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March 17, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, MARCH 17,1957

THE M]rCMC.ART UAU.V

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SUNDY, MRCH 7, 957 fl1 VM rlVt£ ~l ilI A T l

PAGE THREE

c

MANY COMPLAINTS REGISTERED:
Slow Library Service Draws Criticism

By JANET Wr4CZEWSKI
The General Library has beenI
the brunt of criticism in recent
months for its alleged "slowness"
in operations.
Students and faculty have ex-
pressed majop. complaints about
too slow book withdrawal processes,
books'lost and not replaced and
conditions of library stacks.
Examination of library process-

V

College Roundup
THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI has abolished all class cuts,!
according to The Mississippian, campus newspaper.
The school, which previously allowed cutting classes as long as it
was not "excessive" has passed a new ruling which requires anyone
missing class to present a "legal excuse."
Individual instructors may not authorize "bolts" and any classes
missed will be taken into consideration when final grades are deter-
mined.

I

LOVE THAT BOOKSHOP
- Bob Marshall's

1

1

es reveals the cause of complaints
stem from overcrowded, ineff°cient
conditions, as well as present re-
construction.
General Library has eight floors
of behind-the-scenes book storage,
known as stacks.
About half of the library books
are stored here, under a Dewey
Decimal classification system that
may find books alphabetically list-

Rumsey Edges Newberry
Cagers in Gloved Contest

ed D-F in subject matter i.n fourth is a relatively simple process, Fred
floor stacks, with books on naval L. Dimock, chief circulation librar-
science on seven, and books on ian, remarked.
agriculture shipped to North Cam- Dimock expressed some concern
pus storage. over the accommodation of second
The system of classification used semester English students working
by the library is that of the Li- on assigned library papers in the
brary of Congress. The collection coming weeks.
in belles letters, however, has nev- The library staff will have to be
er been reclassified from the Dewey increased by at least 200 working
decimal system to that of the Li- hours weekly to handle the expect-
brary of Congress. ed turnover of research material,
Director Frederick H. Wagman he observed.
hopes eventually to reclassify this Size of the present circulation
part of the collection. staff is 22 full-time people and an
Books Being Moved estimated 50 to 60 part-time stu-
Books in the stacks are in a pro- dents.I
cess of being moved to provide ad- An explanation of the routine
ditional space. necessary to check out a book
Many volumes have been stored stored in the, stacks explains the
in the attic, and great numbers recent difficulties.
are going to the new stack build- Sl Filled Out
ing on North Campus.To i stin a book the applicant
Completed in 1954, this modern first fills out a request slip. The
building consists of a simple stack slip is then taken over to the

4'

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FRATERNITIES AT DARTMOUTH will be faced with a 25 per cent
increase in property taxes next year.
The Dartmouth reports that this is the second rise in taxes to be
faced by the fraternities in three years. Half of the new increase will
be used to purchase new furniture for additions to local elementary
schoolt.

11

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block containing four tiers of
stacks, arranged in five-foot-long
drawers instead of space wasting
shelves.
A relatively small structure, this
building contains 400,000 volumes.
Obtained on Request
These books, and those in attic
storage, are on file in the general
library, and can be obtained on
request within a day's notice.
Construction of ninth and tenth
floor stacks in the General Library.'
soon to be completed, will provide
additional book room in the near
future, Wagman commented.
Everyone is not permitted to use
the stacks because of confusion
which would result. Stack permits
are necessary for entering the
stacks, and must be shown when
users of the stacks withdraw books.
With the completion of the Un-
dergrad Library next September
and the origin of a freshman li-
brary orientation program, it may
be feasible to open the General1
Library stacks to more undergrad-l
uates, Wagman said.I
Borrowing books from the stacks,

charging desk, where books are
given out.
The slip is placed in a tube at
the desk and sent to the stack sta-
tions -where the book is kept.
Stack workers read the slip, fill
the order if possible and place the
wanted book on the only workable
lift, which carries the volume back
to the main desk.
If books are for use within the
building, slips marked "Building
Use Only" will be placed in them.
Books allowed overnight circula-
tion are dated in the back of each.
Search Made
When a General Library book
cannot be located, the applicant
may request the Charging Desk to
make a special search for it. A
report will be ready the following
day.
A book which cannot be found
within a two week period is termed
lost and is reordered.
The General Library, like most
large research libraries, has not
been able to take an inventory in
many years because of the time
and the expense involved.

THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO Daily reports that the silent
record in the student union juke box has been removed.
Only one-half of one per cent of the students interviewed in an
all-campus poll appreciated the silence. "The poll also claims that
silence 'is out of keeping with the riotous environment of the grill.'"
University of Colorado students do appreciate rock 'n roll, the
report mentioned. It is also noted that the silent record lost money
during the time it remained in the juke box to the tune of five cents
a day.
THE DAILY REVEILLE of Louisiana State University has charged
that its student cafeteria could now pass "only as a second-rate
hash house."
Besides high prices the complaints are attributed to "the male
students at LSU who have become disgustingly particular about what
they eat. Now they demand toast that tastes like toast."
iN

Aj
'',?4

i
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GLOVES, GIRLS, BASKETBALL (?)-Above shot, contributed by
Allen Rumsey's Bob Schneider, is from action in Friday's basket-
ball game between Rumsey and Helen Newberry. The two squads
will play a return match Thursday, at the I-M Open House.
4,

I

Despite a double handicap, an
Allen Rumsey basketball squad
came from behind Friday night to
edge Helen Newberry, 13-12.
Rumseyites, wearing boxing
gloves on each hand, were re-
quired to play under girls' bas-
ketball rules.
Due to their gloved hands, all
field goals for the Rumsey squad
came from within six feet of the
basket.
Ann Patterson '60 headed the
Newberry scorers with seven
points.
Tony Taddeo, '58E of the gloved
unit, evened Patterson's tally.

Members of the Rumsey group
testified that despite the boxing
gloves Taddeo was able to make a
foul shot.
Rumsey men reported that the
Newberry contingent attempted a
total of 20 foul shots.
"They weren't very good," re-
ported a Rumsey played. "They
only made two shots from the foul
line."
Referees were: Sheila Guifke,
'60, Caroline Strutz, '60N, and
Mary Collins, '60, of Newberry, and
Joe Johnston, '58, of Rumsey.

r r rirrr_ r . e sr rrwr r. rr

!II

Sigma Alpha Iota Chapter
To Present Annual Musicale

By ROBERTA FINKEL
Alpha chapter of Sigma Alpha
Iota will present its annual mu-
sicale tonight at 8:30 p.m. in An-
gell Hall's Auditorium A.
The program will consist of
various veins of music. In the
classical vein will be a piano so-
nata, as well as a selection for the
flute. Five semi-classical selections
will also be performed.
Sigma Alpha Iota, professional
music fraternity for women, at-
tempts to promote contemporary
music by the groups sponsoring a
national competition in which
American composers can enter
their work. They also maintain the
MacDowell Colony where talented
students can live and compose.
Tere on campus, Alpha chapter,
founded in 1903, has sponsored
annual musicales and has given
piano instruction to hospitalized
children. The alumnae have do-
nated four pianos 'to the hospital
which are used by members of
the sorority for this purpose.
Other girls in SAI are working
with the recreational therapists
at the hospital in teaching songs,
dances and general music appreci-'
ation to the children.
Friday, May 3, SAI will sponsor
a May Festival Luncheon for wom-
en performers in the concerts and
wives of men performers.
Members of SAI also partici-
pate in many campus presenta-

tions including the Gilbert and
Sullivan productions.
Opening tonight's program will
be Helen Mendelson, pianist, who
will play the first movement of
Copland's "Sonata."
Patricia Martin, flutist, accom-
panied by Linda Reck, pianist, will
perform the "Poem for Flute and
Orchestra," by Griffes.
Sally Myers will sing two songs
by composer-pianist and alumnus,
Mrs. Pearl Reimann.
Following intermission, Jane
Hirschmann, piano, will play "Two
Piano Blues," by Copland. "Fiddle-
Doodle-ad," by 'U' professor Ross
Lee Finney, will be performed by
Virginia Shapoe, violinist, and Sue
La Core, pianist guest of SAT.
Concluding the program will be
Sheila McKenzie, violinist, and
guests Arthur Follows and Rob-
ert Rickman, performing Yure-
gir's "Trio."

The University of Michigan Ring
. . .
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every undergraduate and alumnus.
THIS RING is offered in 10K Gold at only
$38.42 which includes all taxes. Terms are:
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on delivery.
State at North University

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Maximum fashion, a little jacket of shaded
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ON CAMPUS

INTERVIEWS

\

MARCH 19
Register at Placement Office

r

217 South Main

9 Nickels Arcade

!"ices rc

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FcT
MONTH LY
BIRTHDAY
CARDS
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GOING to a PARTY
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You'll love the BRIGHT, GAY, FRESH look of
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See or phone your college placement
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