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May 01, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

JP REPORT RELEASED YESTERDAY:

.ommittee Lists Calendaring Recommendations

tinued from Page 1)

arter system (four terms of 12
eks of academic work).
The present orientation pro-
am consists of the introductory
tegration of new students into
e University community and
e administration of aptitude
id proficiency tests for aid in
unseling.
The Committee recommends
at the present orientation pro-
am be replaced by an advance
ientation program. This ad-
,nce program would be conduct-
during the several months pre-
ding the beginning of each se-
ester.
New students would spend two
tys at the University some time
iring this period.'The week pre-
ding each semester would be
ed to orient those few students
io are unable to come during the
ivance orientation period.
The Committee recommends
.e adoption of the advance on-
tation program as soon as pos-
,le. ..
egistration . *
Registration includes counsel-
g, payment of tuition and place-
ent in class sections. It also in-
ives the developing of a time
hedule in advance of registra-
The Committee recommends
at the present registration pro-
am' be replaced by an advance
gistration program. For new
udents, the registration program
uld-be done in conjunction with
e advance orientation program.
>r former students,' advance
gistration, would he conducted'
fore the final exam period of
ie preceding semester in resi-
The week preceding each se-
ester would be used to register
ose students who are unable to
gister during the advance regis-
ation periods.
The payment of tuition could
deferred until the week before
e beginning of the semester.
tudeits wh leave the University
cause of academic discipline
il have their tuition refunded.
In oder to accomplish an ad-
tee registration program, the
iveloipmnt of a firm time
hedule before the beginning of
e advance registration period is
iessry."
e ommittee recomniends
e adoption of the advance regis-
ation program as soon as pos-
1e.
css Length ...
Semesters or other subdivisions
the academic year should be
dformn in length. Regional ac-
editing agencies, including the
rth eCeitral Association, make
Sspecification as to number of
eks of classes per semester.
Some professional accrediting
encies do make such speifica-
ns and, in some states, laws
vern the minimum number of
sses in education courses.
The Committee recommends
at while Michigan remains on
two semester basis each aca-
mic semester should include 15
eks of classes, exclusive of va-
tions and of the examination
riod. A three semester calendar
ay necessitate ' adjustment of
is principle to the extent of a
o or three day mid-semester

Greater use of our present fa-
cilities can be improved by in-
creasing the number of 3 o'clock
and 4 o'clock sections, by using
the noon hour to a greater extent
other, alternative, by :equiring
for classes and, when there is no
students to take their full share
No recommendation is made by
of Saturday classes.
the Committee at this time since
steps to insure the more efficient
use of rooms in the respective col-
leges are presently adequate.
The general use of the noon
or- the universal scheduling of
Saturday ' classes might require
University-wide adjustments.
1958-59 Calendar
FIRST SEMESTER
Orientation-Mon., Sept. 15
Registration -, Wed., Sept. 17
through Sat., Sept. 20
Classes begin-Mon., Sept. 22
Thanksgiving recess - (eve)'
Wed., Nov. 26 through (a.m.)
Mon., Dec. 1
Christmas recess--(noon) Sat.,
Dec. 20 through (a.m) Mon.,
Jan. 5
Classes end-(eve) Sat., Jan. 17
Study Period-Sun., Jan. 18 -
Exam period -- Mon., Jan. 19
through Thurs., Jan. 29
Midyear graduation--Sat., Jan.
24.
Semester ends-Sat., Jan. 31
SECOND SEMESTER
Orientation-Mon., Feb. 2
Registration - Wed., Feb. 4
through Sat., Feb. 7
Classes begin-Mon., Feb. 9
Spring recess - (noon) Sat.,
March. 28 through (a.m) Mon.,
April 6
Classes end-Wed., May 27
Study perod-Thurs., May 28
Exam period -- Fri., May 29
- through Tues., June 9
Commencement-Sat., June 13
Perhaps.there, should be a Uni-
versity Schedule Committee which
would' have jurisdiction over the
classrooms of the entire Univer-
sity.
Short Session
The so-called "Lame Duck ses-
sion" of classes is considered un-
satisfactory by nany f a c u 1 t y
members and students. The situ-
ation could be improved, A) by
adopting the quarter system, B)
'by 'starting' the semester early
enough (very late August) so that
a full academic semester may be
completed by Christmas or 'C) by
scheduling a longer post-Christ-
mas session. Alternative C could
be used effectively in connection
with an advance registration sys-
tem, a longer pre-Christmas va-
cation and a shorter interval of
time between semesters.

Though the Committee has giv-
en its attention thus far primari-
ly to basic calendar principles
rather than to examination of
specific calendars, it is possible
that the successive adjustments
toward a possible trimester calen-
dar by 1964 might include the
use of alternative C in 1960-1961
and 1961-1962 followed by the use
of alternative B in 1962-1963 and
1963-1964.
Vacations . . .
Educational policy on vacations
reflects adjustment of the aca-
demic program to the traditional
holiday pattern in the community
and the need to interrupt pro-
tracted work periods for rest and
revitalization.
Our traditional vacation pattern
involves Thanksgiving, Christmas
and a Spring vacation. The time
between semesters has developed
into a vacation period for stu-
dents and an interrupted and un-
it is not a community holiday
productive time for faculty, but
period nor does it come after a
protracted period of work.
The Committee recommends
that while Michigan remains on
a two semester calendar the aca-
demic calendar allow for a vaca-
tion on the Thanksgiving week-
end, a minimum two-week Christ-
mas vacation and a minimum
one-week Spring vacation, but
that the period of academic inac-
tivity between semesters be elim-
inated.
"Dead days," being days imme-
diately preceding examinations
when no classes are scheduled, are
desiraple, especially when the ex-
amination periods do not start on
Monday. No change is' recom-
mended for 1958-1959. It is the
present opinion of the committee
that examination periods after
1958-1959, if limited to one week,
should begin on Monday.
-i
Examinations . .
The faculties of several Univer-
sity schools recommend the elim-
ination of formal examination
period. One large school has legis-
lation making the present system
mandatory, but the problem is be-
ing studied by faculty committees.
One professional school recom-
mends that its examination period
continue and be independent of
those of other schools if neces-
sary.
Our studies show that Michigan
has the longest examination
period of the Big Ten schools. Al-
though determination of educa-
tional policy with reference to ex-
aminations must be by faculty ac-
tion, the Committee believes that
the University should work to-

ward an examination period of
one week's duration and that it
should be strongly considered for
inclusion in our present two se-
mester system. It would be a nec-
essary part of any three semester
system.
Grading ..
Many instructors feel that they
are now forced, because of the
short time allowed for grading ex-
aminations, either to give types of
examinations which they do not
prefer or to determine grades
without adequate time for read-
ing the papers.
Obviously, grades must be in
the office of the registrar within
a few days after the examination,
but we feel that in this period of
large class size, some additional
time should be allowed for the
grading of papers.
Such a policy would have im-
plications for other activities of
the calendar. It would be consis-
tent with a commencement with-
out diplomas. It would be consis-
tent with an advance registration
system, but not with the present
one in which college officials take
action on grades prior to registra-
tion for the following semester.
It is our opinion that in the
coming era there will be real com-
petition for the privilege of at-
tending the University and the
responsibility for qualifying as an
enrollee should be borne by the
student. The University should
not be concerned about the lapse
of time if, after the beginning of
a new term, it finds that it must
ask a student to withdraw.

Commencement . .
A Commencement ceremony
entailing definitive diplomas for
all participants who receive de-
grees, if coupled with a require-
ment of conventional final exam-
inations for graduating seniors,
results in a substantial time lag
and wide-spread non-attendance.
The educational significance
and emotional stimulation of the
Commencement pageant would
not seriously be impaired by the
fact that a small number of at-
tendants might not ultimately
qualify for graduation. The com-
mittee recommends that Com-
mencement be held promptly at
the close of the final examination
period even though it might not
be possible to award diplomas to
all groups.
Where any substantial degree
of educational integration exists
between or among different units
of the University, calendar varia-
tions are undesirable. If a parti-
cular unit is largely of complete-
ly self-contained there isno rea-
son to require it to conform to the
calendar of the other units.
'The committee recommends
that units of the University whose
student bodies and educational
programs are not interrelated.
with those of the other units to
any substantial degree, be permit-
ted to adopt their own calendars.
Athletics ..
The intercollegiate athletic pro-
gram is an integral part of the
undergraduate educational pat-,
tern of the University of Michi-
gan. Calendar arrangem ents

which radically modify the tra-
ditional time schedule of this Uni-
versity will have a disruptive im-
pact upon some or all segments
of intercollegiate athletics unless
the institutions with whom we
compete adopt similar calendars.
It is recognized that the inter-
ests of intercollegiate athletics
must be subordinate to impera-
tive academic demands arising
from increased enrollment. If
such developments materialize,
and Michigan turns to a trimester
calendar, intercollegiate athletics
must adjust to the necessities.
The Committee recommends
that calendar modifications be
made only after there is a full ap-
praisal of their effects on inter-
collegiate athletics and that 'we
do not initiate changes which
will make it impracticable to con-
tinue any important phase of the
existing intercollegiate athletic
program. The committee does not
foresee that while Michigan re-
mains on a two semester basis it
See CALENDARING, page 6

ANNOUNCEMENT
Students who wish to become a part of
the new Hillel program mqy pick up
petitions for committee chairmanships
in the secretary's office at Hillel.
Petitions must be returned no later than Friday, May 9
For further information call Robert Stein, President-elect.
Phone NO 5-6928 or NO 3-4129

NOW

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Internallonal Students Association

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Saturday, May 3 . . . 9 P.M.-1 A.M.
UNION BALLROOM

FOREIGN PICTURE
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e

Class attendance in buildings
peripheral to the main campus
raises questions regarding the
length of class periods and the in-
terval between classes. It is the
Committee's recommendation that
at present no change in these time
units be made.
In recent calendars, classes
meeting on Saturday only or on
have not had as manv weeks of
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday
tlasses as, for example, classes]
meeting Monday, Wednesday,
Friday. Every effort should be
made to construct a calendar
which gives the Tuesday, Thurs-
day, Saturday morning sequences
treatment equivalent to the Mon-
day, Wednesday, Friday ones.
More Classes "
Related to the question of the
use of classrooms throughout the
sear is tLe question of a greater
use of the classrooms each week.
Although the Russell Report on
Higher Education in Michigan in-
dicates that the University of
Michigan's relative record in this
report is good, we certainly have
not yet attained the maximum
use.

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Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
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