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September 16, 1957 - Image 12

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-16

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CHIGAN DAILY

MONDAY. EP

OGRAMS PLANNED:
Five Clubs Provide PoliticalActivity

Co-Op Housing Offers Economic Living,
Democratic Principles, Reduced Costs

Both Young Republicans and
Young Democrats plan to stage
several debates and discussions
during the fall, a number of which
will be sponsored by the Political
Issues club, according to its presi-
der'. Sonia Baur, '60. She said
too, that other groups, including
the International Center, will be
invited to attend these discussions
which the club hopes will encour-
age political interest among stu-
dents, even though no major
elections are upcoming.
Film Scheduled
Miss Baur also said that the
club, which is in its second year
on campus, will sponsor a film dur-
ing the first weeks of school to
raise money for its coming activi-
ties.
The Student Association for In-
tercultural Living, another new
organization, will work toward
closer social and intellectual re-
lationships between students of
different races, religions, and na-
tionalities through dinners, lec-
tures, social hours, and films this
tall and winter, it was revealed by
the group's faculty adyisor, Don-
ald C. Pelz.
The club feels that only through
closer intercultural relations be-
tween .hose of differing racial, re-
ligious, and national backgrounds
can students achieve a truly broad
education, as well as better under-
stanc' of the viewpoints and
feelings of those with differing
interests
Tne final political organization
on campus, the NAACP, will prob-
ably not take an active partisan
stand with either major party, but
will work.mainly for better inter-
raeia} relations probably in close
cooperation with the Student As-
sociation for Intercultural Rela-
tions and with any other groups,
according to the club's president,
Lavern Crump, '58.

By BART HUTHWAITE
Co-operative housing is an ex-
periment in democracy.
The experiment has proven a
highly successfull one for the 235
students presently living in eight
cooperative housing units on cam-
pus.
Every house is operated on a
democratic basis. Each member
is expt oted to fulfill a cert'in
number of hours each week. Cook-
ing, washing dishes and cleaning
house are but a few of the ways
in which he can fulfill his obliga-
tion.
Manager Elected
A house manager is elected to
run the affairs of the house. His
job is to assign work tasks and
handle the purchasing of the food.
The number of hours each in-
dividual works depends upon how
many members are in the house
and what jobs have to be done.
In this way, expenses are kept
to a bare minimum. Food is pur-
chased wholesale and all repairs
on the house are made by the
members.
This cooperation keeps the cost
of living per student down to ap-
proximately $250 a semester for
room and board. Other students
desiring only meals work fewer
hours and pay only $150 a semes-
ter.
Arrangements Individual
Room arrangements are left en-
tirely up to the students. Any im-
provements that are made do not
have to be checked with the rest
of the house.
Members choose their own
roommates and decide among
themselves what the arrange-
ments are going to be.
No restriction is placed on who
can live in a co-op house. Any
student may apply for admission
by filing an application in the In-
tercooperative Council offices on
the second floor of the Student
Activities Building.'
The prospective member has
his choice of what house he would
like to be in.
When a vacancy occurs in the
house of his choice, the student
signs a contract, states when he
can fulfill his work obligation and

-aily--Richard Bloss
CO-OP HOUSE-Living quarters like this one are available to
students at inexpensive costs as part of the cooperative plan.

' Saltl. 1

chooses his room. He is then a
formal member of the house.
ICC 'Watches'
The Intercooperative Council
acts as a "watch dog control" over
the co-op houses.
"We buy new houses, purchase
large quantities of.- food whole-
sale and try to find ways to im-
prove the cooperative movement,"
Bill Armstrong, Grad., president
of ICC, says.
"We have many nationalities

represented in the cooperative sys-
tem. Over a third are foreign stu-
dents. A great many are in pro-
fessional fields," Armstrong said.
Presently there are four coop-
erative houses for women, five for
men and one for married couples.
"We have just completed a new
house, Mark VIII, for graduate
women," Armstrong added. The
ICC prime concern is the better-
ment of living conditions for stu-
dents with as little expense as
possible.

for

SOMETHING?

DO YOU WANT

n Advertising

or news-

TO WORK for the best daily college newspaper in

YOU'VE
Probably wondered
what the
STUDENT CO-OPS
are all about .. .
At Michigan there are three men's, three women's, and one married couples' cooperatives
which house about two hundred students. Here are a few facts on how the co-ops wor.
WHO OWNS AND RUNS THE CO-OPS? WE DO.
Co-ops are owned by the Inter-Cooperative Council (I.C.C.), a corporation set up and
run entirely by the students who live or eat in the houses. Each member, new or old, has one
vote, and shares equally in all decisions: what to eat, how much to spend, how much to work.
WHO MAY JOIN THE CO-OPS? ANYBODY.
Anybody who agrees to participate in running the co-ops democratically is welcome.
Members are accepted on a first come first'served basis without racial, social, religious or
political discrimination. There is no pledge or initiation period.
WHAT ARE THE LIVING AND EATING" ARRANGEMENTS?
As a roomer, you are provided with a bed, closet space, desk, chairs, shelves, storage space
as well as the social space and eating privileges.
As a boarder,' you get twenty meals a week, planned and prepared by, you and your
fellow co-opers.
"Guffing," our traditional between-meal snacking, is one of our most cherished Arivileges.
Everyone has free access at all times to milk, bread, butter and jam, fresh fruit, cereal and
leftovers. Eggs and some other items are charged at cost.
Any member may invite guests. There are adequate laundry facilities. Co-ops stay open
during vacation periods and in the summer.
HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?
Each house sets its own budget. Average costs for the past semester have been:
approx. per week approx. per semester
For room and board $13.75 $206.25
For board only $ 8.75 $131.25
New members pay a $20 deposit when they join; it is refunded when they leave. There are no
other dues of any kind.
WHO DOES THE WORK? WE DO.
All the cooking, dishwashing, maintenance and management is done by the members; each
choosing the job he or she feels best fitted for. Any member, new or old, can be elected officer:
president, house manager, food purchaser, bookkeeper . .
It takes from four to five hours per member torun a co-op. The exact work time
is decided by vote of the house.
There are no maids, janitors, resident advisors or other paid emnployese.

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TO HAVE fun and meet interesting, scintillating

TO WORK on a campus activity which requires no

'

THEN JOIN

Lw6

~Iadli

'I~

BUSINESS or EDITORIAL STAFFS
Attend one of these meetings:
DI I k Ir t " ' AI I - * . ft *. A u r- -*- I . . -- e

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