan states view them
with longtime, deep-seated dis-
trust.
The Turks are 98 per cent Mos-
lem by religion and their land juts
I into the Arab world, yet they are
not Arabs and relations with their
* fellow Moslem states are cool.
Turkey is the 296,000 square mile
remnant of the Ottoman Empire,
once one of the world's largest.
And that's important in under-
standing the world position of
modern Turkey.
Covers Mid-East
At its height, Ottoman rule ex-
tended from Algeria in North
Africa to the tip of the Arabian
Peninsula; from deep in Persia to
the gates of Vienna in Europe;
from southern Russia to the
Sudan.
It was founded by non-Arab in-
vaders from Central Asia in the
14th Century, reached its peak in
the 16th Century under the Sultan
Suleiman the Magnificent and died
less than 40 years ago, a casualty
of World War I.
At least two of modern Turkey's
international relationships are
rooted in Ottoman times. The sul-
tans fought the Russians 27 times
in' 300 years. And they' ruled the
subject Balkan and Arab worlds

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Jury To Hear
UAW Election
Violation Trial
DETROIT (W) - Trial of the
United Auto Workers Union,
charged with violating the Federal
Corrupt Prictices Act in 1954 elec-
tion campaigns, is scheduled to
begin Tuesday in United States
District Court before Judge Frank
A. Picard. A jury will hear the case.
The UAW was indicted July 26,
1955, charged with spending $5,985
from its general funds to sponsor
a series of political television pro-
grams the previous fall.
The Corrupt Practices Act for-
bids Banks, Corporations and La-
bor organizations from making
political expenditures in connec-
tion with Federal elections.
In February 1956 Judge Picard
dismissed the indictment, holding
with union attorneys that the pro-
hibition violated freedom of
speech.
The United States Supreme
Court, by a 6-3 majority, last
March sent the case back to Picard
with orders to determine the facts
via trial. The justices did not rule
on the constitutional question.
If the union were found guilty
it could be fined up to $5,000 on
each of four counts.
Questions raised by Justice
Frankfurter, who wrote the Su-
premeCourt's majority opinion,
included: "Did it (the telecasts)
constitute active electioneering, or
simply state the record of particu-
lar candidates on economic issues?
Did the union sponsor the broad-
casts with the intent to affect the
results of the election?"
The Union is specifically charged
with paying for the radio and tele-
vision broadcasts of Guy Nunn
with UAW general funds.
The government contends the
Union departed from the declared
educational purpose of the broad-
casts.

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:., Dara'anelles .Kii s=;_;
TQY r. W.. ..v : AP Newsfeatur

with heavy, sometimes cruel,
hands.
Dardanelles Important
The continuous estrangement
with Russia centers about the
straits-the Dardanelles, 37 miles'
long, one to four miles wide; and.
the Bosporus, 17 miles long, one-
half to one and one-half miles'
wide.
Under the Montreaux Conven-
tion, signed in 1936 by Britain,
France, the USSR, Turkey, Japan,
Bulgaria, Romania, Greece, Yugo-
slavia and, later, Italy, the Turks
govern and guard the straits.
The convention also sets up rules
of passage-and allows Turkey to
close the straits if it feels it is
being threatened by an aggressor.
Disturbs Russia
Russia, with a large Black Sea
fleet based at Odessa and Sevas-
topol and no other outlet to the
open ocean, isunderstandably con-
cerned.
Turkey shares 367 miles of bor-
der with Russia in the eastern
province of Kurdistan, home of a
million and a half. nomadic Kurd
tribesmen. The Kurds have never
been fully assimilated by the Turks
and the Russians have been direct-
ing a heavy propaganda barrage at
them.
Some 75 miles off the southern
coast of Turkey lies the troubled
island of Cyprus, 80 per cent
Greek, 20 per cent Turkish. The

Turkish Cypriots, who oppose
union of the island with Greece,
have been a stumbling block to
settlement of the British-Greek
dispute.
Hard-Boiled View
The Turks, viewing their un-
friendly surroundings like the
hard-boiled realists they are, pos-
sess what is undoubtedly the
strongest military force in the
Middle East.
Compulsory military service be-
gins at 20. The term is two years,
three in an emergency. The stand-
ing army numbers roughly 370,000
officers and men. An estimated
two million could be mobilized in
case. of war.
Civic Theatre
Meets Tonight
The Ann Arbor Civic' Theatre
will hold a general meeting at 7:30
p.m. tonight in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre in the League.
Prof. Anthony Pasquariello of
the Spanish department will dis-
cuss "The Spanish Theatre-Pub-
lic Plays and Players."
Parts open for the Theatre's
production of "Guys and Dolls" in
January will be described during
a short business meeting.'

Pro-Western Turkey is the east-
ernmost anchor of the North At-
lantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
and also is a member-with Bri-
tain, Iraq, Iran and Pakistan-of
the Middle East Treaty Organiza-
tion (METO), better known as the
Baghdad Pact.
But, while militarily strong,
Turkey is economically weak. The
weakness can be traced to these
factors:
1. It supports the largest stand-
ing army in NATO and is forced to
spend a quarter of its national
budget on defense. It does this
despite American aid estimated at
a billion dollars in the past decade.
2. In the midst of an export-
import imbalance, Turkey has been
forging ahead with an ambitious
program of industrial development
and modernization that has drain-
ed its foreign credits.
Push Development
The development program has
been pushed forward at a desper-
ate pace by Adnan Menderes, pre-
mier since 1950, whose ruling
Democratic party (474 of 541
Grand National Assembly seats)
faces a general election Oct. 27.
The balloting was expected to
take place next May but was
moved up seven months to the
earliest possible date. Menderes'
opposition-the People's Republi-
can, Freedom and National parties
-say the shift was made because
the Democrats fear their economic
policies are costing them popu-
larity at an alarming rate.

Bartlett Says
Soviet Ahead
In Education'
DETROIT (A)-Lynni M. Bartlett,
State Superintendent of Public In-
struction, told a teachers institute
today that "if we want science
teachers brilliant enough to train
top-notch scientists, we cannot ex-
pect them to be stupid enough to
work for small salaries."
Bartlett said Russian college
professors get the equivalent of
$20,000 a year and that Russian
students are paid to attend a uni-
versity, the higher their grades the
higher the pay.
"I do not advocate that we in
the United States adopt the Soviet
system of education," Bartlett told
the institute sponsored by the
Michigan Education Association.
"I simply want to point out that
while we have talked, planned and
projected," he continued, "Russia
has built, enforced and effected.
"We can no longer say that
though it may be true they are
training more scientists than we
train, these scientists are not of
the same caliber as ours."
The Rev. Carl S. Winters, how-
ever, took a different tack on Rus-
sian education, saying its quality
was far intferior to that of the
United States.
"Our education is so superior in
breadth to Russia's crash pro-
gram," the minister said, "That
there is no comparison."
Once chairman of the Michigan
State Crime Commission, Dr. Win-
ters now is pastor of the First
Baptist Church in Oak Park.
When you say
LAUNDRY
SHIRTS
and
Dry Cleaning
Hundreds of
Happy Students
think
First of
PACKARD
Quick Service
LAUNDRY
715 Packard (Near State)
NO 2-4241
Open Evenings
Ample Parking

A Group of Wool
Suits, Tweeds,
Flannels, Knits,
Rayon and Acetate
Blends

Group of DRESSES of ev-
ery kind including eve-
ning and cocktail dresses.

A group of beautiful wool
tweed suits. Sizes 7-15,
10-20 Reg. and Petite.
Originally 49.95 to 59.95.
Special 39.95,

Sizes 7-15, 10-44,
241/2, tall 10-20.
nally to 29.95.
14.98

121-
Origi-

2500
orig.
to 49.95

, MONTH-EN D
CLEARANCE of
fall suits and dresses

Costume suits' (wool
dresses with jack-
ets and better
dresses of all kinds
including cocktail-
Bridesmaids and in-
formal wedding
dresses.

I

Group of Hats, costume
Jewelry, Zircon stone set
rings,, Dinner Rings, Long
Cinch Bras, Blouses, -
Sweaters.

WILKINSON
for the first
time ever!
Samsonite
Train
Case
S a1e!

Or -anization
Notices
Lutheran Student Assn., Internation-
al supper and program, Oct. 27, 6:00
p.m., Lutheran Student Center.
+ " s
Pi Lambda Theta, dessert meeting,
Oct. 28, 7:15 p.m., Rackham. Special
guests: International Teachers of Eng-
lish. Speaker: Dr. Helen Dodson Prince,
"Our Neighbor the Sun."
* * *
Hillel, Interfaith Committee meeting
and special report, Oct. 28, 7:15 p.m.,
Hiilel.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group, meeting,
Oct. 27, 7:00 p.m., First Unitarian
Church. ' Speaker: Mr. M c Q u i n n,
"Fromm's Psychoanalytic Ideas."
Graduate Outing Club, hiking, Oct.
27, 1:30 p.m., meet in back of Rackham.
* - -
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Students
Group, weekly Sunday supper and pro-
gram, Oct. 27, 6:00 p.m., University
Lutheran Chapel. Missionary Elmer
Bergt will speak on his experiences as
a Lutheran missionary in Japan.
pE'"Eni'"* *"' ** '
Newman Club, supper, Oct. 27, 6:00
p.m., Newman.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, lec-
ture, Oct. 27, 4:00 p.m., Lane Hall.
Speaker; Dr. Merril Tenney, Dean,
Grad. School, Wheaton College' "Why
Are We Here?"
* s a
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
Hymn Festival and discussion about
Our Reform, Oct. 27, 6:50 p.m., 524
Thompson.

5,00

Group of Strapless Bras,
girdles, rhinestone rings,
necklaces, nylon blouses.
3.98

DRESSES of every kind
and size. Better hats of
Beaver, Meluvine, velour,
velvet.
10.0
Group of Jackets
Jumpers -- Skirts
NYLON HOSE-all good
shades. Broken Sizes 81/2
short to 107 long. Were
originally 1.35 to 1.65.
Group of Rhinestone
necklaces and earrings.
Many pieces were origi-
nally 5.95.
NOW 1.00

CAMPUS
TOGS \
1111 S. U.

ON FOREST
off corner S.U.
opposite
Campus
Theatre

P!

I1

Notice
to House Managers
Fraternities and Sororities
We specialize in
NEW FURNITURE:
Rugged Built - U.S. Naugahyde Covered
or Fabric if you choose
* RE-UPHOLSTERING:
warranfed to be the BEST: U. S. Naugahyde
and hundreds of fabrics of choose from.
* FOAM RUBBER:
We Re-Build or Exchange the Construction
in Leather or fabric Cushions to Solid foam.

U

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t r J
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;,;M'i."~!a'J:.11 .''.IYS'.+5OM

{: . - ., i

1

s s s

MORRILL'S
314 State Street
NO 3-2482

Hillel, mass meeting for Hillel Play-
ers, Oct. 27, 4:30 p.m., Hillel.
* ** $
Regional International Student Re-
lations Seminar, Nov. 8-10, Union.
Those wishing to be representatives of
the U of M at the seminar may obtain
applications in the Student Govern-
ment Council area of the SAB. Appli-
cations are due no later than Tues.,
Oct. 29.

f:;
;";n,
:}}
?:Z
cif
;it:
>:'
ti'

Collins

Shop.

STATE
and
LIBERTY

LET US ADVISE YOU

Streamlite Train
Case... regularly $17.50
.Sale
PWS TAX
Pre-Christmas speciall
Streamlite Train Case
holds 52 travel needs-
out-travels all others!
Comes in Hawaiian Blue
Rawhide Finish, Saddle
Tan, Admiral Blue&
Bermuda Green,
London Grey,
Colorado Browz6
Wilkinson*
LUGGAGE SHOP
Onen Mondays 'Ti8 :.20

RENDEL'S UPHOLSTERING
Quality work over 25 years
Phone NO 2-4706 Ann Arbor

U

I

I

DON'T BE LATE
for
EUROPE '5
book now at
TRAVEL BUREAU INC.
1313 S. University
LOW COST TOURS
40 days in Europe from $250

DACRON-NYLON TRICOT
in three lengths
four colors
A

.tL

E
I

I

s greater opacity
" less static
This is the slip that washes
and wears like a miracIe because
it's deftly fashioned in
the magical wonder fabric...
Dacron-Nylon Tricot. The
lace-frosted bodice "peeks"
prettily through sheerest
blouses yet daintily, opaquely
covers your bra. White,
$895

< .
,
;
:
: :

-
I..:

gay jumpers ..
see our collection soon!
YES, every gal on campus soon discovers that a
charming wool jumper is essential to her ward-
robe for wear on casual or dressier occasions.
See our attractive tweeds or solid color jumpers
in your favorite styles ... junior or regular
sizes.

Aw 0 -'

I

fashion portrays the.

co-ed in

1298

to 1g98

WE HAVE many attractive cotton shirts, wool
, : )jersev blouses or sweaters to mix 'n match with

I

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