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March 17, 1957 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-17

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AGE! TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 1967

~GE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MARCIE 17, 1R~7

'U T oStudy
Modern-Day
'Pressures'
The pressures of modern living
and how well Americans are able
to cope with them will be the sub-
Ject of a nation-wide study by the
University's Survey Research Cen-
ter being initiated this month.
"Many experts have talked about
the strains and pressures under
which we live today," Prof. Angus
Campbell, director of the Center
explains. "Some people feel the
rapid pace may be unhealthy, while
others claim the stress of modern
living is not too grea.
"Such a matter is of vital con-
cern in assessing the productivity
and health of the American people
as a nation," he continues.
"Congress and the U.S. Public
Health Service are sufficiently con-
cerned about this q'zestion to ap-
propriate funds for studies in this
area. Our survey is part of this
program of research."

FRENCH HISTORICAL AUTHORITY:
Records Influence on U.S. Thought

By BEVERLY GINGOLD
The influence or non-influence
of the French Enlightenment on
American political thought is still
quite controversial, according to
Prof. Paul M. Spurlin of. the
French department.
Prof. Spurlin's specialty is 18th
century French literature.
He claims that despite much re-
search in the field, "disagreement
persists and errors abound" in
evaluating Franco-American intel-
lectual relations in the colonial,
period and in the formative years
of the American governrlent.
Prof. Spurlin has particularly
studied the influence in America of
Montesquieu, the French 18th cen-
tury political thinker, concerning
the doctrine of the tripartite separ-
ation of the executive, legislative
and judicial powers.
Principle Expressed
This principle of tripartite sep-
arating of powers is expressed in,
the chapter on the British consti-

Evening Worship . . . 7:00 to 7:45 P.M.
"WHY DID GOD HAVE TO
BECOME MAN?"

tution in Montesquieu's "The
Spirit of the Laws."
Prof. Spurlin presented his con-
clusions on the influence of Mon-
tesquieu at the Congress Montes-
quieu held in May 1955 at Bor-
deaux commemorating the 200th
anniversary of the death of the
great French thinker.
His pamphlet "The Influence of
Montesquieu on the American Con-
stitution" was recently published
in a volume of the proceedings of
the Congress, at which he was one
of the two American Montesquieu
specialists.
Provided Formula
"Montesquieu, by his enuncia-
tion of the tripartite doctrine of
separation of the* powers, pro-
vided the verbal formula for a
concept which colonial thought
had been slowly elaborating," Prof.
Spurlin said.
"More than any other writer, he
gave to a tendency in America, its
literary expression."
The professor's conclusions were
drawn from his dissertation, "Mon-
tesquieu in America, 1760-1801,"
published in 1940. The study was
part of Prof. Spurlin',s work toward
his doctorate inFrench at Johns
Hopkins University.
The book was an objective at-
Correspondent
To Give Talk
Paul Shinkman, Washington
correspondent and news commen-
tator will speak tomorrow at Rack-
ham Amphitheatre in a University
Lecture in Journalism.
His topic will be "Behind the
News in Washington."
Shinkman will preview the pros-
pects of the next four years in
Washington as Iegards both the
national and international field.
He is an active member of the
National Press Club and regularly
attends the President's news con-
ferences.
Shinkman was formerly a for-
eign correspondent for the Chicago
Tribune and has revisited Europe,
incouding the Iron Citsin area,
on numerous roving news assign-
nients.

tempt to reconstruct everything
about Montesquieu in the late
colonial period and in the forma-
tive years of the American repub-
lic.
Approach Differed
Prof. Spurlin explained that his
approach to Montesquieu differed
from that of other scholars who
simply assumed Montesquieu's
contribution to American from
the fact that the principles of the
tripartite doctrine expressed by!
Montesquieu in 1748 were repeated,
in the American constitution.
"I wanted to evaluate Montes-1
quicu's influence by building aj
'vast mosaic' from the early Amer-
ican sources on the man," Prof.
Spurlin declared.
He discovered that many of the
colonial newspapers quoted freely
from Montesquieu's "The Spirit of!
the Laws," and that copies of the
book belonged to the libraries of
Franklin, Marshall, Madison and
other great American statesmen.
"By 1787," Prof. Spurlin re-
marked, 'The Spirit of the Laws'1
was an 'American' classic.
"However, Montesquieu's ideas
on the separation of the powers
would not have had their tremen-
dous effect if the groundwork for
their acceptance had not been laid
in the colonial period."
He explained that while colonial
charters made no provisions for
tripartite separation, there was
nevertheless a tendency towards
such separation in colonial govern-
ment.
"In other words," he said, "I
found indigenous growth of tri-
partite separation of powers on
,American soil before The Spirit
of the Laws' was published."
'Grain of Salt'
"Montesquieu provided the
'grain of salt', so to speak, that
crystallized American thinking."
In 1955, the same year that Prof.
Spurlin presented his views at the
Congress Montesquieu, he was a
Fulbright lecturer on American
civilization and literature at the
Universities of Lille and Grenoble.
He has published various articles
on Franco-American literary and
intellectual relations.
Currently, Prof. Spurlin has un-
derway a study of Rousseau's con-
tribution to American thought.

Wisconsin
Airs Student
Beer Issue
Controversy recently raged on
the University of Wisconsin cam-
pus as to whether students under
21 should be permitted to pur-
chase beer at special places under
the supervision of religious or edu-
cational institutions.
Wisconsin vice-president Ken-
neth Little spoke against a. bill
which would permit any student
under 21 to continue to purchase
beer in a school-spcnsored estab-
lishment or at Marquette Univer-
sity.
At an assembly meeting, Robert
Haass spoke for the bill as a Wis-
consin alumnus by saying "unless
students have normal outlets,
they're going to go out looking for
some place to drink." This would
"create a much worse problem,"
he added.
Currently, Wisconsin law per-
mits "any person," whether 21 or
18, to frequent special places un-
der the auspices of a "recognized
religious institution or of any edu-
cational institution."
Speaking for the bill, assembly-
man Tom Duffy, a Marquette
alumnus, said "Students are re-
sponsible, decent, wholesome
people who need some entertain-
ment." He added that beer might
just as well be served when stu-
dents have proms and dances, "so
they will come and stay."
A second bill pending in the
Wisconsin Assembly would raise
the age limit from 18 to 21 for
consumption offbeer where it is
sold, but would not affect sales of
packaged beer.
Organization
Notices
Roger Williams Fellowship, Bible study
class, March 17, 9:45 a.m., Guild House.
Topic: "Hosea."
* * s
Roger Williams Fellowship, fellowship
program, March 17, 6:45 p.m., Guild
House. Mr. and Mrs. Broad will lead
an illustrated discussion on work with
lepers in Africa.
* Cf 4

WM. S. BAKER, Preaching

t

IFEflS

Sponsored by W.S.F.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Coffee break and discussion following

CAMPUS

}._ .. NOW
M-G-Ms
or
IFER%
IM A
KCIRK DOUGLAS
as Van Gogh
CinemaScope - Metrocolor

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES .
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
j New Atlas Tires
With written warranty, 6.70x15,
$15.95; 7.10x15, $17.65; 7.60x15, $f9.95
(with recappable tire and tax). No
money down, up to 8 months to
pay.
Hickey's Service Station
300 N. Main, cor. Catherine NO 8-7717
)S61
For the Best in
Tires, Batteries, and Service
see
"HOB" GAINSLEY
SERVICE
So. University & Forest
)S49
TIRE SALE
Prices slashed
Big trade-in for used tires
Fully Guaranteed
GOLDEN'S SERVICE
featuring STANDARD Products
601 Packard - NO 8-9429
)S52
C-TECD
STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our busi-
ness. Atlas tires, batteries
and accessories. Warranteed
& guaranteed. See us for
the best price on new tires
-also used tires. Road serv-
ice - mechanic on duty.
Open Mon. through Sat.
7:30 A.M. - 10 P.M.
Sunday 9 A.M. - 8 P.M.
1220 So. University NO 8-9168
)859
PERSONAL
MAGAZINE Subscriptions at special
rates. Student Periodical; NO 2-3061.
)F170
D-dependable
O-outstanding
N-nominee
COLWELL for J-Hop
)F179
I HAD VALUABLE translations in the
basket of the black Crown Royal bike
that was removed from Couzens Hall
Wed. night. These represented many
months of hard work. Please drop
off at Int'I Center. )F178
CLASS OF '59: The 1958 J-Hop is YOUR
J-Hop. Help make it a success by
casting YOUR vote for STEVE
SCHWARTZ for J-Hop Committee.
)F167
ATTENTION SOPHOMORES: Vote
JOEL KOENIG for J-Hop. )F166
NEW LOCATION MARGARET SHOP-
Uniforms and furs, up to 50% off.
Fur tricks for spring styling. 516 E.
Liberty, NO 5-5729. )F142
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords - $7.25;
socks, 39c; shorts, 69c; military sup-
plies.

PETS & SUPPLIES
AQUARIUMS, tropical fish and sup-
plies. Water lizards and hamsters.
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM
328 E. Liberty NO 3-0224
)T6
ALL COLORS - baby parakeets and
breeders. Canaries. Baby cockatiel,
cages.305 W. Hoover. NO 2-2403. )T3
RADIOS, REPAIRS
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RARE VIOLINS
AND BOWS
ALL ACCESSORIES, STRINGS,
REPAIRS
MADDY MUSIC
508 E. Williams
NO 3-3223
)X5
POWERFUL R.C.A. PORTABLE TV.
Transformer powered
$149.95 and up
MUSIC CENTER
300 S. Thayer
)X8
USED CARS
1949 DODGE CORONET-Best reason-
able offer, 616 Lawrence, NO 3-1670.
)N111
48 NASH under 50,000 miles. Clean for
its age, overhauled motor, good trans-
portation at $125. 2008 Day St. or
call NO 2-8576. )N106
Shop At
DOUG'S PLACE
3106 Washtenaw Ave.
(at the sign of Speedway 79)
30 ONE OWNER CARS
mostly low mileage
All Priced Right
from $75 up
DOUG GREGORY
World's Smallest Large Volume
FORD DEALER
Deal with Doug- Doug' l Deal
Phone NO 3-6162 (N100
USED CARS
MIDWINTER
SPECIAL
1953 Pontiac 8 Fordor sedan. Radio
and heater, hydramatic, $745.
1953 Ford Custom 8 fordor. Radio,
heater,* and overdrive, $645.
1955 Chevrolet Bel Air 8 Sedan. Ra-
dio and heater, $1195.
1955 Ford fordor. Radio and heater,
very clean, $1065.
1951 DeSoto fordor sedan. Clean,
good running car, $295.
KLINGLER
PONTIAC, INC.
2500 Jackson
at Stadium Blvd.
Phone NO 2-3221
Open 8:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M.
)N110
MUSICAL MERCHANDISE,
RADIOS, REPAIRS

ALTERATIONS
Dressmaking
Tailoring, restyling. Will do fitting in
your home or mine. Experienced,
minimum charges. NO 5-6370.
Pick-up and Delivery
)P3
DRESSMAKER
Mending - Alterations. Ph. NO 2-9541.
)P1
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted, $18, or new silk
shawl collar, $25. Write to Michaels
Tailoring Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit,
Michigan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. )P2
FOR RENT
DOUBLE ROOMS or single rooms for
girls, twin beds, two closets, com-
munity kitchen. 517 E. Ann St. Phone
NO 2-2826. )C 98
LARGE, comfortable single room in
private home for man or woman,
reasonable rates, linens provided, 1015
Michigan Ave. NO 2-4661. )C93
GARAGE FOR RENT in campus-Burns
Park area, 1015 Michigan Ave. NO 2-
4661. )094
SINGLE ROOM, pleasant surroundings
convenient to campus. $8 per week.
1227 S. State, NO 3-1650. )C88
ONE BLOCK from campus. Large t
room apartment. Also one man to
share apartment with three, same
location. Phone NO 2-1443. )C74
REAL ESTATE
THE
BUTTS & SWISHER CO.
REALTORS
FOR ANN ARBOR WOODS
(Washtenaw at Stadium)
Models Open Daily 10-8 )RI
HELP WANTED
BABY SITTER wanted to care for one
child on Tuesdays and Thursdays
from April 1st to June 1st. Call NO
8-8995 on Mon., Wed., and Fri. be-
fore 5:30. )H21
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part-
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company.
Phone NO 8-9382. )H20
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE FOR 2. Buffalo or vicinity. Leav-
ing March 22. Return March 24. Call
Emmie Lou Dias, NO 8-6922.
RENT a clean car
Daily, Weekly or Hourly Rates
Reservations made anywhere
Rent A Car
AYE: 514 E. Washington St.
Phone NO 3-4156

1.

q

:1

A4

"Wonderful
to see"
-Herald, Tribvne
Shows Today
at
3, 5, 7, 9 andlO P.M.

4

M

The Congregational and Disciples
Student Guild, discussion group, March
17, 9:20 a.m., Guild House. Topic: "Phi-
Ilosophy of Religion."

TONIGHT at 8:00 only
Gian-Carlo Menatti's
Opera
with
Original Broadway Cast
Architecture Auditorium 50c

LOVE THAI BOOKSHOP

- Bob Marshall'I s

p.

i

ON
STAGE

GM

Wednesday
March 20th
r f A ,. . .. TD .IIIYIID a

"CANADIAN TRIUMPH...
Washington Star
NATIONAL
OF CTN DA
Celia David Lois
FRANCA ADAMS - SMITH
COMPANY OF 70 WITH FULL ORCHESTRA

The Congregation and Disciples Stu-
dent Guild, March 17, 7:00 p.m., Memor-
ial Christian Church. Dr. and Mrs. Wil-
liam Genne, marriage counselors from
Flint: "Courtship and Engagement.'
* *
Young Democratic Club, meeting,
March 18, 7:30 p.m., Union room 3A.
Speaker: Gus Scholle, President Michi-
gan CIO Council, "Washington Labor
Hearings and the Teamsters Union."
Unitarian Student Group, March 17,
7:00 p.m., 1st Unitarian Church. Dr.
Robert Blood, "Dating Problems of the
College Student."
** *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, March
17, 4:00 p.m., Lane Hall. Dr. Kenneth
Pike, "Is Sincerity Enough?"
* * *
University of Michigan Folk Dancers,
aaprogram of intermediate dances,
March 18, 7:30-10:00 p.m., Lane Hall.
Graduate Outing Club, hiking and
supper, March 17, 2:00 p.m., Rackham.
- *
Hillel Foundation student Zionist Or-
ganization, discussion: "Why a Jewish
State?" March 17, 8:30 p.m., Hilel. Also,
Israeli singing and dancing.
* * *
Latvian Students Club, regular
monthly meeting, March 17, 7:00 p.m.,
International Center.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

)C13{
TRANSPORTATION: MIAMI -- Fly
round trip. Leaving April 5, 6 p.m.
plus tax. Will Aeave on April 5 and
return Sunday, April 14. Call RICH-
ARD'S TRAVEL AGENCY, NO 2-7414.
BUSINESS SERVICES
RE-WEAVING--Burns, tears, moth holes,
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop. 224 Nickels Arcade.
)J2
WASHINGS-Also ironing separately.
Specialize in cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and deli-
very.' Phone NO 2-9020. )J23
TYPEWRITER REPAIR and service.
Pick-up and delivery. Moseley Type-
writer Service. 204 N. 4th Avenue, NO
3-5888. )J53
PHOTO SUPPLIES
ARGUS C44
Used. Camera, case and flash.
jAke new.
$75
THE QUARRY, INC.
320 S. State St. NO 3-1991
more than just a camera shop )D73
CAMERA-Canon model IV, 100 mm.
lens, 35 mm lens. Flash attachment,
light meter, filters, etc. Leather car-
rying bases $250. 616 Lawrence, NO
3-1670. )D74

SAM'S STORE
Phone NO 3.0800
122 East Washington

BALDWIN PIANOS
Acrosonic Spinets
Used spinets and uprights
Maddy Music
508 E. William
NO 3-3223 )X1
Hi Fi Studio
Largest Inventory of HI FI components
in the area.

)B2051

ORCH ESTRA
$3.00 $2.50 $2.00

BALCONY
$2.00 $1.50 $1.00

I

LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-eye glasses. 1027 Forest, NO 8-
6577. )A112
LOST-Brown Leather U.M. notebook
and novel. Vital notes within. Dave
Cooper, NO 3-2823. )A109

I

Authorized
Dyna-Kit
Electro-Voice
Rek-O-KIt
AR-1
Colloro
Pickering
Jim Lansing
Wharfdale

dealer for:
David Bogen
University
Janzen
Garrard
Fairchild
Fisher
McIntosh
and others

YOUNG

Ask about our payment plans and
package specials.
1217& 1317 So. University
NO 2-9595 )X3
HI FI
SEE- HEAR --ADMIRE
Gray's new Concert Duet as
advertised in the New Yorker
Price $695
(Exclusive Dealer)
Audio Supply Laboratories
334 Nickels Arcade

Read
Daily
Classifieds

NO 2-7767

Junior Girls Proudly Present
"LIVE IT UP"
the only all-girl cast
appearing on campus
*
MARCH 22, 8:00 P.M.
MARCH 23, 2:30 (Matinee) and 8:00 P.M.
I *

NO 2-9425
)X6

I U

r

There once was a student
named Pete -'
who desired something

df r
$$ /4different tc

a eat

I

Too young for

KA tSntU

i

I

I

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