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May 01, 1958 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-05-01

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SDAY MAY 1,1958 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Michigan

Netters

Host

Detroit

Today

P

I

'M' Opens Home Season
With 45 Straight Wins

Grid Coaches Satisfied
With 'Byers Experiment'

By GARY GUSSIN
Michigan's defending Big Ten
and NCAA tennis champions will
meet the University of Detroit this
afternoon in their first home
match of the season.
The match, a warmup for the
first Conference clash at Ohio
State this Saturday, will start at
2:30 at Ferry Field.
Erickson Leads
The Wolverines, possessors of 45
consecutive dual match victories,
will be led by John Erickson and
John Harris in first and second
singles, respectively. George Korol,
the only other returning member
of last year's squad will be num-
ber three man.
Ordinarily, Bob Sassone, a let-
ter-winner four ,years ago, would
be in the third slot, but an exam
will keep him out of today's match.
Three Veterans
Detroit will also go with their
three veterans in the top positions,
these being brothers George and
Andy Nasser and Captain Don
Milazzo.
Michigan's team will be rounded
out by sophmores Frank Fulton,
Bill Vogt and John Wiley, who will
face the Titans' Jim Drinan, Mike
Gergely and John Jordan.
Last year, the powerful Wolver-
ine netters defeated Detroit over-
Resign
By The Associated Press
Leon Hart, Detroit Lion foot-
ball player, and Alex. Hannum,
coach of the world professonl
basketball champion St. Louis
Hawks, stepped down from their
positions in sports yesterday.
Hart, a three-time All-Amer-
ican at Notre Dame and seven-
year Lion veteran, retired and
accepted a position as a 'color'
announcer for Detroit football,
games.
Hannum's resignation was
the result of a salary dispute.
He stated it would be un-
profitable for him to return.
under his present contract.

whelmingly, 9-0, and they are ex-
pected to at least repeat the vic-
tory in today's encounter.
Michigan Coach Bill Murphy
stated that he had "no idea" how
well the team would do in the
Big Ten this season and felt that
the match with Detroit would not
be an adequate indication of the
team's strength.
Slow Start
The Titans started the season
poorly, losing their first two
matches to Wayne State and Al-
bion, and obivously are not the
caliber of any of the leading Big
Ten teams.
For this reason, one is inclined
to agree with Murphy that the
contest this afternoon will be sig-
nificant as far as the Big Ten is
concerned only if U-D wins.
If this happens, or if the Wol-
verines doi't play well, Murphy
stated that he "would be very dis-
appointed."

JOHN HARRIS JIM BYERS
... leads netters . .. good move

By HAL APPLEBAUM
The "Jim Byers experiment" is
beginning to show promise for
Michigan's football team.
Starting the season with only
fourth-string Jim Dickey back and
no outstanding freshmen, Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan turned to mass
experimentation this spring.
Second string fullback Byers,
end Gordie Morrow and freshmen
guards Bob Wojcik, Tom Jobson
and Dick Syring all were shifted
to center in an effort to plug the
gap.
Byers quickly moved up to the
number one position 'after learn-
ing the techniques.
Oosterbaan commented on
Byers' play: "We are quite con-
fident that he can do the job and
be the number one center when
September rolls around. He will
be at linebacker on defense just
as he was when he played fullback,
and he has no problems handling
this chore. It's mainly a problem
of getting him acclimated to of-
fense in the line. His blocking has
always been good, so we are ex-
pecting him to come through in
fine shape."
Byers commented on the change,
saying, "Center sure is different
than fullback. Once I get ac-
customed to offense I should be
alright, though. The hardest thing
to get used to is the long snap on
the single wing plays and on punts.
Having to keep my head down un-
til I snap the ball means that I
get started slowly, but I'm sure
with practice I can overcome this
difficulty."
Oosterbaan has been closely ob-
serving the other converted line-
men, as they adjust to the move.
"Wojcik is the only one who play-
ed center in high school and has

r . :
:.:;,
, ..%

done quite well lately," he said,
and added, "He will help the team.
We have not had enough time yet
to evaluate Morrow's perform-
ance."

WOLVERINE AIMING FOR 15':
Gibson Prepares for Marquette Star

i

By CHUCK KOZOLL
Aiming for the magic 15' mark,
Mamon Gibson combines mental
skill with physical endurance to
reach the top in the pole vaulters
circle.
Saturday's competition with
Marquette and Western Michigan
will afford Gibson a chance to bet-
ter his top mark of 14'4" accom-
plished in the Penn Relays last
Saturday.,
Chief among Gibson's rivals will
be Marquette's Ed Hoyle, who has
soared 14'6" this spring.
Planning Important
Back of the Wolverine athlete's
drive to surpass Hoyle in vaulting
dominance are a combination of
planning and constant practice of
techniques.
"I may work on one movement
over a dozen times each day to
get it down pat," noted Gibson.
Pole vaulting demands a flawless

approach and a coordinated take-
off to get the right momentum for
a successful ump. Before attempt-
ing the jump, Gibson determines
the correct distance to start his
run in order to insure the right
speed and drive- to reach the de-
sired height.
"I usually measure off a distance
of about 60' and stride in that area
until I can determine the distance
I need to gain the right momen-
tum for takeoff," said Gibson.
After locating the point of take-
off, Gibson measures the two dis-
tances from that point and places
down two markers. The first peg
marks the point where he should
begin the run and the second,, at
the halfway point to the bar,
helps him check his stride and
gage his speed in the final dis-
tance.
Gibson also figures out the best
position to hold his pole to reach

the various heights. "For momen-
tum I hold it at a point between
11' and 13' from the end of the
pole," added Gibson.
Gibson observes the fine points
of other stars to figure out his best
method. "I usually look to Bob
Richards, Olympic star, for the
best push-off and Bob Gutowski,
world record holder in the vault,
for the ideal swing up into the
air and over the bar," the Wol-,
verine vaulter added.

Dickey's .545 Average
Paces Big Ten Batters

1

By FRED KATZ

v'

I

DELT SIGS, ATO TRIUMPH:
Phi Gamma Delta Wins in 'A' Softball-

C",--

By BILL ZOLLA
A terrific pitching duel between
Delta Upsilon's Dave Cobb and
Paul Melgaard, of Phi Gamma
Delta, highlighted yesterday's ac-
tion in the social fraternity soft-
ball games played at Ferry Field.
Phi Gam won the game, 2-1,

scoring their runs in the last in-
ning.
Melgaard hurled a three-hitter
for the victors, andnChuck Steiner
cracked a home run. Cobb allowed
only two hits butone of them was
the vital four-bagger by Steiner.
Striking out nine men, Dale
Geiger of Phi Sigma Kappa pitch-

I

I

Major League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

New York
Kansas City
Washington
Detroit
Cleveland
Baltimore
Boston
Chicago

W L
9 4
8 4
7 4
87
7 7
5 6
4 10
3 9

Pet.
.692
.567
.636
.533
.500
.455
.286
.250

GB
1
2
2%
3
51,2
5%

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 3, Cleveland 2
Detroit 10, New York 1
Kansas City 11, Boston 4
Baltimore 3, Chicago 2
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland . at Washington (N)
Chicago at Baltimore (N)
Kansas City at Boston
Only games scheduled

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
San Francisco 9 5 .643 -
Milwaukee 8 5 .615
Chicago 8 5 .615 %
*Pittsburgh 6 5 .545 1Y2~
Cincinnati 6 5 .545 1Y
Philadelphia 5 7 .417 3
*Los Angeles 5 8 .385 3Y/
St. Louis 3 10 .231 5
*Not including incomplete game
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 10, Philadelphia 1
Chicago 8, Milwaukee 2
Cincinnati 5, St. Louis 4
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles, inc.
TODAY'S GAMES
Milwaukee at Chicago
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles (N)
Philadelphia at San Francisco
Only games scheduled.

ed a four-hitter in leading his
team to a 7-2 win over Chi Psi.
The big blows for the winners were
home runs by Ted Warren and Al
Poellet.
In an extra inning thriller, Delta
Sigma Phi twice came from be-
hind, the last time scoring two
runs in the bottom of the seventh
to edge Pi Lambda Phi, 6-5. At the
end of regulation play, the score
was knotted at four-apiece. Pi
Lam picked up one tally in the
extra stanza on a hit and an error,
but it wasn't enough to hold off
the victors. The winning run was
scored on a wild pitch, after the
losing pitcher Ed Lubin had walk-
ed the bases full.
In other "A" games, Alpha Tau
Omega whipped Theta Chi, 12-7;
Lambda Chi Alpha crushed Theta
Xi, 17-5; Alpha Delta Phi blasted'
Triangle, 11-5; Psi Upsilon nosed
past Phi Kappa Sigma, 7-6; and
Tau Kappa Epsilon defeated Phi
Kappa Tau, 15-5.
Tau Delta Phi took a "B" con-
test from Kappa Sigma, 2 0-18. In
more "B" action, Phi Sigma Delta
smashed Chi Phi, 40-1; Sigma Nu
humbled Theta Chi, 22-10; and
Alpha Tau Omega won over Lamb-
da Chi Alpha, 21-11. Michigan
"B" defeated Lloyd "B", 27-18, in
the lone residence hall game.
In professional fraternity "A"
games, the Law Club beat Phi
Alpha Delta, 8-1, on Gerry Leip-
ply's three-hitter, and Phi Chi
triumphed over Phi Rho Sigma,
10-1.

Jim Dickey is serving notice that
he is out to claim this year's Big
Ten batting crown after being
deprived of it last season through
no fault of his own.
The husky Wolverine catcher is_
deadlocked with Don Foreman of
Indiana for the top spot after
three conference games. Each sport
fancy .545 averages-derived from
six hits in eleven attempts.
Missed Title
Last year Dickeyihit .583 but
didn't,qualify for the title since he
played in only five games.
This personal battle between
the two leaders will be continued
Saturday afternoon when the Wol-
verines host the league-leading
Hoosiers in an important double-
header at Ferry Field.
Dickey had a fieldhdayin last
Saturday's double header with
Michigan State. In seven trips to
the plate that afternoon, he crack-
ed out five hits-the best day the
burly catcher has had in a Michi-
gan uniform.
As a team Michigan is third in
hitting with 22 hits in 87 at-bats
for a .253 percentage. Purdue,
which shares the standings lead
with Indiana, has a .001 edge over
their home state rival, .277 to .276.
The Wolverines have estab-
lished themselves as the most pro-
lific fencebiisters thus far. They
claim four of the eight home
runs hit in Big Ten play.
Hairstyling to please:
Try us for:
* CIkEW-CUTS
0 PRINCETONS
" PERSONALITY CUTS
"@11 HAIRCUTTERS
The Daseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

The top "M" slugger at this
stage is first sacker Bill Roman.
He is tied with two others in total
bases, all three having eight each.
His .364 batting average is good
for ninth place.
In team fielding Michigan is
runner-up to surprise leader Min-
nesota. The Gophers' record stands
at 1-2, yet they have made only
three errors. The Wolverines have
five miscues for a .950 percentage.
JUST RECEIVED
ONE LOT
$8.95 Gabardine
SLACKS
slight irregulars
CHOICE
$595
WALK A FEW STEPS
AND SAVE DOLLARS
Open Monday 'til 9 P.M.

Saffell & Bush has taken
the w"provenwash and
wear" cord suit, 65 % do.
cron - 35% cotton, and
tailored it to perfection.
(Stop in and see a good
wash and wear suit.)
3995
Saffell Bush
310 Sout hiState

i

I

.11

ANN ARBOR YELLOW CAB
offers 24-hour Service
in the city and to Willow Run
"A THINKING FELLOW CALLS A, YELLOW"

Doubte-headeri
wear the
ARROW
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at
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***

_

Read and Use Michigan Daily Classifieds

I.

-Im

1

1958 MICHIGAN
INVITATIONAL DRILL MEET
MIDWEST CHAMPIONSHIP
TEAMS
Schedule

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Morning
Afternoon.

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