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September 22, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'U' Analyzes Presidential Campaigns

a To Collect Fungi

Newer teopie Ieceive Ji
This Year, Agency Revea

HUTHWAITE
found practically
people will jour-
aska to study the
1 will brave giant
eflies and invis-
collect specimens.
9 did both this

boat and
companied
he natural
5 quest of

glaciers
g t
Is
tg tree

Widespread belief that the
Democratic Party stood for the less
advantaged economic classes4 was
by far the most powerful force off-
setting the personal popularity of
President Dwight D. Eisenhower in
the presidential elections of 1952
and 1956, Donald Stokes told the
American Political Science Associ-
ation yesterday in NeW York City.
Stokes, who is connected with
the University Survey Research
Center told the group that several
major voting trends have appeared
from the study of the voter atti-
tudes in these elections.
The foremost of these trends
seemed to rest with the continued
popularity of the president in both
elections and the holdover of good
feeling toward the 'democrats as
the party who had befriended the
lower classes and rescued them
from the depression.
Party of Peace'
Also notable in the study, Stokes
reported, was the fact that the
Republicans were credited as be-
ing the "party of peace," even
more in 1956 than in 1952, while
the "Democrats' position along this
line was noticably weakened by
the lack of association between
their candidate, Stevenson, and
experience about and of foreign
affairs.
He said that throughout Eisen-
hower's first term, the Republicans
preserved a general advantage in
foreign affairs and managed to
cultivate further the public im-
pression that they and not the

Democrats were best guarantors of3
peace.
"But on the other hand," noted
the researcher whose work was
made possible by grants from the
Rockefeller Foundation and Car-
negie Corporation, "there was still
wide approval for domestic policies
linked with New Deal during the
1952 contest."
Changes in Trends
Many changes in trends evident
evident between the elections, he
continued, with some working to
the advantage of each party.
"If the Democrats kept their
good name as friends of the less
advantaged, they lost altogether
their reputation as the party of
good times," Stokes said. He added
that support for the Democratic
Party as sponsor of the New and
Fair Deals diminished with will-
ingness of the Eisenhower Admin-
istration to accept basic reforms
of the previous administrations.
On the Republican side, he 'noted
that charges of corruption in the
Democratic Party, while quite ef-
fective in 1952 had seemed to have
lost force as an element of Repub-
lican strength.
He added, however, that com-
ment about Democratic misdeeds
were still much more in evidence
than were charges that the GOP
had become corrupt during its four
years in office.
Farm Policy Important
Returning to those issues which
did not fade in importance over
this same period, Stokes called

Democratic farm policy "even more
potent in 1956 than in 1952."
In concluding his remarks he
added "We may indeed wonder
what will happen to the Republi-
cans when the Eisenhower appeal,
dies or likewise to the Democrats
when their most solid group ap-
peal which seems so largely rooted
in the past fades from memory."

SENIORSy..o.
Keep your appointments for, your
SENIOR PICTURES

The number of Washtenaw
County welfare, cases has dimin-
ished slightly in the year ended
Aug. 31, the County Social Wel-
fare Department announced yes-
terday.
There were 243 families and in-
dividuals receiving direct relief at

the end of August comp
254 cases one year be
department said. In J
were 242 cases.
The county paid $20,27
funds in August, comp
$16,904 in July and $
August one year before.

test

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
420 MAYNARD STREET

smiled
e spent
prayed
lant to
horse-
e .next
I beds
horse-
;quar-

If you haven't made one yet, make one NOW
between 3-5 P.M. daily

FUNGUS COLLECTOR-Dick Gates, '59, takes a sample of. a'
fungus which causes diseases in trees. Gates spent' a month In
Alaska this summer with Prof. Dow Baxter of the natural

NEW SHIPMENTS of

resources school to collect fungi for a
forests.

study of diseases in virgin

ouple. "I got
after a while.
iem crawl ov-
is than to try
n a' while, I'd
iy ears when
)ad," contin-
er's 19th trip
tcamera 'fan,
rf film on the
essor decided
ave some pic-
ning. He ask-
upstream and
sere he could
rates said.
er slime co;-
g a few times,

possible to predict the occurrence
of disease at different periods in
the development of the forest.
The duo male the greater part
of the trip on horseback. Garbed
in wool shirts, khakis and hiking
boots, they ventured to the remote
forests to carry out their study.
Commenting on the expedition,
Gates said, "It was one of the
most interesting experiences in
my life even takin~g into account
the bugs, water and sore feet.
"I'd like to go back some day,"
the part-time assistant fungi col-
lector concluded.
Student Tells
Of Bullet Hole

t i "!
I
U
} " 7
..

KOSH ER'HOTDOGS
H amburgers, Fried Chicken, Fried Shrimp

t :
_,s
''
':5

USED

arriving daily

I

NEW BOOKS IF YOU PREFER
For that hard-to-find textbook

TEXTB

try

Gary Kane, '58BAd, told Ann
water and Arbor police Friday that he owned
e had got the car on which a bullet hole was
at he said found the day before.
e over. Ho' The 1950 cat had been parked
He wasn't in a lot on Division St. some two
I did," he days. Kane said a friend of his
pushed the car there after it broke
it of a co- down while he was using it.
John Mid- Kane told police that the bullet,
Riverside still present, entered the left door
Pathology, of thecar while he was shooting
and Prof. rats near his home in Illinois,
Kane told officers a knifedstuck
e' study of into the inside of a door had been
in virgin placed there during a fishing trip
would be some time ago.

E

1

MILK MflID DRIVE-IN
3730 WASHTENAW AVENUE
OPEN Mon.-Thurs. to 1:00 AM. -Fri.-Sun. to 2:00 A.M

.,
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;,,
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s
<
. ;s
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<r

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322 South

State Street

Bob Graham,

r~i1YA 1 ''A..."10

C'. .. 4' ~ '(N

MO N.,~

0

E

FRE D

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