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September 16, 1957 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-16

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THE MCHIGAN DAILY

It)

SAGE !

THE MICHJGN BATTY AGE

r

JC Powers Still'
ibject to Review

FRESHMEN ELIGIBLE:
Many Scholarships Available at 'U'

through petitioning, to any person
on campus.
Council members serve as com-
mittee supervisors.
The committee members com-
prise what is called the SGC ad-
ministrative wing. Four major
groups are the Education and So-
cial Welfare, National and Inter-.
national Affairs, Calendaring and
Studrit Activities Committees.
The Education and Social Wel-
fare Committee studies areas re-
lated to academic aspects of the
University. The group has studied
such things as honor systems,
which is now in special University
committee upon SGC's recom-
mendation, and counseling, which
also upon SGC request is now
being studied by a University
committee.
NIA's Work
The National and International
Affairs Committee works with the
'National Student Association, im-
proves relations with other schools,
ano helps with foreign student
problems at the University.
The C ale n dar in g Committee
works out all problems of pro-
gramming the year's events.
The student activities committee
takes care of special Council pro-
jects. For instance, this year it
looked into the possibilities of a
student bookstore. It also super-
vises petitioning and nominations
for SOC's semi-autonomous.
boards.
These are the Human Relations
Board. the Cinema Guild Board,,
Joint Judiciary Council, Student
Book Exchange and Student Ac-
tivities Building Administrative
Board.
Other Boards
The Human Relations Board is
made up of students and business-
men from Ann Arbor The group
works secretly in areas of dis-i
crimination in both the city and
the University.
The Cinema Guild Board is re-
sponsible for bringing special films
into Ann Arbor and allocating the
profits to various campus organi-
zations.
The new Student Activities
Building is run by the SAB Ad-
ministrative Board.
SGC is financed by a 25-cent
tax on each, student, taken from
tuition.
Its four officers, president, exec-
utive vice-president, administra-
tive vice-president and treasurer,
are elected by the entire council,
although the officers themselves
cannot be ex-officio members.
The Council's secretarial work is
done by Ruth Callahan of the
Dean of Men's Office.

By RONALD KOTULAK
Scholarships ranging from $10
to $3,000 in value are available to
freshman students after they have
completed one to two semesters of
work at the University.
These scholarships are awarded
on the basis of a student's aca-
demic record at college and have
no connection with his high school
standing.
Ivan W. Parker, assistant dean
of men, advises students interested
in seeking scholarship aid to apply
for the grants in February. This
will give his office time to process
the requests and it will insure the
"proper consideration" of each
application.
Applications Obtainable
Scholarship applications can be
cbtained at the Scholarship 'Divi-
sion of the Office of Student Af-
fairs in the Student Activities
Building.
Students interested in receiving
scholarships in line with their field
of concentration should consult

the dean of the school or college
where they plan to concentrate. In
addition, Parker recommends that
students fill out application forms
at his office in order to be eligible
for other general scholarships.
The University awards scholar-
ships on the basis of one or all of
the following criteria: (a) scholas-
tic ability, (b) character, and (c)
financial need.
Requirements Differ
There are three classes of
scholarships at the University,
each of which specifies different
requirements.
The first is the general scholar-
ships open to anyone on campus
no matter what his field of con-
centration is. This is the largest
grouping, and, last February, 70
students won awards.
In the second group are listed
special scholarships which are
given by outside agencies such as
corporate groups or federations.
These awards are based on geo-

graphic or area of study consider-
ations.
The third class of scholarships
centers around special grants
awarded by the deans of the vari-
ous schools and colleges. Only
concentrates of a particular school
or college are eligible for these
awards.
Aid Received
During the 1956-57 school year
more than 4,000 students received
aid in the form of scholarships.
The total amount of money spent
in this way ran over $1 million.
The average scholarship came to
$225.
One of the most unusual schol-
arships available at the University
is the American Indian grant.
This scholarship was established
in 1932 by the Board of Regents in
recognition of three sections of
land granted to the newly founded
University in 1817 by Indian tribe's
living in the area of old Fort
Meigs.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCILr-An SGC member's day is crowded with problems and ques-
tions that require working late at night, even though the solutions aren't always to be found.
Council A chievements for Year Many;
Pro Tess in Honors Sems Lecturs
(Continued from Page 1)

Meigs.

HEADQUARTERS 'for

the University lecture course and
has the power to disapprove any
lecturers brought to campus by
different 'organizations, if they
use University facilities.
Students Vote
In accordance with two Council
recommendations, students now
have votes on this committee and
the tenure of its faculty members
has been limited.
University students will have an
opportunity this year to take out
an health insurance policy
through the University. An SGC
committee has been working out
possible policies and bargaining
with insurance companies, so that
students will be able to take out
health insurance at special rates.
The Council has also set up a
committee to begin work on a
special forum program. The pro-
gram would include speakers who
would discuss academic problems
as well as controversial subjects in
religion, politics and academics.-
Chest Begun
This October students will pro-
bably be asked to contribute to the
Campus Chest. It will be the sec-
ond all-campus "give-once-for-all"
charity drive. This past year, the
Council held their first such drive,
in prder to prevent a great many
charity drives throughout the
course of*the school year.

It also was forced to deny Ga-
lens, a medical honorary, the right
to hold a charity drive on campus
because it interfered with the
united fund concept.
Ideas to Come
The University has been grow-
ing at a great rate, and the Coun-
cil feeling concern about this, has
set up a committee composed of
students, faculty and administra-
tion to study the problems caused
by increasing enrollments.
The group will try to make sug-

gestions on how these problems
may be overcome.
Freshman women who wish to
join sororities will have their op-
portunity in the spring this year.
Rushing for sororities has been
traditionally held in the fall. How-
ever, the Council felt it would be
better to rush in the spring after
the women had a chance to be-
come adjusted.
This past year, SGC helped the
Panhellenic Association work out
a calendar for this spring rushing
program.

STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
OFFICE FURNITURE, TYPEWRITERS and FOUNTAIN PENS

Smith-Corona
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable
ALL MAKES, bought, sold,
rented, repaired.
Terms: We try to suit customer

"rte / .

FOUNTAIN PENS all makes

C

Typewriter Repair Work a Specialty
STUDENT SUPPLIES.

Sales & service by
factory trained men.

SING

ACT

DANCE

ORGANIZATIONf MEETING
for
Gilbert and Sullivan's
"Trial by Jury" and "Sorcerer"

Stationery.
Study Lamps
Note Books
Fountain Pens
Loose Leaf Note Books
Greeting Cards
Typewriter Supplies
Since
1908 M

SPECIAL
ON SURPLUS
3 ring heavy,
block note books
1 " ring 97c

CHAIRS

DESKS

FILES

ORRILL'S

Phone
NO 3-2481

314 South State St.

September 19, 7:00 P.M.

Michigan League

The Typewriter, Office Furniture and Stationery Store.

I _ _______________________

1 /Yrr M i lll ll
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* CALENDARING OF EVENTS
* M-HANDBOOK
0 CINEMA GUILD

* HOME of the
Student .Government Council,

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