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October 19, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-10-19

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M1

IN MICHIGAN DAHM

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1957

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. OCTOBER 19, 19~1

ISITORS FROM JAPAN'
Party Chief Outlines Socialist Aims
By OHN AXE
"The major object of the Jap-
nese Socialist Party is an eco-
Dmically independent and peace-
Ai Japan," Eki Sone, chief of the f
arty's planning bureau said yes-

Musical Society Head
Has Varied Background

Sone, who is the spokesman for
a group of top Socialist Party of-
ficials visiting the University this
ty hoped that the security pact
between Japan and the United
tweer Japan and the United
States and other treaties between
far eastern powers will be re-
placed by a multilateral agree-
ment.
Sone Notes
He noted that trade with the
Ck'inese mainland is extremely
their foreign policy and "to im-
omy, yet that embargoes now
present make trade in this area
very difficult.
*This would all be changed if
such a multilateral agreement
were reached," he continued.
Sone said that the delegation,
headed by Jotaro Kawakami,
chief advisor of the Socialist Par-
ty, has come to this country to
acquaint our government with
heir foreign policy and "to im-
press upon Americans that we
will soon be !n power."
Predicts Control
"At the present time,'' Sone
continued, "we only control one
third of the seats in both houses
of our parliament, but we expect
to be. the majority party by the
time of the next election or at
least the one following."
Returning to policy questions,
Sone said that his party, for the
most part, differed with Japan's
majority party, the, Liberal Dem-
ocrats, on domestic issues.
"We are in favor of natioualiza-
Neveomens
To Honor U'
President Harlan Hatcher an-
nounced yesterday that the Uni-
versity will be honored nationally
by the Newcomen Society of North
America at its annual meeting in
January.
The society, established more
than 30 years ago, centers its in-
terest in material-as distinguish-
ed from political - history, and
includes some 15,000 business, in-
dustrial and civic leaders through-
out the United States.
Newcomen is generally concern-
ed with the development of trans-
portation, industry, communica-
tion, utilities, mining, agriculture,
education and finance..
At the January 9 meeting in New
York, President Hatcher will de-
liver a report on the University
which ,will then be published in
book form by the Princeton Uni-
versity Press.
President Hatcher made his an-
nouncement at the Rlegent's meet-
ing yesterday.

-Daily-Norman Jacobs
UNIVERSITY VISITORS-Leading members of the Japanese
Socialist Party are visiting here this week. Their goal, according
to Eki Sone (far right) is "an economically independent and
peaceful Japan. The group, which also includes (from left) Mrs.
Jotary Kawakami, Jotaro Kawakami, and Morito Morishima, will
confer with American officials next week in Washington.

tion of certain, key industries as
well as a system of social security
benefits for the betterment of
Japan's economy," the visitor
said.
He also emphasized that the
socialists, who were recently com-
bined out of two separate parties,
are opposed to any attempt to
modify the present constitution
which "provides a necessary foun-
dation of democratic govern-
Opposition Favors
"The opposition favors some
changes in the constitution in or-
der to revive some aspects of the
old way of life," Sone added.
When questioned about the
presence of American troops in
Japan, the legislator emphasized
that his party realized the value
of American friendship and mili-
tary aid, but that they thought
the present agreement providing
Lecturer Hurt
In Car Mishap
George R. Anderson of the eco-
nomics department sustained a
fractured left leg and head and
arm injuries in an automobile ac-
cident Monday.
He will be immobilized for at
least three months, according to
an economics department official.
He is a patient at University Hos-
pital.
Anderson was driving a jeep
station wagon at 'he time of the
accident. He collided with a truck
in heavy morning fog on his way
to the University.

for the stationing of our troops
in Japan should be revised and a
termination date added.,
"As it is now," he said, "they
will stay indefinitely, and this
could lead to a gradual building
up of tension between our na-
tions as well as more 'Girard in-
cidents'
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN7
(Continued from Page 4)
lar Research, Development, Design,
Production and Sales.
Signal Engrg. Lab., Fort Monmouth,
N.J. - all levels in Elect., Instr., Mech.,
and B.S. in Mat'ls, E. Physics and Sci-
ence for Research, Development, De-
sign, Equipment Test and Evaluation.
Tues. & Wed., Oct. 22, 23
American Tel & Tel - all levels in
Aero., Constru., Elect., Nuclear, B.S. &
M.S. in Civil, Ind., and Metal, and B.S.
in E. Math., E. Physics and Science for
work with the Long Lines Dept., Bell
Labs., Mich. Bell, Sandia Corp., West-
ern Elect.
Wed., Oct. 23
Commonwealth Associates Inc., Jack-
son, Mich. - B.S. & M.S. in Civil,
Elect., Mech. for Summer and Regular
Consulting and Design.
Line Material Industries, Milwaukee,
Wisconsin - B.S. and M.S. in Elect.
and Mech. for Development and Design.
Socony Mobil Oil Co. New York, New
York - all levels in Ch.E., B.S. in
Mech. and Sci. for Research, Develop-
ment, and Production.
Carter Oil Co., Div of Standard Oil of
N.J. - all levelsin Ch.E., Elect., Mech.,
and M.S. & PhD in Civil & E. Mech.
for Research and Development,
Wed. & Thurs., Oct. 23 &24
General Motors Corp., Detroit, Mich.
-all levels in Ch.E., Elect., Mech., E.
Mech., Metal., Nuclear, B.S. & M.S. in
Aeto., Ind., and Instru., B.S. in Civil,
E. Math., E. Physics for Research, De-
velopment, Design, Production, Time
Study, Methods and Tool Design.
U.S. Marine Corps., Detroit, Mich.-
all degrees and fields interested for
Summer and Regular Programs for
Executive Leadership Positions as Ma-
rine Corps. Officers.
For further information contact the
Engrg. Placement Office, 347 W.E., ext.
2182.
Personnel Requests:
Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, Michigan,
has need of an Accountant.
Lusk Co., Tucson, Ariz., is looking
for Architects with some experience in
housing design.
Ohio Boxboard Co., Rittman, Ohio, is
interested in finding a college gradu-
ate with a few years of experience in
Public Relations work. Could be a man
with a combination of interests in
Journalism and Public Relations. Man
would edit the employee publications,
assist the public relations director, and
help in the administration of employee
activities.
Mich. State Civil Service announces
exams for Officer Manager 1, 11, and
11A, and for Cartographic Draftsman 1.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admn.
Bldg., ext. 3371.

"To maintain the University
Musical Society as a grand insti-
tution within an insitution" is one
of the main objectives of Gail
Rector, '40SM, the Society's new
executive director.
As a 1940 graduate of the Uni-
versity music school, Rector has
long been associated with music
in Ann Arbor,
During his educational career
Rector participated in the Choral
Union, Thor Johnson's "Little
Symphony" and the University
orchestra and Symphonic Band.
At one time he gave bassoon les-
sons here.
As a past member of the Mich-
igan Marching Band, Rector re-
calls "fond memories as I sit as
a spectator in the University sta-
dium." He played the glockenspiel
with the Band.
Musical Background
Following graduation Rector
spent a short interim in the serv-
ice, returning to the University in
1945 to pursue the business side
of music. During this time he be-
came associated with the Univer-
sity Musical Society as assistant
to Charles A. Sink, president of
the Society's Board of Trustees.
In 1954 Rector left the Society
to become assistant manager of
the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
During his three years with the
orchestra he toured Europe as well
as many cities throughout the
country.
While on these tours, Rector
often had an opportunity to hear
and meet many other artists
which he says, "was good back-
ground for his present job" He
found it "an unique experience to
bok the Boston Symphony's ap-
pearance in Aim Arbor ths week,
and then to receive it on the
other hand."
Return to Ann Arbor
Last spring Rector returned to
Ann Arbor with his family to as-
sume his new post. "Ann Arbor
is truly a cultural center," he
commented. "The atmosphere is
right and the pecpe enjoy good
music."
A native of Nebraska, Rector
has been interested in music, par-
Regents Honor
Assistant Dean
With Memoir
University Regents adopted a
memoir yesterday expressing their
sorrow over the death of Prof.
Wayne L. Whitaker, assistant dean
of the Medic~al School.
Prof. Whitaker died Sept. 29 of
cancer.
The memoir reads in part, "His
authoritative judgement in the
area of evaluating candidates for
the study of medicine was sought
by such bodies as the Association
of American Medical Colleges. His
laugh cheered his students and
often cleared their troubles.
"The Regents of the University
of Michigan join in the- sorrow
which Professor Whitaker's death
has brought to his many colleagues
and friends and express deepest
sympathy to his family in their
bereavement.".
Before his death, Prof. Whitaker
volunteered himself for cancer re-
search and he kept records of the
disease as it affected him.
Regents Approve
University Budget
A $1,078,316 budget for instruc-
tional programs, research grants
and contracts has been officially
approved by University Regents.
The budget was directed main-
ly towards research projects, with
$1,072,816 going for this purpose.
The remaining sum, $5,500, was

for support of instructional pro-
grams.

Refund Due
Fraternities
Says FBA
Fraternity Buyers Association
will refund a total of $2,906 to its
42 members according to business
manager Don Reeves, '59E.
The refund represents service
charges in excess of expenses for
the fiscal year ending June, 1957.
The amount of business each in-
dividual fraternity has transacted
with the FBA will determine the
amount of refund, Reeves said.
"We hope to have the refund
ready by the next Stewards Coun-
cil meeting Nov. 13," Reeves con-
cluded.

Federal Service Entrance Ex-
aminations have been announced
by the Civil Service Commission.
For the first time this year, the
examinations for government jobs
have been opened to college
juniors in addition to seniors,
graduates and others of equiva-
lent experience.
The first exam of the year will
be given on Nov., 16, 1957. Appli-
cations for this exam must be in
by Oct. 31, 1957. Application
blanks and further information
about the jobs offered are avail-
able in the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Administration Bldg.
Scheduled to be given approxi-
mately every month for the rest

Cil Service Commission
Sets Entrance Examination

fl 'I

GAIL RECTOR
. heads Music Society

Come

ticularly thebusiness side, "as
long as I can remember." His\
young son, who plays bassoon, is
following in his father's footsteps.
His two daughters are still a little
young to show an active interest
in the field.
During the Socicty's 75th year.
Rector compiled a book listing ev-
ery musical performance given at
the University up to that time. He
topes the Society wal bs able to
i.ibisb a supplement in the fu-
ture.

to Church
inclriv

2v

#;

K. \../-L -L N%.L \..L .1

:

of the year, the examinations are
designed to help the government
in its competition for talented
college people. If the examination
is passed by the applicant, he may
be offered a job after graduation.
Salaries ranging from $3,670 to
$4,525 are available to the suc-
cessful applicant-in his first year
of. governmental work. Positions
in most governmental depart-
ments and agencies are available.
In addition, many agencies of-
fer specially planned programs
designed to develop persons with
unusual promise as future admin-
istrators.

1

4

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, Minister
Mrs. Beth Mahone, Assistant Student
Counsellor

N

Organization
Notices.

-

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
8:30 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. Morning
Services.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
Wednesday-7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!,

Worship

II

9:45 Student class will discuss, "The Christian
Concept of Sin."
1 1:00 Morning worship.
5:00 Roger Williams Fellowship Cabinet Meet-
ing.
6:00 Snack and Fellowship period.
6:45 Discussion on "What Think Ye of Christ"
led by Miss Barbara Foster.

I

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(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficially recognized and registered stu-
dent organizations only.)
Undergradpate Mathematics Club,
meeting, Oct. 21, 7:00 p.m., 3201 An-
gell Hall. Speaker: Prof. A. Shields.
Unitarian Student Group, Oct. 20,
7:00 p.m., First Unitarian Church.
Speaker: Dr. Cutler, "Psycho-Philo-
sophic" approach of Fromm.
Intercooperative Council, Co-op
Alumni should call Robert Farmer to
make reservations for the Co-op Alum-
ni Luncheon at :Mark VIII, Oct. 19, 12-
1:30 p.m.
* . .*
Intercooperative Council, Football
Open House for Co-op alumni and
friends, Oct. 19, 4-6 p.m., Owen Co-op
House, 1017 Oakland.
* * *
Student Zionist Organization, meet-
ing and elections, Oct. 20, 7:00 p.m.,
Hillel. Speaker: Karlman Benjamini of
Jerusalem, "Education of the Immi-
grant Children in Israel."
Graduate Outing Club, hiking and
supper, Oct. 20, 1:30 p.m., meet in back
of Rackham.
* * *
Newman Club., Homecoming Din-
ner, Oct.19, 5:30 p.m., Newman Club,
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture, Oct. 20, 4:00 p.m., Lane Hall.
Speaker: Prof. C. P. Martin, Dept. of
Anatomy, McGill U., "What Is God's
Standard for Man?"
* * *
Congregational Disciples Guild, dis-
cussion of Meaningful Church Sym-
bols, Oct. 19, 1:00 p.m., Congregational
Church.
"Whenever the world de-
clineth in virtue and right-
eousness and vice and injus-
tice mount the thrown, then
come I, the Lord, and revisit
My world.. . and by My in-
fluence and, teachings do I
destroy the evil and injustice
and re-establish virtue. . .
Many times have I thus ap-
peared. Many times hereafter
shall I come again."
Krishna--Hindu Scriptures
BA HA -
WORLD FAITH
1400 Granger NO 8-9085

BUTTON-DOWN WINSOCKI!

CHRISTIAN DEFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 Sunday Schools. University Bible'Closs with
Prof. G. Van Wylen as its teacher.
10:30 Worship Service. "The Great Biblical Truths
of The Reformation. IIl The Priesthood of The
Believer."
7:00 Worship Service. "Jesus Is The Christ."
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT CENTER
at the FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Rev. William S. Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and
12:00, Rev. Henry Kuizenga, Minister of the
Church.
Seminar-"The Significance of the Church" at
10:30.
Coffee break from 11:30 to 12:00.
Sunday supper at 5:45 P.M. (50c).
WSF Forum: "Being Religiously Involved in In-
dustry," 7:00 P.M., Sunday.
Wednesday: Mid-week Vespers at 5:10 p.m., pre-
ceded by coffee break.
Thursday: Bible Study of Hosea, 4:15 P.M., at
the League.
Friday: Leave for Retreat at Cedar Lake..Theme:
"Are You Involved?" Phone for reservations.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat,
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Adult Group. Prof. Albert McQueen,
Eastern Michigan College, "Humanist Elements
in a Liberal Religion."
1 1 :00 A.M. Services-Rev. Edward H. Redman
preaching on: "The Joining of Two Liberal
Denominations."
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Dr. Richard
Cutler on: "Erich Fromm and the Problem of
Conformity."
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon fol-
lowed by breakfast and discussion in Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A.ty. Morning prayer and sermon.
4:00 P.M. Graduate Canterbury.
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong in Chapel.
6:00 P.M. Canterbury buffet supper,,
7:00 P.M. Speaker: Prof. Marvin Eisenberg,
Fine Arts Dept., University of Michigan. Topic:
"The Changes in an Artist as He Grows Old."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
e' B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
SUNDAY
9:30-10:30 Discussion Group, "Basic Christian
Beliefs."
9:00 and 11:00 Sermon by Dr. Merril R. Abbey:
"Christians in a Divided World."
5:30 Fellowship Supper.
7:00 Talk, "Christian's Responsibility Amid Con-
fused Thinking" by Dr. Ross McLennan.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Saturday at 11:30: Buffet Luncheon for Alumni.
Saturday, 4:15 to 5:45: Open House after the
Game.
Sunday, 9:15 and 10:45: Worship Services, with
sermon by the pastor, "After. You Marry."~
(Communion in both services)
Sunday, 9:15 and 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00:' Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Talk, "The Life of
the Christian Church," by Vicar Ron John-
stone.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPS'
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor.
Sunday-9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship Service
and Holy Communion.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Lutheran World Federation --
Miss Esther Barnhart and Pastor Yoder.
Tuesday-7:15 P.M. Influence of Classical Cul-
tures on Christendom-Dr. Bruno Meinecke.
Thursday-9:30 P.M. Vespers.
Friday-7:30 P.M. Meet at Center for Square
Dance.
"CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.

4,

, .,

College students love shirts
with button-down collars, but
we've never known exactly
why. So Van Heusen's research
department asked around and
got the following answers.
L.B. Senior at Mass. Insti-
tute of Entomology. "The but-
tons keep things from crawling
under your collar. Or, if things
do crawl under your collar,
the buttons prevent them from
crawling out again."
Ds.D.E. Freshman at Hora-
6o Alger Tech. "You get more
buttons so I figure the shirt is
more valuable. Is it?"
B.P. Junior at the Pate
School of Tonsorial Arts.
"They're cooler! Wisps of air
blow through the little hole
in the button and keep my
clavicle at a refreshing tem-
perature.
P.S. Senior of Makemoney's
Correspondence School. "I'm a
neurotic. With Button-down

shirts I can wear one side but-,
toned and the other side un-
buttoned, thereby giving the
effect of wearing two types of
shirt at one time. Oh help me,
help me!"
Z.J. Graduate student at
the T.S. Swinburne School of
Beautiful Experiences. "But-
tons remind me of pearls. Pearls
remind me of oysters. Oysters
remind me of indigestion. Indi-
gestion reminds me of my doc-
tor. My doctor reminds me of
his nurse. She's gorgeous. Gor-
geous! So the more buttons
the better."'"
Yes, there's agreement that
button-down collars are the
thing. And there's further
agreement that Van Heusen
is the king of Button-down
stylists. Just take a look at
Van Heusen Oxfordians next
time you're in the market for
shirts. You'll see immediately
why they're famous. $5.00.

'I

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THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
L. C. Utley, Minister.
Television: Sundays, 2:30 P.M, Channel 6, Lan-
sing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M., WXYZ 1270.
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor.
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
9:45 A.M. Student Guild Coffee and Study Hour.
10:45 ,A.M. Worship Service. Topic, "How Can
We Overcome Irritability and Depression" by
Rev. Press.
7:00 Student Guild.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
The Church School and Junior Church meet at
10:45 A.M.
Public Worship-10:45 a.m. Sermon on "When
Fate Overwhelms You" by Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
Service by Rev. J. Edgar Edwards, Campus
Minister.
Student Guild, Mayflower Room, 7:00 P.M. Dis-
cussion "Meaningful Christian Symbols."
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses:,8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in the Father Richard Center.

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MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)

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