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October 19, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY OCTOBER 19, 1951

THE AUCHIGAN DAILY

PAGEI

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1957 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGT

FROM SCATTERED SOURCES:
Regents Accept $468,837.70 in Grants

I;
I _______________
II t

University Regents Friday ac-
cepted $468,837.70 in gifts, grants
and bequests which came from
such scattered sources as an
anonymous donor and the. Ford
'i Foundation.
Three grants from the Ford
Foundation, totaling $179,250 were
accepted. The largest grant, $100,-
000, is to facilitate the basic re-
search of Prof. James Olds of the
psychology department for a five-
year period.
Another,$75,000, is for support
of research in the behavioral
science. The foundation made this
grant with the understanding that
jthe Iniversity would match the
amount with $50,000. A third grant
for $4,250 was also given for re-
search in the behavioral sciences.
Museum Gets Donation
Second largest donation was
from the estate of Walter R. Park-
er of Detroit. This amounted to
$137,198.04 from the sale of securi-
ties for the. Margaret Watson
Parker Art Collection Fund for use
by the Museum of Art
An amount of $37,811.38 was ac-
cepted by the Regents from the
', estate of William A. Spitzley, also
of Detroit. This was in addition to
the $100,000 Charles B. de Nan-
crede Memorial Fund which has
been established for use by the
medical school.
Lawrence J. Montgomery of
Battle Creek donated $25,000 in
the form of a grant for deserving
medical students to further their
educatir"
Asian Course Supported
A grant of $25,000 to support
* a new undergraduate course on
Asia was accepted from the Car-
negie Corporation. From New York
,s
Marine Corps
Career Advice
Given Monday.
Students interested in the
United States Marine Corps will
hve the opportunity to satisfy
their curiosity next week.
First Lt. Perry M. Peterson, pro-
curement officer for Michigan,
will be on campus from Monday
to Friday.
Peterson will be located in Ma-
son Hall the first three days and
in the engineering college for the
last two days. He will interview,
test and provide informatior for
those students interested in be-
coming Marine Corps officers.
The Corps provides two pro-
grams leading to a commission as
second lieutenant. The platoon
leader class involves two six week
summer training sessions. Upon
graduation from college the par-
ticipant in this program is com-
missioned.
Graduating seniors and recent
graduates may apply for a ten
week officer candidate course.
Upon completion of the course
the candidate is commissioned.
Both programs offer a choice
of ground or aviation duty. Ac-
tive duty is three years for ground
officers and about three and a
half years for pilots.
College women interested in a
commission in the women ma-
rines may participate in programs
similar to those outlined for the
m ales..

came a $12,000 grant from the
Research Corporation.
American Metal Products Co.
and Ex-Cello-O Corporation do-
nated $5,000 each towards the In-
dustry Program of the engineering
college.
Accept Two Grants
Two grants totaling $6,000 for
the Lawrence D. Bell scholarship
and the Robert J '"roods Memorial
Fellowship were accepted from the
Bell Foundation.
The Board of Governors of the

Lawyers Club donated $5,000 for
the Lawyers Club Research Fund.
Another $5,000 gift was accepted
from the Kenneth H. Campbell
Fund for neurological research.
Three grants amounting to $4,775
came from Parke, Davis and Com-
pany for pharmacology research.
An anonymous donor contrib-
uted $3,600 for the iPediatrics As-
sistance Fund to be used to ,on-
tinue the salary of F, secretary to
aid in clinical research in the
pediatrics department.

The Regents accepted an offer
from the Society of Naval Archi-
tects and Marine Engineers to es-
tablish a scholarship program for
undergraduates in the field of
naval architecture. The scholar-
ship will consist of $1,000 each
year for one incoming freshman,
one sophomore, one junior and one
senior.
The Pinewood Fund, Washing-
ton, D. C., allocated $3,000 for two
graduate fellowships in conserva-
tion research.

New Assistant Medical Dean NamedI

i

Dr. Robert G. Lovell, '44M, as-
sociate professor of internal med-
icine and secretary of the, medical
school, was appointed assistant
dean of the school at yesterday's
Regents' meeting. I
Lovell, whose appointment is
effective Nov. 1, has been
handling the admissions portion
of the medical school since the
death of assistant 'dean Wayne
Whitaker on Sept. 29.
The new assistant dean has
been associated with the Univer-
sity for many years. After gradu-
ating from University High School
in 1938, he went on to the Uni-
versity to receive his M.D. degree
in 1944. Having completed his
postgraduate study and intern-
ship at University Hospital,. Dr.
Lovell joined the medical school
faculty in 1950.
Served in Air Force
From February, 1955, until Aug-
ust of 1956, Dr. Lovell was on ac-
tive duty with the United States
Air Force. When he returned to
the University he was appointed
secretary of the medical school.
Additional changes in the medi--
cal school staff include the ap-
pointment of Dr. Charles J. Tup-
per, of the Medical School, to the
position of secretary of the
school.
Raymand E. Knauff, research
associate in internal medicine,
has been appointed an assistant
professor of biological chemistry
in the Department of Internal
Medicine.
In the literary college, Prof.
John H. Muyskens, of the speech
department, who has been on a
retirement furlough for the past
year, was appointed a consultant
in speech until December 31.
Appoint Visiting Professor
Geert Wielenga was appointed
Netherlands visiting professor in
the education school for the next
school year while Ruth D. Ballam
was made an assistant professor,
of public health nursing in the
School of Public Health.
Nine committee appointments
were approved by the Regents
The Committee on University
Scholarships will include Prof.
Walter V. Marshall, assistant dean
of the architecture college. Prof.
Marshall succeeds himself for a
two-year term ending 'June 30,
1959. Benno G. Fricke of the Bu-
reau of Psychological Services
also succeeds himself for a one-
year term ending June 30, 1958.
Prof. Richard A. Deno, of the
pharmacy college, was appointed
to the committee to succeed Prof.
Franklin B. Newman, of toe Eng-
lish department, who has esigned
from the committee.

Named for three-year terms
ending June 30, 3960 were Harold
K. Jacobson and Prof. Ross N.
Pearson, of the geography depart-
ment.
Hayward Replaces Easlick
Dr. James R. Hayward, of the
dental school, was appointed to
a three-year term ending Oct. 31,
1960 on the Executive Committee
of the School of Dentistry. Dr.
Hayward is replacing Dr. Ken-
neth A. Easlick, of the dental
school, whose term has expired.
The representative of the Hos-
pital Committee on Consultation
to the Board in Control of the
University Hospital will be Dr.
F. Bruce Fralick, chairman of the
department of ophthalmology in
the Medical School. Dr. Fralick
was appointed for a one-year term
ending Sept. 30, 1958.
Two appointments were made
to the Executive Committee of the
Universiy of Michigan Press. Prof.
George Katona of the psychology
department will succeed himself
and Prof. Rogers McVaugh of
the botany departmen, will suc-
ceed Prof. Frederick K. Sparrow,
Jr., also of the botany depart-
Both professors were appointed
to three year terms 'ending Sept.
30, 1960.

The sick leave of Prof. Aloysius
J. Gaims of the German depart-
ment was extended to include the
first semester of the present aca-
demic year.
Two leaves without salary were
also granted. Jess H. Nourse, re-
search engineer in the Engineer-
ing Research Institute, was 'given
a leave from Dec. 1. 1957 to Nov.
30, 1958. Mohammad A. El-Mos-
limany, a graduate research as-
sistant in the Engineering Re-
search Institute, was granted a
leave from Oct. 1, 1957 to Feb. 1,
1958 to work more intensively on
his doctorate degree.
Prof. Hymna
Writes Book
A new book of Prof. Albert Hyma
of the history department, "Martin
Luther and the Luther Film of
1953," has just been published by
a local publisher.
Thebook outlines Luther's life
from his years in the Erfurt mon-
astery until his death, and includes
a chapter in which Prof. Hyma at-
tempts a "proper evaluation" of
Luther's life.

Co liege Roundup'

"Graduate schools must as-
sume the major responsibility for
research," according to Dr. Theo-
dore Blegen, dean of the Univer-
sity of Minnesota graduate school,
as reported in the Ohio State
"Lantern."
Dr. Blegen said the fundamen-
tal needs of the Graduate School
are a good faculty with a vigor to
stimulate students as well as stu-
dents who are mature and intel-
ligent.
"Our obligation is to forward
research and transmit knowl-
edge," said Dr. Blegen. "It is our
key to the future."
"A graduate student is not a
machine, but a highly educated
human being, sensitive to a thous-
and influences, instructed by the
past and influenced by the fu-
ture," concluded Dr. Blegen.
* * *

The average
ly contented,
centered, and

college is glorious-
unabashedly self-
has little or no

sense of values, according to a re-
cent survey taken at the Univer-
sity of Colorado and other cam-
puses.
"Today's students are passive
and p e r m i s s i v e rather than
thoughtful about many values.
For example, because they accept
the idea of a homogenized culture,
they have an easy tolerance for
racial, ethnic and social diversity.
But they never crusade for an end
to discrimination," says Walter
Lovelace, director of Colorado
University's News Bureau. He was
analyzing a study by Philip E.
Jacob, professor of political sci-
ence at the University of Penn-
sylvania.
One professor pointed a finger
at the older generation and said
society is to blame for the atti-
tudes of today's students.
"After all, it has catered to
them, babied them and made the
world in the young people's im-
age," he said.
, * *
Sooner or later every college
newspaper publishes its definition
of a coed. The folloving are ex-
cerpts from Louisiana State Uni-
versity's definition.
"Coeds come equipped with as-
sorted pedal pushers and hairdos
... they can be found in all places,
lounging on, draping around,
leaning against, bursting to, and
traipsing from . . . to her admir-
ers she has the mind of Einstein,
the looks of Kim, the personality
of Grace, and the figure of Mari-
lyn. To other coeds she has the
form of a beer bottle, the person-
ality of a wet mackerel, and the
mind of a oeetie .
"Coeds love week ends, formals,
cashmere sweaters, red convert-
ibles and men . .. she doesn't like
8 o'clock classes, Monday morn-
ings and English deadlines . . .
she may remain a bobby soxer or
attain the dignity of mink, but in
between she is the curious phe-
nomenon known as . .. a coed."

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
RARE VIOLINS
BOWS AND ACCESSORIES
All repairs promptly serviced
by two competent repairmen.
MADDY MUSIC
508 S. William NO 3-3223
)X11
HI FI STUDIO
An amazing inventory of Hi F!
components available to you at
catalogue price.
KITS
We stock amplifier,AM-FM tuner,
and speaker enclosure kits in sev-
eral brands.
HI FI SERVICE
Our engineers and technicians are
fully competent and equipped to
service all equipment we sell, and
to advise you on the selection of
components.
1217 & 1317 So. University
(one block East of
new Campus Theatre)
NO 8-7942
1X9
HI-FI EQUIPMENT deals. Student
agent-Below net prices. Phone NO
5-6644 and ask for Tan. )X8
STROMBERG-CARLSON, PILOT
MAGNAVOX, and COLUMBIA
HI-FI RECORD PLAYERS
$29.95 and up - easy terms
MUSIC CENTER
300 S. Thayer NO 2-2500
)X13
BUSINESS SERVICES
PRINTING
Specialties - 24 hour service
News Letters - Stationery
Fraternities - Sororities
Invites - Programs
Posters - Tickets
ROACH PRINTING -- Ph. NO 8-8132
415 Detroit (opposite Farmer's Market)
)J7
DON'T BE CAUGHT BY
COLD WEATHER. GET YOUR
FALL CHANGEOVER
NOW
Golden's Service' Station 601 Packard
NO 8-9429 )J15'
Shoes repaired and shined
Fine Tailoring
SANFOR'S
While you wait service
119 East Ann St.
NO 8-696
Open 8 till 8 Sat. 8 till 10
30 years in same location
(opposite court house)
)J5
ANN ARBOR
EMPLOYERS PERSONNEL
504 First National Bldg.
NO 5-6107
)J12
WILLIS PACKING CO.
Huron River Branch
Freezer Lockers for Rent
331 E. William, Ann Arbor
Call Huron River plant for
information-HU 2-1685.
Home Freezer Meats' & Vegetables
READY FOR Saturday's game, those
all-leather coats. Tweeds and poplins.
Topper length from $17.95. Car coats
from $14.95. Elizabeth Dillon Shop,
on Forest, around corner of South U.,
opposite the Campus Theater. )J28
TYPING service of superior- quality
offered by experienced manuscript
typist. Call 2-1038 evenings or week-
ends. )J29
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)J2
IMPORTED CANDY
AND
GROCERI ES
CLEAN COOKED AND D-VEINED
SHRIMP

FOR COCKTAILS
Washington Fish Market
208 E. Washington NO 2-2589
)J26
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Store clerk, part-time; ex-
perienced preferred. Good wages. Ap
ply in person only. Sam's Store, 122
E. Washington. )H30
WANTED - Cab drivers, full or part
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Co. Phone
NO 8-9382. )H5
PART TIME-Evenings and Saturdays.
World wide concern hasopenings for
aggressive and neat appearing college
students. High earnings if you can
qualify. Pleasant working conditions
and good chance for advancement
after college. Apply in person, 101 S.
Fourth Ave. on Tuesdays, 3 o'clock.
)H33
Read. the Classifieds

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES I DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .80 2.00 2.96
3 .96 2.40 3.55
4 1.12 2.80 4.14
Figure 5 overage words to o line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily.
Phone NO 2-3241
PERSONAL
DISTINCT STYLING in fabric and
fur. Fur accessories.
MARGARET SHOP
51 East Liberty )F5
ATTENTION golfersI Play golf at scenic
Municipal Golf Course. 18 holes.
Open through November. Reasonable
rates. Pro shop full of bargains.
Municipal Golf Course, 1519 Fuller
Road, NO 8-9230. )F38
FALL IS FALLING
The leaves are turning
The weather is gay
If a great time you're yearning
It's Campbell's Bakery without delay.
CAMPBELL BAKERY
219 N. Main NO 8-9880
Order Now - We Deliver
)F39
SIX TICKETS wanted for the Minne-
sota game. Call Sam Riggs at NO
2-3256. )F51
WE'LL BE OPEN all week-end except
during the game. Special student-
faculty rates to mags. Student Period-
ioal, NO 2-3061. )F43
FOR SALE
FOR' SALE: Complete Hi-F System
consisting of miraphon turntable
with GE cartridge, grommes ampli-
fier, Wharfdale speaker in RJ enclo-
sure. If interested call NO 2-5810.
)B45
8 ROOMS OF FURNITURE: Desks, chest
of drawers, beds, dining-sets, tables,
chairs, and davenports. Private home
owned. 601 Miller. Call NO 5-923.
)B44
FOR SALE -Three tuxedos andone
tails, size small to medium. Cheap.
NO 5-6923. )B48
Large size throw rugs-choice of col-
ors. Values up to $15 now at $4.95
while they last. Open Mon. evening.
Smith Floor Covering
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
)B42
ARMY-NAVY type oxfords - $7.25;
socks, 39c; shorts, 69c; military sup-
plies. Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)BI
GENUINE RACCOON coat less than 3
yrs. old. Size 14-16, % length. Ex-
cellent condition. Worn about 8 times.
$150 or best offer. Call GA 4-2884.
Moving West. )B46
NEW 8 Transitor Radio. Cost $83; Sell
$50. NO 3-0521, Ex. 326. )B47
UNDERWOOD Po r t a b 1 e Typewriter,
barely used. $35. NO 3-8291. )B49
HOUSE FULL OF FURNITURE! Bar-
gains. Must sell! Usable furniture,
cheap Chairs, 75c; davenports, $2-$8;
tables, $1-$4. Alo stoves, dining room
table, buffetts, china cabinet, chests,
lamps. 601 -Miller. NO 5-6923. )B50
36' HOUSE TRAILER, 2 years old. $2,000.
Call NO 3-8960. )B51
TWO Over-stuffed chairs, excellent con-
dition; double Hollywood bed, inner-
springs; ABC-O-Matic washer. For
sale at real bargains. Call NO 2-5397
evenings. )B52
FOR RENT
ATTENTION STUDENTS - TRAILER
SPACE AVAILABLE. Car pool now
forming, excellent water and road.
20 minutes east of Ann Arbor. Mich-
igan at Hagerty Rd. Canton Mobile
Village, Wayne, Michigan. )C
ATTRACTIVE DOUBLE
Newly furnished and decorated. Close
to campus.. Men students call NO
2-3541. )C45
LARGE APT. suitable for four adults.
On campus. Call NO 3-5201. Ask for
Kay. )C47

LOST-Red key case and red mitten
lost between Victor Vaughan and
diag. Please contact Barbara Deutsch.
NO 2-5553. )A35
LOST-Brown wallet. Contents impor-
tant. Reward. Call NO 2-2539. )A29
LOST-German Short-hair Pointer. 5
months old. Liver and ticked. Wear-
ing studded leatherncollar. Near Pack-
ard. Reward. Call NO 3-6310. )A38
WOULD whoever picked up my green
billfold by mistake please return it
to 303 Mosher. Very important papers.
Reward! NO 3-1561. )A40
PETS AND SUPPLIES,
TARANTULAS, Alligators, Monkeys,
Hamsters, Guinea pigs, Tropical fish,
aquariums, and supplies. Kitty-litter,
etc.
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM'
328 East Liberty NO 3-0224

DRESSMAKER
Dressmaking and Alterations
Phone NO 2-9541

)PI

CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted tuxedos converted to
single breasted, $18, or new silk shawl
collar, $25. Overcoats $18. Write to
Michaels Tailoring Co., 1425 Broad-
way, Detroit, Michigan, for free de-
tails or phone WOo'dward 3-5776. )P2
MISCELLANEOUS
FOX MOTEL
(formerly Boyd's)
Phone in every room
2805 E. Michigan HU 2-2204
TRANSPORTATION
WANT A RIDE, Champaign, Illinois.
Nov. 8. Call NO 2-3617 evening. )G8
WANTED-Ride to Boston, Thanksgiv-
ing and/or Xmas. Will help drive,
share expenses. Contact John Applin,
NO 2-4401, Ex. 147. )Q9

LOST AND FOUND

EXPERT FOREIGN and
Service Nye Motor Sales,
Washington. NO 3-4858.

Sports C
Inc., 514
, )

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
-I

Open daily except Thursday

)T4

WITH COLD WEATHER
KNOCKING AGAIN

I

Take Advantage of our
$4.95,SPECIAL
INCLUDES:
LUBRICATION
CHASSIS LUBRICATION
OIL CHANGE
BRAKE LINING CHECK
BATTERIES & TERMINALS
ALL RADIATOR HOSE &
FAN BELT CHECKED
PACK FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS
INSTALLATION OF ANTI-FREEZE
ANTI-FREEZE, PARTS, AND OIL ARE EXTRA
JIM WHITE, INC.
209 WEST HURON NO 3-3321
)$9

BABY PARAKEETS and breeders. Ca-
naries. Cages and supplies. AKC
Beagles. 305 W. Hoover. NO 2-2403.
lTi
)N35
ALTERATIONS

USED CARS '
'52 NASH STATESMAN. Bed. 'Good con-
dition. NO 8-6284. )N16
WANTED
We pay top dollars for good used cars.
GENE'S AUTO SALES
544 Detroit St. NO 3-8141
PHOTO SUPPLIES
See the all new
N IKON S.P.
now in our store.
THE QUARRY
320 South State NO 3-1991
)D10
HEILAND Strobonar speed flash unit,
hardly used, from research project.
Portable. Only $40. Call NO 2-5397
evenings. )D14
EXCELLENT BUY!Kodak Master Model
projector with two ektar lenses, case.
Lite new. Only $65. Call NO 2-5397
evenings. )D15
SPEED Graphic camera, 3%x4a with
optar lens, kalart range finder hold-
ers, roll film back, field case, graflex
flash unit. All for only $200-almost
50% off. Call NO 2-5397 evenings.
)D16
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business. At-
las tires, batteries and accessories.
Warranteed & guaranteed. See us for
the best price on new & used tires.
Road service - mechanic on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
,NO 8-9168 )83
WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
2007 South State NO 2-3350
Bumping and Painting
New Atlas Tires
High in quality, low in price. 670x15,
$16.95; 710x15, $18.95; 760x15, $20.95
(exchange). No money down -easy
terms.
Hickey's Service Station
30 N. Main cor. Catherine NO 8-771T
68

YOU R CAREER in research and
O P P O R TUN I T 1development of
missile systems
- /
California nstitute of Technology
JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
PASADENA - CALIFORNIA
Active prrticipation in the quest for scientific truths.*
Opporwunity to expand your knowledge " Individual
responsib'iity " Full utilization of your capabilities .
Association with top-ranking men in field

Citizens Fight
Shopping Area
Eight southeast Ann Arbor
property owners have filed suit in
circuit court to block construction
of a shopping center at Washte-
naw and Stadium Streets.
The suit asks an injunction to
keep the city and the building
department from issuing a permit
for anything other than multiple
dwelling housing, and further
seeks to void a City Council ac-
tion which zonedrthe property for
local b~usiness three years ago.
A hearing on the restraining in-
junction is scheduled for Tuesday.
The City Council failed to pass
an ordinance rezoning the proper-
ty at a meeting two weeks ago,
over the protests of property own-
ers in the area.

"""""" """"

-- __________________ -- - il

ail

I'

Take QUICKIE CHICKIE

CLIP OUT AND MAIL
HANDY CLASSIFIED FORM
I MCHIGAN DAILY
420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.
Please find enclosed $__ for which you are to publish the following
classified ad for three consecutive days. (Use pencil and print each word
clearly.)
II
1 (2 L INES MIN IMUM)I
$2.00
I
1 $2.40
$2.80
______$3.25

to the game
NO 2-9944 for free delivery
Monroe Street Across from the Law Quad

i

"
Openings now in these fields
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING - APPLIED PHYSICS
MATHEMATICS - MECHANICAL, METALLURGICAL,
AERONAUTICAL AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

For that EXOTIC LOOK at the
4 H 0MlF CIMlNGDANCIF

I

I

i

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