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October 24, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-24

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY,

oc

'T, PRESENT, FUTURE:
1usic Changes with Society-Preussner

By JANICE WILCZNESKI
Music is written for society, and
so as society changes, musicj
changes also, Prof. Eberhard
Preussner, administrative direc-
tor of the Mozarteui , Salzburg,
;Austria, observed yesterday.
Speaking on "Three Periods of
New Music' - 1300, 1600, 1900"
prof. Preussner said that to at-
tempt to divide the steps in a
cuilture like music is hard. To di-'
vide periods into vocal music, or
instrumental music is often
wrong, he said.
Stravinsky once remarked that
thLe age of instrumental music was
doer. Since this remark, Prof.
Preussner said,. many beautiful
and good instrumental sympho-
nies have been written.
Lives in Present
"The man who can understand
today's music, can analyze the
music of the past and predict the
music of the future," he noted.
"In the present is the past and
the future. I live in the present,"
he matter-of-factly said.
When trying to show the dif-
ference between periods, he went
on, musical creations themselves
cannot be compared. One can
only show the difference between
the composers of the various
times and their varying methods.
He called the 1304 period that
age when music and art came
into its own f"'r its own sake. In
this period of great Gothic
churches, all forms of art were
formally connected with the
churches.'
The only music was music for
church services. Then, he said, in
this rich and free age of early'
renaissance, music became ap-
preciated for the artbitself.
Music Changed
He explained that this was a
period of great transition and cre-
ation. In this fluctuating period
after the Middle Ages, music had
to change also.
During the 1600's, the opera,
with all its fugues, was born, Prof..
Preussner continued. -However, he
said, it was cuddled and soon
spoiled.
People then criticized the new
styles, he commented. But, he
went on, people always criticize-
geniuses must be broad-minded.

The new sounds were those of'
the romantic and Viennese school,
stressing the major and the mi-
nor, he said.
Rhythmic Sounds Favored
In 1900, this romantic harmony
died and gave way to a new type
of refinement. This new music, he
observed, began to favor rhythmic
sounds - the range of change-
ability was great. New construc-
tions and a system favoring free
melodic sounds came into being.
Ins 1908, he emphasized, some-
thing very significant happened.
In this year the first abstract
painting was done. Evolution in
music follows and accompanies
evolution in art. And so another
new music was born, he com-
mented - a music without any
object.
This field of abstract composi-
tions, coupled with the even more
recent electronic advances and
with it, electronic music, will
change the entire field of music
once again, he observed.

Changing the subject to com-
posers and compositions, Prof.
Preussner said that writers of
music must use intellect and
sense in their writings.
Song Creates Effect
Continuing, he said that it is
the song that makes the effect.
He noted that listening is all that
is important to the listener.
Emphasizing the subject of
"new style" throughout his talk,
Prof. Preussner said that a really
good composer "cannot" copy an
old style, but starts with and
uses a. new style at all times.
He summarized by saying that
although nothing that happens in
music can be destroyed, compos-
ers must have a creative move-
ment, which by necessity will be
a changing one - and just as so-
ciety changes, so does music. All
one can do is understand the
present and then ask the question
of the future, Prof. Preussner con-
cluded. .-

MUSKET Lists "Kate' Cast,
Seeks New Musical Comedy

MUSKET has announced the
cast for the production of "Kiss
Me Kate" and at the same time
said that t was looking for a
scenario for its 1958 show.
The scenario must be "the typi-
cal musical comedy formula and
completely original," according to
Larry Kass, '60, MUSKET's ma-
terial scout.
The deadline for scenarios is
Dec. 13 in the MUSKET office.
Bruce McRitchie, '59, explained
that the original purpose of MUS-
KET was to present good locally
written musical comedies, even
though they have been forced to
use Broadway shows for the last
two years.
"If we have a good original show
we will put it on rathcr than a
Broadway production," he elabo-
rated.
Meanwhile, the lead parts for
this year's show, "Kiss Me Kate"
have been assigned, with the two
main leads-Fred and Lilli--going
to George McWhorter and Mar-,
gartet Whinery, '58SM.

TODAY:
Florence
Orchestra
To Appear
Making its first appearance in
Ann Arbor, the Symphony Or-
chestra of the Florence Festival
will give the second concert of
the Extra Concert Series at 8:30
p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
The program which will accent
Italian music will include "La
Scala di Seta" by Rossini, "Sym-
phony in D Major" by Cherubini,
"Sinfonia Americana" by Franco
Mannino, suite from "La Pisanel-
la" by Pizzeti, and Overtures, "I
Vespri Siciliani" by Verdi.
Carlo Zecchi will conduct the
Symphony Orchestra.
The orchestra has long been
identified with the May Festival,
the Maggio Musicale, in Florence;
however, it is now established on
a permanent basis.
Conductor Zecchi, an interna-
tionally known pianist, at one
time gave up his playing due to
an automobile accident. Now he
plays chamber music and teaches
at the Santa Cecilia Academy of
Rome and the Mozarteum of Salz-
burg, Austria.
The orchestra ranks among
Italy's top orchestras, known for
its teamwork and equilibrium be-
tween string and wind instru-
ments.
In 1933, the Maggio Musicale, or
Florentine May Festival, was in-
augurated, and the city's sym-
phony orchestra became the Flor-
ence Festival Symphony Orches-
tra,
A&D Faculty
Exhibits Art
Eighteen Univerity faculty mem-
bers have submitted works for an
exhibit that began yesterday at
the Detroit Artists Market.
Exhibiting their works are Mil-
ton Cohen, James Anthony,rJames
Eldridge, Prof.rJack Garbutt, Prof.
Gerome Kamrowski, Prof. Chet
LaMore, Irving Kaufman, Thomas
Larkin, Thomas McClure, Marie
Woo, Prof. Albert Mullen, Prof.
Richard Wilt, Prof. James Pren-
dergast, Prof. Frede Vidar, Albert
Weber, Prof. Leonard Zamiska,
William Lewis and Guy Palazzola,
all of the architecture college.
The showing, which will run
through Nov. 11, will consist of
painting, sculpture, ceramics and
jewelry. The gallery is open from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
... :vis ?{ .C: ".. -r'r...
."C' .

Visiting
I. Streeter
sued an

Rosie Palen and Bruce Wilson,
'60SM, received the second lead
parts of Lois and Bill, while the
two gunmen are Gershon Morning-
star, Spec., and Jim Ellis '58BAd.
Dwight Davis, '59E, James Ueber-
horst, and Bob Denison, '60L, will
portray, respectively, Hortension,
Gremio and Baptista.
The parts of Harrison Howell
and Hattie have been given to
Michael McArdle, '59, and Mable
Houze; '58.
Rehearsals will begin Saturday
at 9 a.m., and fittings will be be-
tween 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. Thursday
and Friday.
Re'sidents Aim
At .Annexation
Residents of Ann Arbor Hills
have begun efforts aimed at be-
coming a part of Ann Arbor pro-
per.
A special meeting of the sub-
division's Homes Association voted
to authorize the group to "pro-
vide the necessary mechanics for
setting up an annexation proposal
for annexation to the .city of Ann
Arbor on a future ballot."
No date for an election was
mentioned. This will be the third
attempt at annexation of the
area.
} > ?.rs"x amr:""?bi:m :'" :S: :: i" :"f s;:..' '"

The University of

MUNSTER CHOIR'
FROM GERMANY

III

NOW

If r
. Week Nights at 7 and 9 . .

DIAL
NO 8-6416

I

presents

GRAND PRIZE WINNER -VENICE FILM FESTIVAL!

A FREE CONCERT
THIS SATURDAY in HILL AUDITORIUM
at 8:30 P.M.
Sponsored by the U of M Glee Club

TONIGHT at 7 and 9:10 P.M.
w Friday at 7 and9:10 P.M
"DR. JEKYLL
and MR. HYDE"
with
SPENCER TRACY
INGRID BERGMAN
LANA TURNER
Saturday at 7 and 9 P.M.
Sunday at 8 P.M.
"THE LADY
VAN ISH ES"
with
A * -A - fSW - -A\ 1t1

"HIGHEST RATING! EXCELLENT!"-N.Y. Post
* * Next Attraction * * *
ALASTAIR SIM in "THE GREEN MAN"

Starting
TODAY

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fe-zJDL~~hI'p~ENO02-2513

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