100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 06, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1951

ILME MICHIGAN DAILY

11Af"-w ftmurv

WEDNSDAY MARH 81957T~lEMICIGANDA~l a

r T$TH~xz REEm

1Maxwell's Overtime Goal Decides

Vital Ice Contest

Michigan Assured of NCAA Bid;
Icers Rally Twice in Third Period

I-M PLAYOFF RESULTS:
Gomberg, Sigma Chi Cagers Upset

(Continued from Page 1)
Both teams made serious bids
for victory in the last six and one-
half minutes of regulation play,
but both goalies withstood the
rushes.
This pace was continued in the
overtime. Finally, Barrie Hayton
scooped up the puck at his own'
blue line and flashed along the
left boards, carrying the puck in-
to the corner and around towards
the net.
The retreating defense bottled
up the goal mouth, preventing!
WIHL STANDINGS
Team W L T Pts. PL
*Michigan 11 4 1 141/2 71/
Colorado Col. 14 4 0 19 5
Michigan Tech 8 6 4 121/2 91/2
North Dakota 12 8 0 12 8
*WIHL's entries in NCAA tourna-
ment at Colorado Springs, Coo.
March 14-16. Two eastern teams will
be selected from Clarkson College,
R.P.I., St. Lawrence College, and
Harvard.
Hayton from shooting. The puck
dribbled off his stick and scooted
toward the goal mouth. But the
bewildered Yurkovich did not see
the puck.
Maxwell, anxiously waiting at
the right corner of the net, poked
it in for the deciding tally.
In contrast to the tremendous
finish of both teams, the first two
periods Were extremely sluggish.
Michigan was the aggressor
through most of the first period
but its rushes were stymied time
and time again by poor passing
and timely poke checks of the
* North Dakota defense.

SPEED-Neil McDonald outraces two Sioux defenders.
Swim Title Meet Looms
As Four Teams Struggle
By AL WINKELSTEIN

By ART ROSENBAUM 1
Although they lacked control of
the board, Sigma Nu combined
superior ball control and shooting
accuracy to upset Sigma Chi in an
unexpectedly easy manner, 52-37,
in the First Place Social Fraternity
'A' basketball quarterfinals last
night.
Sigma Chi wasn't the only pow-
erhouse that fell last night. Gom-
berg, titan of the Residence Halls,
fell in the Residence Halls 'A'
semi-finals before the well bal-
anced attack of Wenley, 34-33.
It wasn't until after a minute of
furious but scoreless play in the
closing minutes that Wenley was
able to break the tie and stay
ahead.
The Sigma Nu's scoring punch
came in the form of John Larson
and Robert Groff who combined to
score 34 of their team's 52 points.
With four minutes left in their
game, Sigma Phi Epsilon took a
one-point lead over Beta Theta Pi,
climaxing a fantastic comeback
that saw them overcome a third
quarter deficit of 15 points and
continue on to win, 59-56, in a
quarter-final first place playoff.
Adams blasted a 23-10 half-time
lead over Michigan and then with-
stood a second half rally to finally
win the game along with the right
to face Wenley in the first place
fin a ls . .._____________________________________

Looking
for GOOD
DRYCLEAN1NG?
Individual and thorough attention aiv-

RESIDENCE HALL Alpha Delta Phi 26, Phi Sigma Kap-
Second Place Semi-finals pa 14
Taylor 28, Van Tyne 27 Fourth Place Quarter-finals
Chicago 44, Williasms 34 eifnl
Fourth Place Semi-finals Theta Delta Chi 46, Phi Epsilon P1
Huber 51, Allen-Rumsey 9 23 <
Lloyd 38, Strauss 36 Delta Kappa Epsilon 16, Psi Upsi-
SOCIAL FRATERNITY ion 10
Second Place Quarter-finals Zeta Psi 25. Tau Kappa Epsilon 23

BODY CHECK-Michigan's Dick Dunnigan (6) is hampered by
the actions of North Dakota defender Bob Morrison in last night's
action at the Coliseum. Nodak goalie Tom Yurkovich looks on.

Phones
NO 8-6335
NO 8-7017

g gdavIr 1 nI tkrlrrt.i,4IFntt=I-uj-rI n,.-
en to each garment, trouser cuffs
brushed and tacked, seam rips re-
paired, buttons replaced, and linings
sewed.

Michigan goalie Ross Childs
had little work in the first period,
making only six saves.
As the second period opened, it
was obvious that North Dakota
was a changed team. The Sioux's
tiny All American, Bill Reichart,
blasted a couple of tremendous
shots off the pads of the Michi-
gan goalie to open play.
Finally at 16:18 of the second
mark, Reichart rifled a shot in
the left hand corner of Childs' net
to put North Dakota into the lead.
An intercepted pass from the
stick of the Wolverines' Bob,;Pitts
led to the Sioux's second score.
Steenson took the wayward pass

Sport Shorts

to fatten the NoDaks' lead to two
goals at 18:27.
Michigan was playing sporadic
hockey at this time and didn't fi-
nally start to click until the team
began its comeback in the third
period.
Goalies Excel
Both goalies were brilliant
throughout the contest. North Da-
kota's Yurkovich made 34 saves
while Childs garnered 24. Only
their acrobatic netminding kept
the score from climbing.
Colorado Bound
FIRST PERIOD: Scoring - none.
Penalties - N.D., Steenson (trip-
ping) 2:30; N.D., Steenson (tripping)
5:38; N.D., Wilems (high sticking)
11:03, 'M', Switzer (high sticking)
11:03.
Saves - Yurkovich 10, Childs 6.
SECOND PERIOD: Scoring - N.D.
Reichart (Paschke), 16:18; 2 - N.D.
Steenson (Poole) 18:27.
Penalties - 'M', McDonald (high-
sticking) 1:32; N.D., C a s t e l l a n o
(boarding) 6:20, N.D. Paschke (slash-
ing) 8:00; 'M', Hutton (hooking)
11:58.
Saves - Yurkovich 9, Childs 7.
THIRD PERIOD: Scoring - 1. 'M',
Karpinka (unassisted) 6:05; 2. 'M'.,
McDonald (Switzer, Dunnigan) 13:40.
Penalties - N.D. Wiilems (cross-
checking) 1:42, 'M', Hayton (slash-
ing) 3:47, N.D., Armbruster (tripping)
7:11, N.D., Morrison (holding) 7:58,
'M', Maxwell (charging) 8:27.
Saves - Yurkovich 11, Childs 9.
OVERTIME: Scoring - 1. 'M', Max-
well (Hayton) 5:35.
Penalties - none.
Saves - Yurkovich 4, Childs 2.
Total saves - Yurkovich 34, Childs
24.

The Big Ten swimming title
race shapes up as a four team
battle at Minneapolis this week-
end.
Undefeated Michigan, Michi-
gan State, Ohio State and Indi-
ana appear to be the strongest
contenders. On the basis of dual
meet competition, the title could
easily go to any of the four.
In all probability, the team that
is "hot" will wind up with the
championship crown.
Michigan has compiled the best
dual meet record in the Confer-
ence, and holds decisions over all
three of its rivals. However, dual
meet competition is quite differ-
ent from the Conference cham-
pionship, and at Minneapolis,
dual meet records have little or
no meaning.
Defending champion Ohio State
has the Big Ten's two most out-
standing performers, Al Wiggins
and Don Harper. Wiggins can
swim in any event, and it will
take a tremendous effort to deny
him at least two individual titles.
Harper is the nation's best col-
legiate diver, and should face
little opposition in taking top div-
ing honors.
Michigan State lacks the in-
dividual stars that the other three
teams have, but undoubtedly has
the greatest depth. More than
likely, the Spartans should cop
first honors in both of the relay
events, and with several other
strong swimmers may fare quite
well.

Indiana is in much the same
position as Ohio State. They have
two of the nation's top collegiate
swimmers in Bill Woolsey and
Sonny Tanabe, both given good
chances for first place finishes.
Outside of these four teams,
only Iowa has even an outside
chance. The Hawkeyes have a
great sophomore swimmer in Gar-
ry Morris, but do not appear to
have much else.
On the basis of paper strength,
it appears that of the four lead-
ing contenders, Indiana is the
weakest. In dual meet competi-
tion they suffered defeats at the
hands of Ohio State, Michigan
State and Michigan.
Ohio State, last year's title
holder does not appear to be
quite as strong as it has been,
but the Buckeyes are always a
threat in any swimming meet.
The men from Columbus only
suffered one dual meet defeat,
that at the hands of the Wolver-
ines last week.
,WANTED:
Camp Counselor
for Y.W.C.A.
Summer Camp.
25 miles from Ann Arbor.
Call NOrmandy 2-2581
Mrs. Groz

, . ' 1

All This Is Part Of Our Regular Service
FAST SERVICE ON REQUEST
GOLD BOND CLEANERS
515 East William . . . Mon.-Fri. 7-6 . . . Sat. 7-5

w

By The Associated Press
A.P. Cage Poll
Collecting 55 first-place votes
and 711 points, the North Caro-
lina Tar Heels held a comfortable
margin over the runnerup Kansas
Jayhawks in the season's next-
to-last Associated Press poll.
The top five positions remained
unchanged with Kentucky in
third, Southern Methodist in
fourth and Seattle, fifth.
The most notable advances
were made by Michigan State and
Oklahoma City. State, unranked
last week, moved into eighth po-
sition and OCU jumped eight
notches to 10th place.
The top teams with first place
votes and won-lost r e c o r d s

Dees Wins Scoring Crown
CHICAGO - Indiana's Archie
Dees won the Big Ten all-games
basketball scoring title in a breeze,
outdistancing his nearest oppo-
nent by more than 100 points.
Dees compiled a 25-point aver-
age with 550 points in 22 games
while Frank Ioward of Ohio
State finished second with 442
points in 22 games for a 20-point
average.
Coan to Quit
LAKELAND, Fla. - Holdout
Gil Coan has decided not to re-
port to the Detroit Tigers and will
ask the commissioner of baseball
to place him on the voluntarily
retired list.
Distinctive
Haircutting for
WOMEN
Stylists to please you
The Daseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

THE. CARTER OIL COMPANY
RESEARCH LABORATORY
TULSA, OKLAHOMA
Affiliate of Standard Oil Company (N.J.)
Will Interview Students on March 12 and 14, 1957
We Have Positions For: Physicists, Chemists, Mathematicians,
Chemical, Electrical, Mechanical Engineers
Make an appointment through your placement office,
or your departmental office.

E'

1

~~~~r
L-... .~ $,,. A
N~v7""'

through Saturday,
parentheses:
1. North Carolina 55
2. Kansas 8
3. Kentucky 1
4. South. Methodist 1
5. Seattle 5
6. Louisville 1
7. UCLA
8. Michigan State
9. Vanderbilt
10. 6klahoma City 2

March 2 in

(24-0)
(19-2)
(22-4)
(21-3)
(22-2)
(20-5)
(21-4)
(14-7)
(17-5)
(17-8)

711
605
476
399
331
194
188
122
115
101

r----------------------------------------
CHEMISTS
CH EMICALENGINEERS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS
Are YOU Interested In . ..
II
1. Opportunities in Research, Development, En-
gineering and Manufacturing that will challenge
your ability.
Y 2. A company large enough to provide the tools
and opportunities for your growth and develop-
ment; yet small enough to prevent the loss of
your individuality.
3. Advancement in keeping with your capabili-
ties and progress.
4. A formal training program that covers all
phases of our 5 plants, as well as our Central En- 1
gineering and Central Research and Development
Departments.
5. An outstanding Employee Benefit program.
6. A Tuition-Assistance Policy that helps in fur-
thering your technical education.
.7 A location in the technological, educational,
cultural and entertainment heart of the country;
with all the benefits of suburban living-
Then we suggest you consider . I -

LUCII

/

Here's a perfect place
. .. to build your career!
The Columbia Gas System offers you, as
an engineer, the perfect place to grow. The
seven states Columbia serves with natural
gas-Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York,
Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia and
Kentucky-comprise one of the fastest
growing areas in the country. And natural
gas is one of the fastest growing industries
in the U.S.
This growth combination means many
rewarding careers ahead for young men
with ideas.
Variety in your job, promotion from
within, an individualized training program
-tailored to fit you-and liberal em-
ployee benefits, are some of the things
Columbia Gas offers.
If you are a chemical, civil, electrical,
mechanical, welding, petroleum, or gen-
eral engineer, our representative would like
to talk to you during his visit to your

C I G A R E T T E S
STUCK FOR DOUGH?
START STICKLING!I
MAKE $25
We'll pay $25 for every Stickler we
print-and for hundreds more that
never get used! So start Stickling-
they're so easy you can think of dozens
in seconds! Sticklers are simple riddles
with two-word rhyming answers. Both
words must have the same number of
syllables. (Don't do drawings.) Send
'em all with your name, address,
college and class to Happy-doe-Lucky,
Box 67A, Mount Vernon, N. Y.

Wwi -" 11
AT 6
t- 4
- AAGAHATR
Il 3
- - --t-

ASTRONOMERS! Long sunsets make
you impatient? Do you hate standing
around, twirling your telescope, wait-
ing for dark? Cheer up ... now you
can fill that gap! Take outyour Luckies
-and you're in for a Twilight High-
light! Luckies are out of this world
when it comes to taste. That's be-
cause a Lucky is all cigarette . .
nothing but fine, mild, naturally good-
tasting tobacco that's TOASTED to
taste even better. Light up a Lucky
yourself. You'll say it's the best-tast-
ing cigarette you ever smoked!

WHAT IS AN ANGRY BUTCHERS
SSI.
"
JAMES POWELL; ) Cleaver Heaver
ALABAMA

WHAT iS A NOISY POLTICAL MEETING#
VOTE
JAMES BUTLER, Raucous Caucus
BOSTON COLL.

WHAT IS A HOPPED.UP GONDOLAO
MARTHA BACHNER, entCe Menaci
RADCLIFFE

WHAT IS A WOLF IN SHEEP-5 CLOTHING?
:-e-

WHAT IS FAKE CLASSICAL MUSIC9
u,

WHAT IS A HUG IN HOLLAND#
u4

WHAT IS A BAD-NEWS TELEGRAM
i*
r p*

I 1

I I

Ii

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan