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May 21, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WED

)"ESDAY, ZAZ 21, 195

U' LUTHERAN PASTOR SAYS:
Students Show Serious Interest

DITOR'S NOTE: This is the tenth
. series of articles dealing with
history and activities of campus
ions groups.)
By KATHLEEN MOORE
e congregation of the Luther-
Student Chapel consists of
bers of eight Lutheran
Les" belonging to the National
eran Council.
theran university and college
nts in institutions in the
d States and Canada belong
e Lutheran Student Associa-
-perhaps the largest auton-
is student religidus group in
'ica, the Rev. Dr. Henry 0.
r said. He is pastor for Uni-0
y students who attend. the
)el.
e Lutheran Student Associa-
was originated by the Na-
I Lutheran Council in 1922 to
;ter to the needs of the uni-,
;ies, "not only to the students,.
o the faculty and administra-
as well, Dr. Yoder said.
Group Governs Self.
hough the Lutheran' Student
)ation represents the Na-
,1 Lutheran Council, it is a
letely independent group. The
iation is governed, entirely
udents elected regionally and
nally. This council of student.
rs determines the policy, pro-
s and finances of the student
dzation.
jutheranstudent program was
i on this campus in 1917, five
before the Lutheran Student
ation came into existence.
1945, the student group was
ected with the Zion Lutheran
ch' and Trinity Lutheran
ch. In that year, the group
I into a house on the land
occupied by the Lutheran,
nt Chapel and Dr. Yoder be-
the first full time pastor for

JC Carnival
To Be Held-
On City Site
The City Council granted per-
mission to the Ann Arbor Junior
Chamber of Commerce to hold a
carnival "similar to Michigras" in
Veteran's Park.
After a half-hour of debate, the
approval for the petition was given
the Junior Chamber: of Commerce
to sponsor its annual carnival on
city property.
Councilman C. W. Joiner argued
against the petition, as he had
done last year on the grounds that
affirmation would constitute a
breech of the city ordinance pro-
hibiting the operation of any
"game of chance" on city property.
The Junior Chamber of Com-
merce, represented by Joseph
Frick, maintained that contests of
skill must not be mistaken for
games of chance. He pointed out
that prizes are awarded to suc-
cessful competitors and that the
fair renders the community and
its children a valuable service.
Joiner said that the awarded
prizes are frequently, inferior to
the price the participant must pay
for entertaing the- contests. Capt.
Rolland J. Gainsley of the Ann
Arbor Police Department said that
due to the recently planted grass
in the proposed carnival area con-
gested traffic might causew serious
damage to the park.
Frick replied that a similar
traffic situation has arisen during
the -past few years and that serious
damage has always been averted
by 'efficient police supervision.
The role call following the de-
bate resulted in approval by the
city council.

MIDWESTERN CONFERENCE:
Student Composers Plan Forum at 'U'
The Midwestern Student Com-
posers' Forum will be held at the uled for 10 a.m. Saturday. The songs and opera scenes to w
University Friday through Sun- University of Illinois will play at quintets and string ensemles.
day. 1:30 p.m. Saturday and the State Through the chamber conce
The University, the University University of Iowa will present its the student composer is offe
of Illinois, Northwestern Univer- concert at 4 p.m. the opportunity of hearing
sity and the State University of Opening number for the Univer- work and of discussing - it y
Iowa will each present recitals of sity's concert will be "String Quar- professional composers, teacr
chamber music wirtten and per- tet in D" by Alexander Post, Grad. and other students. The symn
formed by their own student mu- SM. Playing in the number will be sium allows each school to c
sicians. Sheila McKenzie, '58SM and El- pare its own performers and cc
Held annually since 1949, the nore Crampton, '58SM, violin; posers with those from ot
series began at Northwestern Uni- George Papich, Grad. SM, viola; schools.
versity. Students from the School Cynthia Kren, '59SM, cello. All concerts are in Aud. A
of Music travel each May to one "Two Pieces for Piano and Angell Hall and are open to
of the member schools. Michigan Chamber Group" by Bruce Wise, public.
was host four years ago. * Grad., will follow. Wise, as pian-
Josef Blatt will conduct the ist, will be accompanied by a e tO
University Symphony Orchestra chamber group of Richard Harri- f V L0 ee
in presenting a concert at 10:30 son, Grad., Clarinet; Thomas
a.m. Surlday. This will consist of Course, Grad., bass clarinet; Betty
works from all schools. Bird, '58SM, bassoon; David Bates,
The University will present a '58SM, trumpet; Kenneth Mieseri,nr
concert - at 8:30 p.m. Friday. '59SM, trombone; Harold Jones,
Northwestern's concert is sched- '60SM, and Dominick Pellegrino, Five professors from the Sh
'58SM_ n"r'"r"n r '""r"mh"loiior * "* ", +wi

Poet Willard
Wins Honors
Nancy Willard, '58, a winner of
the national Riverside Poetry con-
test, will have works appearing in
an anthology of student verse to
be published late this summer.
Miss Willard is one of 58 stu-
dent poets selected as winners of
the contest sponsored by The
Riverside Church, New York.
Verses of over 500 poets repre-
senting 250 colleges and univer-
sities were judged last summer by
a panel of poets including.Mari
anne Moore, Howard Nemerov and
Alan Swallow.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL-Students, faculty and administrators from the University join
the Rev. Dr. Henry O. Yoder in worship each Sunday. The congregation of the Chapfl is representative
of the eight Lutheran bodies belonging to the National Lutheran Council, parent organization of
tloe National Student Association.

The Chapel, designed by Prof.
alph Hammett of the architec-.
ure and design school, was -co-
leted in 1955. A vestry of eight~
tudents assist Dr. Yoder at the
vo services each Sunday. A grad-
late group and one for Lutheran
aculty members functionInde-
endently of the undergraduate
roup.
Organization Shows Faith
The Lutheran Student Associa-
.on has its own local officers and
ommittees. Dr. Yoder said the
rup is."considered to be the ex-
Ianagement
Fo Hold Talkls
The management education and
ervices program of the Institute
f Labor and Industrial Relations
f the University and Wayne
tate University Will sponsor a
management., conference May. 26
nd 27.
The informal discussion to be
ela at Inglis .House will be on
he topic "Preparing for the 1958:
egotiations." Management rep-
esentatives have been invited to
ttend.
WHEN IN CHICAGO
visit the BLUE NOTE
NOW, PLAYING
Gene Krupa & his Quartet

pression of the faith of the stu-
dent" in Christian social action,
interest in foreign students, in dis-
cussions, and in special interest
groups.
'The national goals of the Lu-
theran Student Association, Dr.
Yoder said, are to "provide the
ministry of the Word and the
o F

Coparison
Prof. Leonard Zamiska of the
architecture college will present a
slide illustrated program entitled
"Painting vs. Photography," at 8'
p.m. "today.
.He will appearat ameeting of
the Ann Arbor Camera Club in
the cafeteria of the Argus Camera
plant. The* program will feature
ways to help make the photog-
rapher aware of the abundant
possibilities of mood, design and
composition in everyday activities.
quintets and string ensembles.
Prof. Zamiska attended the
Cleveland Institute of Art. He has
also served as a designer on the
Cleveland City Planning Commis-
sion, where photography was used
extensively in the Public Infor-
mation Center.
For five years he taught adver-
tisingdesignrat the University of
Illinois. In recent years he has
t r a v e I e d, painted and photo-
graphed extensively in Mexico.
The public is-cordially invited to
attend the lecture according to
the club's officers.

Sacrament" to all students, enable
the students to make an intelligent
and thorough study of the Bible
and to offer courses on such topics
as Christian ethics and basic
Christian teachings.
:Another important aspect of the
student program is discussion.
Problems are viewed from the po-
litical, economical and theological
perspectives, he explained, so that
the student may interpret his faith
in the "light of relevant issues."
Students Intensely Interested
"There is little doubt about the
interest of many students in the-
ology and its relation to other dis-
ciplines," Dr. Yoder said. He said
he believed students looked to the
Church to provide a "serious and
intelligent" approach to ways of.
interpreting Christian faith in
their academic and vocational life.
organization
Notices
Chess Club, meeting, May 21, 7:30
p.m., Union.
I-Hop, mass meeting, May 22, 7:30
p.m., League Ann Arbor Room.

Dr. Yoder is convinced, however,.
that his primary concern is to
minister to the religious needs of
his students. They expect the
Church to supply "that which is
centered in the Word and in the
Sacraments," he continued.
He feels that his most important
work is with students who are pre-
paring for Confirmation. In the
past year, Dr. Yoder has seen 15
students become members of the
Lutheran Church. He spent be-
tween 16 and 18 hours with each
of them before they were Con-
firmed in what he described as
"private instruction."

Sto
TO[

see

3rts
N1G~tF] SpECTPCLEA

DIAL
NO 2-3136

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.< .:->
,< >,,

from
alcorners
Of the
world
Students, faculty
adadministrators
lto the iliam Sloane House,
long famous for its comfortable, in-
expensive accommodations and its
wide spread program of services.
Enjoy clean rooms, coffee shop,
tailor, TV room, sports, forums
and tours. All age groups accom-
modated,
RATES: $2.20 single;
$3-$3.40 double.
Membership included.
Write for Folder C.
WILLIAM SLOANE
HOUSE Y.MC.A.
356 West 34th St. (nr Ninth Ave.)
New York, N. Y. Phone: OXford 5.5133
(One Block From Penn Station)

SPARRING

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NOTE * "SOLOMON'S MINES" at 3 6
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lGET
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July 2-27,

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DMING
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41

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