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March 07, 1958 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-03-07

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4 'V$ VVv

T'ME MICHIGAN DAILY

Jessup Cites
International
Court Roles
By ROBERT SNYDER
"The traditional and still gen-
erally accepted theory of interna-
tional law is that it is a law among
States, that only States are sub-
jects of the law, that international
law affects the individual only in-
directly," Prof. Philip C. Jessup
of the Columbia University Law
School said yesterday.
Prof. Jessup, in the fourth of
his series of five Thomas M. Cooley
lectures under the general theme
of "The Use of International Law
-A Re-examination," refuted this
"traditional" concept of interna-
tional law.
Home Country Defends
The professor pointed out that
there are a great many cases
when individuals of various coun-
tries are represented by their
home country in claims against
foreign states.
Typical of such eases is one in
which a citizen of the United
States is imprisoned -without trial
or has his property destroyed or
expropriated in some other coun-
try.
"Suffice it to recall," Prof. Jessup
said, "that international law mar-
ried theory to reality by adopting
the explanation that a state could
be injured through an injury in-
fIlicted upon one of its citizens."
Lawmakers Reluctant
Prof. Jessup then brought out
the reluctance of United States
lawmakers in allowing individuals
direct, access to the International
Court of Justice.
These lawmakers seem to feel
that this would lead1 to a concept
of "supranationality" by letting
private citizens bypass their own
states, going, instead, directly to
an international body.
However, the United States
could make a definite step in the
right direction by perhaps seeking
the cooperation of Canada in an
experimental claims / commission.
Canada was suggested because
"these two governments for nearly
half a century have had in exist-
ence an International Joint Com-
mission to deal with boundary
problems."

EX-JUDICIARY CHAIRMAN:
Stahl Emphasizes 'Learning To Think'

I

K

By DOUGLAS VIELMETTI
"Learning to think is the most
important thing that we learn to
do on this campus," Bob Stahl,
'58, commented looking back on
four very active years at the Uni-
versity.
Stahl retired last month as
chairman of Joint Judiciary
Council, a job which taxed his
thinking in the sphere of student
problems and affairs.
"There was very little adminis-
trative work," Stahl said. "We
just tried to think in the best and
most constructive way for four
hours each week."
Didn't Seek Glory
Stahl did not seek or find glory
in this job. The council meets be-
hind closed doors and its decisions
are not made public. Contact is
only between. students involved
and members of the council.
Stahl considers Joint Judiciary
one of the most worthwhile cam-
pus organizations. He sees in it
a group of students sincerely de-
voted to helping other students
and feels such a group can ap-
preciate these problems best.
"Of course," he says, "no one
likes the person who slaps him on
the wrist. But we always tried to
handle cases efficiently and im-
partially."
Works for Union
Stahl did not limit himself to
Joint Judiciary Council. He is now
serving on the board of directors
of the Michigan Union, 'and has
served with Interfraternity Coun-
cil on the rushing committee and
as chairman of the fraternity re-
lations committee.
Stahl reports that the latter of-
fice made him a member of more
committees and groups than he
can remember. He is also a mem-
ber of Michigamua, Sphinx, and
Phi Kappa Phi, all-campus schol-
astic honorary.
Active in the Phi Gamma Delta
fraternity, Stahl considers his
fraternity affiliation a "great" ex-
perience. The Phi Gam house has
been Stahl's home for the past
three years, and he is currently
serving as chapter recording sec-
retary.
Stahl rates effective allocation

On the driving situation, he re-
ferred to his "rational man" sev-
eral times. Stahl thinks the
current age limits are reasonable
in view of conditions of parking
space availability.
As a scholar and activities man,
Stahl feels that these hai been
and will continue to be a change
in attitude among students' ideas
on scholarship and activities.
"I don't think that any of the
organizations on campus are par-
ticularly overstaffed this year,"
Stahl mentioned.
Rais'e Standards
Stahl thinks that the new
honors program, the 'Undergradu-
ate Library, and increased enroll-
ments will stiffen competition
among students and raise schol-
arship standards even higher on
the campus.
The ex-chairman of Joint Ju-
diciary feels that Student Govern-
ment Council can extend itself in
creating good will and cooperation
with the student body.
"From what I can see, SGC has
concerned itself with matters of
jurisdiction and with matters of
its own power," he says. It has ig-
nored the fact that any real power
will be derived from the good will
of the student body."
To Join Navy
Naval ROTC has taken some
more of Stahl's time on campus,
and will take three years of his
time after graduation. "It is a
career possibility all right, along
with working in the field of econ-
omics or law."
Winding up his four years at
Michigan, Stahl finds himself as
busy as ever.
He is devoting tirme to complet-
ing his economics honors paper,
exploring job opportunities - just
to find out what it is like, and
preparing for his coming marriage
to Julie Fahnestock, '58, president
of Mortar Board, senior womens
honorary, and a member of Alpha
Chi Omega.

-Daily-Eric Arnold
BOB STAHL-Former Joint Judiciary Council Chairman places
learning to think and effective allocation of time as most
important in a college education. Planning on entering the Navy
after graduation in June he will then probably find work in

economics or law.
e
of time among tale tremendcus of-
ferings of the University as second
in importance. And as an honor
student since his four point aver-
age first semester, Stahl has ex-
celled in his academic endeavors.
He was named president of Phi
Eta Sigma, freshman men's schol-
astic honorary, during his second
semester. Stahl now has a 3.75
over-all average. Enrolled in the
economis honor program, he was
awarded the Sims senior scholar-
ship in economics which carried
a $500 stipend.
Stahl considers economics to be
a very worthwhile and interesting
discipline. He feels it supercedes
the sociological, cultural, political
and historical fields as the lan-
guage of our day.
Reason Answers
When answering a question,
Stahl usually begins with "well,

how would any rational man look
at it? It's just a matter of reason-
ing it out.",
"The drinking regulations are a
legal necessity," he said, "and we
as citizens have a loyalty to it.
Twenty-one is a well established
age limit which is really more so-
cial custom than anything else.
It's hard to legislate a different
social convention and dictate a
lower age limit."
"As to a drinking problem, I
don't believe it to be too great,"
Stahl continued. "Apparently
there is a good deal of discretion
used by students on this campus."

I

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SCIENCE MADE SIMPLE: NO. 2
Though this column is intended solely as a vehicle for well-
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Today let us take up the science of medicine, which was in-
vented in 1066 by a Greek named Hippocrates. He soon gathered
around him a group of devoted disciples whom he called
"doctors." The reason he called them "doctors" was that they
spent all their time sitting around the dock and shooting the
breeze. In truth, there was little else for them to do because
disease was not invented until 1477.
After that, doctors became very busy, but it must be admitted
that their knowledge of medicine was lamentably meagre. They
knew only one treatment-a change of climate. For example,
a French doctor would send all his patients to Switzerland.
A Swiss doctor, on the other hand, would send all his patients
to France. By 1789 the entire population of France was living
in Switzerland, and vice versa. This later became known as the
Black Tom Explosion.
Not until 1924 did medicine, as we know it, come into being.
In that year in the little Bavarian village of Pago-Pago an
elderly physician named Winko Sigafoos discovered the hot
water bottle. He was, of course, burned as a witch, but his son
Lydia, disguised as a linotype, made his way to America where
he invented the Mayo Brothers.
Medicine, as it is taught at your very own college, can be
divided roughly into two classifications. There is internal medi-
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which is the treatment of externs.
Diseases also fall into two, broad categories-chronic and
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out picking up tinfoil, and it was months before the wretched
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Two years ago Haskell had Addison's disease. (Addison, curi-
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:Sn. T rzess you are what they call a natural born catcher.'

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