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October 27, 1957 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-27

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I

THE MICMIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1957

STERN MICHIGAN HOMECOMING:
Students Brave Snow, Wind

By BART HUTHWAITE -
_rey skies and freezing tem-
atures yesterday -failed to dim
stern Michigan College's home-
ning enthusiasm.
3raving snow flurries and chil-
winds, over 5,000 people lined
silanti streets to view the color-
homecoming parade. Floats,
istructed by student organiza-
ns, passed in review.
>ne fraternity float, powered
a tractor, depicted a giant bug
vouring a Southern Illinois Uni-
sity football player. Another
empted to show the perils of
outdoor privy.
Outhouse Trouble
1 tobacco chewing farmer was
ring trouble closing the ram-
Lckle outhouse door. His moon-.
ne drinking friend leaned
Linst a nearby rock and gave
pful advice.
!rm of Honor, a local frater-
y, took top prize in the frater-
y class with their south sea
ind float. A shivering native,

--Daily-James MacKay
WINNING FLOAT-"Showboat" took top honors in the women's
dormitory division of the Eastern Michigan College parade yes-
terday. The float was built by students from Downing Hall.

Nancy Katchmark, rested on a
palm tree-dotted beach.
, Women's dormitory. h o n o r s
went to Downing Hall for their
float entitled "Showboat." A
white - gloved minstrel singer
smiled at the cheering students
and alumni.
Judge Floats
Floats were judged on the ba-
sis of beauty, humor, originality,
theme and workmanship. Students
worked far into the night, Friday,
to put the finishing touches on
their entries.
The parade's climax came with
the appearance of the Homecom-
ing Queen's float. Flanked by her
four member court, Gail Ponte
waved to the approving crowd.
Gail, a second semester sopho-
more majorin gin physical educa-
tion, was voted the honor by the
college's male population. Her
court included Shirley Sampier,
Sara Symington, Barbara Young-
erman and Marge Zizzi.
Win Game
An undefeated football team
clashed with the Salukis of South-
ern Illinois University during the
afternoon and won. It was the
30th annual homecoming game
for the Hurons of Eastern Michi-
gan.
The Hurons were considered a
slight favorite before the crucial

conference game. An estimated
crowd of 4,000 cheering fans wit-
nessed the annual event.
Sparked by high scoring quar-
terback Bill Ameel, the Hurons
romped over the tough Southern
Illinois team. At the sound of the
final buzzer, the scoreboard read
21-7 in favor of Eastern Michigan
College.
Fourth Win
It was the fourth win for the
conference-leading team.
Half-time was highlighted by,
the introduction of the homecom-
ing queen. White-helmeted ROTC
cadets escorted the campus beau-
ty-to her place of honor before the
crowd. The queen's salute was
fired by the precision ROTC team.
Shivering slightly, Gail Ponte
thanked the students for the high
honor they had bestowed upon
her. Then she retreated to the
warmth of a coat and the stands.
A homecoming dance in Mc-
Kenny hall climaxed the week-
end acair. Homecoming queen
Gail Ponte was again introduced
to the student body.
Other homecoming festivities in-
clude a snake dance to the col-
lege fleldhouse. Led by cheerlead-
ers and the schools marching band,
students gathered for a pre-game
pep rally.

Tuesday Set
For Concert
ByMenuhin
Yehudi Menuhin, violinist, will
be featured in the third concert of
the Choral Union Series at 8:30
p.m. Tuesday in Hill Auditorium.
Menuhin, accompanied by
Adolph Baller, will play "Sonata
in G, Opus 13" by Grieg, "Partita
in D Minor" by Bach, "Fantaisie
Opus 159" by Schubert, "Dryades
et Pan, from Mythes Opus 30" by
Szymanowski, and "I Palpiti" by
Paganini.
The American - born violinist
first appeared as soloist with the
San Francisco Symphony Orches-
tra at the age of eight years old
and was then regarded as a child
prodigy of the era.
Menuhin is known as the fore-
most interpreter of the violin
music of Bach however he has
launched many modern violin
compositions.
He made his first world tour in
1935, after which he retired from
professional life for two years.
In 1940 he resumed his career,
appearing with many famous or-
chestras. Since that time he has
appeared in every continent and
in many instances has been the
first American artist to play in a
country.
During this past year Menuhin
went behind the Iron Curtain for
the second time, playing in Poland
and Hungary.
Civil Defense
Tests Delayed
In Local Area
Proposed nation wide Civil De-
fense tests of Conelrad emergency
broadcasting facilities have been
postponed, the Federal Civil De-
fense Administration announced.
The test, originally, scheduled
for Nov. 4 has been divided into
eight regional exercises conform-
ing to the air defense divisions
throughout the UnitedsStates.
The area including Washtenaw
county will be tested Jan. 13, 1958.
All regular radio and television
stations in the vicinity will either
shut down for 30 minutes or
broadcast on the Conelrad fre-
quency of 640 or 1240 KC.

By ED MOORE
Associated Press Financial Writer
NEW YORK-The stock market
was all even by the end of this
week after one of the most hectic
five-day periods in histroy.
The Associated Press average of
60 stocks closed at $156.70, un-
changed from the week before.
But volume soared to 20,804,199
shares, the highest total since the
week ended Oct. 1, 1956. That was
the first week after President
Dwight D. Eisenhower's heart at-
tack.
Stocks Dive
The outstanding highlights of
the week were two days-Monday
and Wednesday.
On Monday, stocks took their
worst dive since Sept. 26, 1955-
the first trading session after the
heart attack of President Eisen-
hower.
On Wednesday, the market made
its biggest one-day advance since
Dec. 14, 1929.
Volume Rises
The latter was a day of tem-
porary recovery following the
blackest days of the depression
crash. This was a climatic week
in the long decline, now well into
its fourth month, since the market
reached its highest point on July
12, 1957.
The tremendous volume, the re-
peated series of late ticker tapes,
the almost frenzied scale of buying
on the heaviest days-these were
the factors that spelled climax in
the language of WallStreet.
It was a climax to a long decline
-but what next? A strong re-
covery? A continued decline slide
to new lows for the year?
Market Watched
The word among financial ana-
lysts these days is that the market
must "test" the lows reached this
week.
If it sinks through time, the
market is in for a continued de-
cline; if it rebounds, then the
prospects are good for a fairly sus-
tained recovery.
In this case, predictions call for
a recovery of one-third to two-
thirds of the ground lost since
July 12.
Trend Downward
After that, they say, the burden
of proof will be on the bulb~ as to
whether the market is to continue
its progress. They point out that
ever since the all-time bull market
high, reached in April 1956, the
general trend has been downward.
The highs have never surpassed
that April '56 high. The lows have
been increasingly lower.
There was no special news to
send the market plummeting on
Club To Hear
Prof. Ackley '
Prof. Gardner Ackley of the
economics department will speak
on "Economic Problems of Post-
war Italy" at 8 p.m. tomorrow in
the Rackham amphitheater.
He recently returned from a
year's stay in Italy on a Fulbright
grant.

Monday but rather an accumula-
tion of the same kind of doubtful
news about business and the econ-
omy in general.
There were further reports of
cutbacks, "stretch-outs" and lay-
offs which underlined Wall Street's
concern about tight money.
The steel industry's operating
rates slipped below 80 per cent of
capacity.
Prices Slipped
Stock prices, already relatively
low for new investors or short-
term traders, began to slip. Selling
begat more selling. Despite the
high margin requirements for
stock purchases, brokerage houses
began sending out calls for more
margin. In distress cases, this mar-
gin was not forthcoming and these
"weak accounts" were cleaned out.
On Tuesday a vigorous early
rally washed-out by afternoon and
prices slid off moderately, but it
was a turbulent session with trad-
ing volume up to 5,090,000 shares,
a two-year daily record.
President Dwight Eisenhower's
speech that night in which he bade
Americans 'banish "morbid pessi-
mism" and announced his inten-
tion of making a series of affirma-
tive speeches on the nation's econ-
omy, defense and scientific
achievements was generally re-
garded as the turning point.
Rally Recalls 1929
The market rebounded. The as-
tounding Wednesday rally was one
for the history books. It was the
biggest in 28 years-the biggest
since '29. But mention of that
tragic year brought an undercur-
rent of mumblings among investors
and commentators. Any connection
with the 1929 events is unwelcome
in Wall Street. The resemblance
between the current period and '29
is superficial.
Rave a WORLD of FUNI
Tavel with fHITA
L , Unbelievable Low Cost
~Earo e.
60 Days., ., frem $585
Oi'ient
43.65 Days ..d, from $998
Many tours inclue
Ste. ~ college credit.
SQ~x Also tow-cost trips to Moexie.
$149 up,South America $699 up,
Hawaii Study Tour $498 up and
Around the World $1398 up.
Ask Your Travel Agent
2t Var WO LDTRAVEL , INC.
or Campus representative:
MISS HELEN SARBEY
Fletcher Hall
University of Michigan

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WALL STREET SHAKES:
Stock Market Concludes
Historically Hectic Week

"CONSISTENTLY FINE!" --Times
"AMAZING!"-- News
"SUPERIOR ACTING!"-Post

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-Daily--James MacKay%.
GAIL PONTE
homecoming queen
DAC Expands
City Programs
Ann Arbor's Dramatic Arts Cen-
ter is presently exploring avenues
for maintaining and expanding a
dramatics programO Richard Rob-
inson, president. of the group,
noted yesterday.
He said the group is now con-
sidering full scale 'production of
plays by amateur casts. Robinson
also observed that thegroup's.
Board of Directors hopes the pro-
fessional theatre miay somn be re-
established in a suitable home.
Robinson explained that after
the group was forded to leave its
Masonic Temple quarters last
spring, financial difficulties forced
the group to close its professional
theatre.
Architect Wins
Group Award
Architect Alden B. Dow, design-
er of the new Ann Arbor Public
Library received an award yester-
day from the Michigan Library
Association.
Dow, a former student of Frank
Lloyd Wright, was cited "for the
outstanding contribution he has
made to architecture in general
and library architecture in partic-
ular."

,'-

'U' Students Travel Abroad; Study at Vienna

Many University students await
the day they will be able to trav-
el abroad.
Others dream of attending a
foreign university at some future
date. Richard Jasinski '60 and
Arthur Simon '58 did both last
year.
Attending the University of Vi-
enna under the auspices of the
Institutene ofEuropean Studies,
they observed Europe's education-
al facilities and customs first
hand.
Sent by IES
They were two of 60 IES spon-
sored students traveling and
studying abroad. Austrian families
housed then Americans during
their stay in Vienna.
"For the first semester, we lived
with a widowed Czechoslovakian
refugee. Her home had no bath or
hot water and our room was heat-
ed by a coal-fired stove," Jasinski
recalled.
The students eat lunch and din-
ner together at IFS headquarters
in downtown Vienna but live with
their Austrian hosts. Separate
study facilities, classrooms and a

library are available in an IES
building that formerly was the
home of a Hapsburg duke.
Has No Campus
"The University of Vienna has
no campus as we think of one,"
Simon explained. "There is only
one main building and no univer-
sity dormitories for the students."
Students show a great deal of
respect for their professors, many
of which are of the old nobility,
Jasinski said. "The dean of the
school was once a baron. My rid-
ing instructress once claimed the
title of 'baroness.'
"When the professor enters the
classroom or lecture hall, every-
one rises to greet him. If the stu-
dents liked the lecture very much,
they show their approval by
pounding their fists on the desks,"
Simon added .
Organize Athletics
Organized athletics are not
sponsored by the university. Stu-
dents wishing to participate in a
sport band together and form
their own competition.
"There are social fraternities
but they are quite different from
the ones here at the University.
The members meet in the neigh-
borhood bar or any other avail-
able place," Jasinski explained.
"They have no fraternity houses."
The pair had the opportunity
of speaking with a few Hungarian
students who took part in last
year's revolt. "They didn't like to
talk about the actual uprising,"
Jasinski said.
Stress Hardship
"But they did stress the hard-
ships of the people under Com-
munist rule. 'There is nothing to

buy and nothing to buy it with'
was the most frequent criticism,"
he added.
Many IES students helped at
the various refugee camps in Aus-
tria. "Student groups, organized
by the Austrian student body,
spent several weeks at the camps,"
Simon comrriented.
During the first four years that
the IES has been in existence,
about 400 United States students
from 100 colleges and universities
have participated in the program.
Students pay approimately $1,-'
780 for the entire trip.
All travel, including the boat
trip from and to the United
States ,tuition at the University of
Vienna and room and board for
the entire year is included in the
fee.

L.

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BE SHOCKED!

This Thurs., Fri., Sat.

By the

"ELECTRIFYING"
."SPINE-TINGLI

-N.Y. Daily News
NGJ -Herald-Trib.

A,

p

il

"UN FORGETTABLE"-World Tel. sun
"PLAY of SUBSTANCE"-N.Y. Times

UI

But don't you see,
you save at
/11//el
SUPPER CLUB
Sunday, Oct. 27
6:04 P.M.
Members 75c

0
;,

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A IIATF UL

in LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
BOX OFFICE OPENS
MONDAY, 10 A.M.

oF RAINV

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Reserve seats early

I

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by MICHAEL V. GAZZO for this one!
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE. .. DIRECTOR, TED HEUSEL

-U

This great suspense
story starts
TODAY

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DIAL
NO 2-2513

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Cinetna(' dd
TONIGHTat 8
"THE LADY VANISHES"

. . . Premieres TODAY . .
"ROLLICKING ENGLISH COMEDY!
Frank Launder and Sidney Gilliat have done it again
with 'The Green Man'. Crazy, incredible .. .
flammable and fun!"-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
"A MASTERPIECE OF COMEDY... a joy to
watch ... Alastair Sim is one of the funniest men in
the public domain today, and this movie gives him
total freedom. Brilliant!"-wm. K. Zinsser, Herald Tribune
"DESERVES OUR THANKS!"
-John McCarten, New Yorker

.l

, .
t

EXTRA...
2nd in our Series
of Travel and Adventure
Films -
"AROUND THE WORLD
IN TEN WEEKS"
1t°T'1 i t*1 F.

ON,

i

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