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October 25, 1957 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-25

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,GE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAIRY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25.:2957

GE WO HEMICIGA DILYPRYIA. ( VV1 VTEMU1iW 9.10$F "

JAZZ IN CONCERT
Bob Detwiler Tentette
Above the Sugar Bowl
SUNDAY 7 till 9
Tickets at the door

UNIVERSITIES HOLD KEY:
Pakistan Evaluates Educational System

~--

- - - ,r!

OPENING SUNDAY-October 27
The Prop Drive-In
5577 Plymouth Road
6 Miles East of Ann Arbor
serving PIZZA, STEAKS, CHOPS, ETC.

0

Hours 9 A.M.,to 11 P.M.

Jim Gilmore

TONIGHT AT 7 and 9:10
andMR. HYDE"
with
SPENCER TRACY
INGRID BERGMAN
LANA TURNER
Saturday at 7 and 9 P.M.
Sunday at 8 P.M.
"THE L D.
with
MICHAEL REDGRAVE
MARGARET LOCKWOOD
PAUL LUKAS
also "INTERPLAY",- a short
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

By PHILIP MUNCK
Six regional Universities and the
130 colleges composing them hold
the key to the educational and
scientific future of Pakistan, Mu-
haipmad S. Huq, Pakistan's Cul-
tural and Educational Attache to
the United States, said yestrday.
Huq explained that his country
is currently re-examining its phi-
losophy of education. This same
re-examination, he added, is going
on throughout the world.
He said that, like many coun-
tries, education in Pakistan has
been based on a system similar to
that in England. This means that
only a limited number of students,
competetively chosen, are allowed
to attend college.
Educate People
"We now feel," he said, "that
our task is not merely to turn out
a limited number of highly edu-
cated people for positions in gov-
ernment and a few commercial
jobs, but -rather to educate the
people."
He said further that everyone
must have a basic, minimum edu-
cation to live together in a com-
munity. This he said is now Pakis-
tan's goal.
At the time of Pakistan's in-
dependence, in 1947, he explained,
there were 3.4 million students in
elementary schools. There are now
5.6 million and, under the current
five year program, Pakistan will
try to put another million into
school.
Faces Shortage
Because of this new influx of
pupils, the country faces a critical
shortage of teachers as well as
the ever-present need for scientific
personel.
Music Group
Plans Concert
University Woodwind Quintet'
in cooperation with the University
Extension Service will present a
concert in Rackham Educational
Memorial at 8:30 p.m. tonight in
Detroit. .
The program will include se-
lections by Reicha, Malipiero,
Heiden, Mozart and Doran. This
is their first performance in De-
troit.
On LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
STAGE
NEXT WEEK!
Oct. 31, Nov. 1, 2
the
"UNFORGETABLE"
-N.Y. World Telegram
Broadway Hit
ftATFUL
F RAINJ
Box Office Opens Mon., Oct. 28
Ann Arbor CIVIC THEATRE

Ceramics
Specialist
To Lecture
Master-potter, Marguerite Wil-
denhain will deliver a lecture on
her specialty-ceramics-in Rack-
ham Amphitheatre at 4:15 p.m.
Monday.
Her appearance is being spon-
sored by the architecture college.
Miss Wildenhain, who is both
teacher and artist, has nad much
of her work exhibited in museums
around the country. She was
awarded the degree of master-pot-
ter by the Bauhaus, in Weimar,
Germany, after a seven-year ten-
ure of studying and working as an
apprentice.
She served as director of the
ceramics department at a German
school, and worked fo- a porcelain
manufacturer until the rise of
Hitler. At that time she moved to
Putten, Holland, where she main-
tained a workshop.

Influenza Virus Prefers
Healthy Cell to Sick Cell

"Keeping in good physical con-
dition has little effect in ward-
ing off influenza . . . in fact, vi-
ruses seem to prefer healthy cells
to sick cells," Prof. Gordon C.
Brown, of the medical school said.
last night at the annual pharma-
cy lecture series.
"Of course good condition keeps
Educational
Conference
To Host Group
Prof. Walter Sindlinger of the
education school, will open the
28th annual Parent Education In-
stitute Nov. 6 with an address in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Theme of the institute will be
"Growing Up in Modern Amer-
ica." Prof. Sindlinger will speak
on "College-A Grade School De-
cision," at the opening -assembly.
The one-day conference is
sponsored by the University Ex-
tension Service and the Michigan
Congress of Parents and Teach-
ers. Between 400 and 500 people
are expected.
The afternoon assembly will
feature a panel discussion on
"The Family Group in Modern
America." Following that, Rack-
ham will play host to various
study groups on pre-school, ele-
mentary, Junior and senior high
schools.
The conference will end with
a dinner at the .Congregational
Church Parish Hall. Speaker will
be Prof. Edward Stasheff, of the
speech department, whd will dis-
cuss "The Case of Children vs.
Television." The dinner is sched-
uled to begin at 5:45 p.m.
Arrangements for the institute's
program are being handled by
Everett J. Soop, Director of the
University's Extension Service.

up one's resistance to secondary
cases which cause the more seri-
ous effects." he continued.
Prof. Brown explained that it
is impossible to have complete
confidence in the flu vaccina-
tion, because there are so many#
substrains of virus. Immunity to
one doesnt mean a person can't
catch another over which the
vaccination has no control.
In all four types has been iso-
lated -A.,B.,A., and A".
Prof. Brown traced the history
of the flu from the epidemic of"
1918, whichkilled 20 million peo-
ple, through the more recent
epidemics.
The 1957 type flu started in
Hong Kong, but is believed to4
have been carried there from
Northern 'China or Russia. Brown4
suggests that it might have been
another "Russian first."

_

Group Seeks

a
5

i E -Daily-Richard Lund
CULTURAL HERITAGE-Sulaiman Kakli, Grad., and Muhammad
Huq, Cultural and Educational Attache to the United States from
Pakistan discuss Huq's visit to the University. He is visiting the

League Plans
Fall Meeting'

eY
'; >

Pakistan students here (one ofI
States).
This, he explained, is why Pakis-
tan has entered into aid programs
with the United States and other
countries.
Under these programs, students
from Pakistan are sent abroad to.
become engineers, teachers, spe-
cialists, scientific personel.
Given Scholarships
These students are sent to school
either through Pakistani govern-
ment scholarships or joint Pakis-
tani and American scholarships.
Under the next five year pro-
gram, these trained students will
furnish the basis for establishing
new science departments and the
enlargement of existing facilities,
he said.
Already, Huq said, two new poly-
technic institutes, two home eco-
nomics colleges and 12 technical
high schools are being planned for
the near future.
Help Adults
He added, that this is not the
whole problem. "If we can give all
children the education they need,
we are still faced with a huge adult
population which has never been
to school and without their educa-
tion our country will remain eco-
nomically agricultural."
Huq explained that his Job as
cultural attache involved mainly
three functions:
1) Taking care of Pakistani stu-
dents in the United States,
2) Promoting cultural exchanges
between the United States and his
country and
3) Keeping Pakistan informed
on current developments in educa-
tion in this country.
Promote Exchange
In addition, he added, he assists
in promoting the exchange of sci-
entific and educational personnel

the largest groups in the United
between the United States and
Pakistan.
"We are currently exchanging
students with five American uni-
versities," he said, elaborating on
his country's exchange program
with the United States.
The schools trading students
are: Texas A&M with Dacca Uni-
versity, Washington State Univer-
sity with Punjab University, Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania with Kara-
chi University, Colorado S t a t e
University with Beshawar Univer-
sity and New Mexico A&M with
Sind University.
These students, he explained,
will help enable Pakistan to ac-
complish its goal to "supply educa-
tion to all future citizens and raise
the living standard of common
men to a decent level."

Financial Aid
For Colleges
Support for higher education
in Michigan was the subject of a
discussion by the governing
boards and presidents of the nine
state supported colleges held yes-
terday at the University.
Also discussed at the meeting
was the present enrollment pic-
ture in the state.
Both problems discussed are in
the "urgent" category for higher
education in Michigan. The dis-
cussion was focused on financial
aspects of the problems, especially
on the needs for 'scholarships and
loan programs.
University Regent Roscoe 0.
Bonisteel presided over the meet-
ing which had an attendance of
approximately 40, including Gov-
ernor G. Mennen Williams.

For Alumne
The Alumnae Council of tho
Alumni Association expects ap-
proximately 100 University alum-
nae leaders from throughout the
country to attend their annual
fall meeting Saturday at the
League.
Clyde Vroman, director of ad-
missions, will highlight the meet-
ing with a talk on "Admission and
the Tidal Wave" following the
luncheon.
Registration and a coffee hour
will open the morning session at
9:15 a.m. Deborah Bacon, Dean of
Women, and Regent Vera Baits,
of Birmingham, will be , mong >
those greeting the alumnae dur-
ing the meeting.,

MSU INTERVIEWS:
Factory Workers Prefer
Highly Automated Positions

STUDENT RATES
at
Ann Arbor Recreation
Automatic Bowling
NO 2-0 103 605 East Huron

fI
i
I

Interviews with 125 workers in
a highly automated Detroit fac-
tory has revealed that they pre-
fer their jobs to those that are
non-automated.
The interviews were part of a
study on automation made by
William A. Faunce, of the Michi-
gan State University Department
of Sociology and .Anthropology
and the Labor and Industrial Re-
lations Center.
The decrease in handling of
materials and physical. effort
were two of the principle factors
in the preference for automation,
according to Faunce.
He also said that workers feel
that automated jobs hold more
interest and offered a greater
challenge and more responsibility.
There were, however, a number
of criticisms of automation, the
most common of which was the
feeling of isolation it brings.
"Machine noise, increasing dis-
tance between work stations and
the need for closer attention to
work is decreasingrthe social ex-
changes b e t w e e n workers,"
Faunce elaborated.
Among other complaints, work-
ers deplored the increased super-
vision by foremen and superin-

tendents, the increase in tension
due to the constant attention and
great speed necessary, and alien-
ation from the job.
This last is caused by a grow-
ing lack of control over the 'work-
once laboriously acquired are now
ing speed, and the fact that skills
unnecessary.
Scheduled Talk
By Professor
On Securities
Prof. W. J. Witeman, of the
business administration school,
will begin a series of talks under
the general heading of "Would
You Like to Know" sponsored by
the Union Services Committee.
The subject for the first lec-
ture, "How Students with Limited
Funds can Invest in Stocks and
bonds" will be held at 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday in the Union Confer-
ence room.
The series aims to stimulate in-
terset in Academic Activities on
campus, according to Les Lipson..

4

- a: ""V

Come in now for a peek
at the '58 Chevrolet.

lust ask your Chevrolet dealer to
show you the booklet containing
advance information bout the '58
Chevrolet.
You can expect the 1958 Chevrolet
to be new all over. Lines will sweep
rakishly longer, lower and wider.
There will be a completely new V8
engine-radically different in design.
There will be Full Coil suspension
and, for the first time in Chevrolet's

field, incredibly smooth air ride.
Chevrolet will introduce two new
luxury models of outstanding style
and distinction.
You'll learn more 'at your Chevrolet
dealer's. And you can see about an
early delivery that will make you a
'58 Chevrolet-Firster!

High School
Leaders Meet
The 13th annual Michigan Con-
ference of Student Councils will be
held on Oct. 29 at the University.
"Leaders Today and Tomorrow"
will be the theme of the confer-
ence, expected to attract more'
than 1,400 student representatives
and faculty advisors from high
school student councils throughout
the state. -
The meeting is sponsored by the
University Bureau of School Serv-
ices and Extension Service with
the assistance of secondary schools
in the state.
A symposium on "Ideas for Citi-
zenshil Training" will highlight
the opening assembly at 10 a.m.
in Rackham Lecture Hall.
Following a luncheon in the
League Ballroom, the conference
will hear a talk by Ronald Shorn,
'58BAd, administrative vice-presi-
dent of SGC.
Joe Collins, '58 SGC president,
will address the group later in the
afternoon.

... ..... .............

DIAL
2-2513

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Friday and Saturday Nights
Members and Guests
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TODAY
SATURD
She had searched a lifetime
for a moment like this .
now in a romantic foreign land
she had found it - in the arms
of a married man!

AND
DAY

4'

~11

'58 Chevrolet, Thursday, October 31

I

JU~AIN E LYONRSAN Rt
MARIANNE COlK~I'
FRANCOIS[ ROSH " KEITH ANDES 9 RANIES BEN R]AN w TT

rf

I-

also - Color Cartoon * News 0 Specialty.

STUDENT DISCOUNT
tienI thePre~dents &1ba
TONIGHT
AT THE MICHIGAN UNION

Sunday: John Marquand's Book of the Month Best. Seller
STOPOVER: TOKYO
A terrific suspense story of Postwar Japan

A

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Week Nights at 7 and 9
Sat. and Sun. Cont. from 1 P.M.

DIAL
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GRAND PRIZE WINNER -VENICE FILM FESTIVAL!

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