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March 06, 1957 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-06

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*1

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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vvrUNm-)"AY, maKuki U. 1957

7

Jordan Land
Of No Past,
Poor Future
By The Associated Press
The Hashemite Kingdom of Jor-
dan is an unlikely land with virtu-
ally no past, only a precarious
present and possibly no future.
The British carved the 30,000-
odd square mile Arab kingdom out
of their Palestine mandate chiefly
to provide a job for their World
War I crony, Abdullah Ibn Al Hus-
sein, and to insure his future
friendship.
But old King Abdullah was cut
down by assassins in 1951, leaving
Jordan with no apparent reason-
geographic, economic or historic-
for existing at all.
No Natural Boundaries
Except for the Jordan River,
which separates it from Israel on
the west, Jordan has no natural'
boundaries. Easterly, it fans out
into the Arabian Desert, its limits
arbitrary and ill-defined.
Jordan's popul Pion is estimated
at more than 11/2 million. Nearly a
million live west of the Jordan, an
area taken over in 1949 from the
Arab-Israel partition of Palestine.
The Palestinians pay scant allegi-
ance to Jordan's young King Hus-
sein.
. Until recently, Jordan lived on
a 30 million dollar handout from
Britain. Hussein gave it up under
Arab pressure. Arab neighbors
agreed to take over the British
role. The big question: Can they
afford it?
Moved Troops In
During the brief Suez, War,
Syria and Saudi Arabia found it
necessary to move troops into Jor-
dan for "protective" purposes.
They're still there, possibly antici-
gating an Arab partition of the
unlikely country.
Probably Jordan, of all the Arab
states, has been hurt most by the
current tense state of the Mideast.
Dulled Fighting Edge
The anti-colonialism, of its
neighbors, directed chiefly against
the British, has deprived Jordan
of its 30 million dollar gratuity
and probably has dulled the sharp
fighting edgg of the Arab Legion.
The Arab-Israeli war of 1948-49,
in which the Legion turned out to
be the Arabs' only effective fight-
ing force, left some 600,000 restless
refugees in Jordan: They're still
there.

BREAKS TRADITION:

l

'U' TV Begins Films on France

by DAVID GELFAND
With a series of shows on France
the University Television Service
breaks its tradition of instructive
television and enters the field of
travelogue and analysis.
Representing a large expenditure
of talent and money, the series,
which is in production, will at-
tempt to give a picture of what
France is today-and why.
The programs are scheduled one
per week on the second half of
the University's Sunday Television
hour.
Producer Al Slote has made a
wealth of filmed material available
COUNSELING:
Questions
Returns
Very High
Campus Counseling committee
received an "amazing return"~ on
their questionnaire sent out in
December, according to Dave
Baad, assistant to the dean of
men.
The usual return for mail ques-
tionnaires is from 40 to 60 per-
cent Baad said, and about 90 per-
cent' were received.
This percentage was well
spread throughout the colleges, he
explained, although the business
administration school only re-
turned 75 percent.
The questionnaires are now be-
ing processed by Survey Research
Center, so they can be put into
percentages, Baad declared. As
soon as this is accomplished the
whole committee will meet to de-
termine the next step.
He expressed the belief that re-
sults wouldn't be available until
the end of next summer.
The Counseling Committee was
established last spring, after Stu-
dent Government Council re-
quested Vice-President for Stu-
dent Affairs James A. Lewis study
the problems brought about by
the expanding university.
The committee, composed of
members of all University Coun-
seling services, will study all pha-
ses and problems of the present
counseling system.

to the series, according to director
Hazen Shumacher.
Slote recently spent two years
in France, studying and traveling.
He has gotten films from, among
others, the mayor of Paris, the
head of the Louvre, and the Min-
ister of Education.
The first show is a general intro-
duction to the people and regions
of France. Later shows will be
dedicated to the city of paris,
French literature, art and music,
and post-war France.
'U' Faculty Takes Part
The University faculty will con-
tribute heavily to the shows on
literature and art. Members of the
Romance Language and Fine Arts
Departments appear along with
interviews of prominent authori-
ties on French subjects.
In addition to faculty contri-
butions and films from outside
sources, the Television Service sent
a camera crew to New York to
interview Frenchmen there.
According to Shumacher, the
crew almost got an interview with
French Foreign Minister Pineau.
A pressing appointment drew him
away before the crew could get set
up.
Always Lost
The camera crew did corner a
pretty Air France Stewardess. Ask-

ed to
Paris,
"They
lost in

compare New York with
the young lady remarked,
are the same. I always get
both."

In a more serious interview, a
prominent perfume manufaceurer
noted that "New York is becoming
a greater cultural center than
Paris. For theater, music and art,
it is surpassing Paris."
In the United Nations Building,
the crew talked to a young French
girl serving as a guide there.
Offering her opinion on the differ-
ence between a Frenchman and
an American male, she remarked,
"One speaks English, the other
speaks French."
High Points
Describing the Series in general,
producer Slote commented that
the introductory show on Paris
and the show on post-war France
should prove to be the high points
in the series.
But a different opinion was of-
fered by Monsieur Jean Carduner,
instructor in the Romance Langu-
ages Department and host for the
programs, who remarked that
something else may prove more
interesting to the listener.
"The high point of the series?"
asked Carduner, tongue in cheek,
"That is easy-it's me."

Panel Discusses Merits
Of'U'Teaching Religion
(Continued from Page 1)_

All Campus
Candidates
Announced
(Continued from Page 1)
Chrysler and Shorr are present
members of SGC. Miss Scruggs,
Assembly president, is an ex-officio
member of the Council.
Literary college presidential can-
didates are: Art Gavin, Mike Jack-
son, Eddie Lubin, and Mark J.
Sabin. Vice-Presidential candidate
is Bernie Rinella.
Connie Hill and Sandi Sol are
running for the literary college
secretaryship. Lois Lamdin and
Jay Newberry are treasurer can-
didates.
Engineering College
In the engineering college, Roger
Frock, Mal Wailker and Bob Ward
are the presidential aspirants.
James Blanchard and Dick Haken
are running for vice-president and
Bob Plaskett for secretary. There
is no candidate for treasurer.
Business administration school
presidential aspirants are Robert
A. Jones and Pete Tillotson. Brad
Ronan and William Viands will
vie for vice-president. John Pay-
son Chapman is the treasurer can-
didate. There is no candidate for
secretary.
Nancy Foren and Laila Sadi are
School of Education presidential
candidates. David A. Kamchi is
running for vice-president and
Evelyn Field for secretary. There
is no candidate for treasurer.
Eight Candidates
Eight candidates are running
for the Union Student Director
positions. They are:
Art Gavin, '58; Jim Gold, '59;
John Hubbard, '59; Chuck Kriser,
'58BAd; Roy Lave, '57E; Don Mick,
'58E; Robert L. Stahl, '58; and
Sandy Wolf, '58.
For 10 JiHop Committee posi-
tions, 23 candidates have been an-
nounced. All are sophomores and,
unless noted, of the literary col-
lege:
Mike Adell, Robert Arnove, Zack
Athanas, Joanne Bleechler, Al
Bell, Jim Champion, Don Colwell,
Tom Creed, Roger L. Duerksen,
Ralph Frederick, Lydia Genthe,
Denton Hanford, '59E; Liz Hoff-
man, Dan Jaffe, Sally Klinesteker,
Joel Koenig, Arv Philippart, Stew-
art L. Randall, Stan Rosenquist,
Steve Schwartb, Robert E. Stahl,
'58E, Peter Van Haften, and Tony
Weiler, '59NR.
Publications Board
Candidates for the three student
seats on the Board in Control of
Student Publications are Gordon
Black, '57; Eugene Hartwig, '58L;
David Kessel, Grad.; and David
Silver, '57BAd.
Candidates for the single seat'on
the Board in Control of Intercol-
legiate Athletics, as nominated by
the board itself, without the stu-
dents' petitioning, are John Herrn-
stein, '59Ed, and Cyrus Hopkins,
'59.
Campaigning for all elective ofil-
ces begins Saturday.
I ORPHEUM

I

*IFIE&Dr

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
1 1:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
USED CARS
48 NASH under 50,000 miles. Clean for
its age, overhauled motor, good trans-
portation at $125. 2008 Day St. or
call NO 2-8576. )N106
USED CAR SPECIALS
1955 Ford Thunderbird; all red, white
wall tires, radio & heater, power
seats, 8,000 miles. Two tops, conti-
nental kit. This car is like new.
$2545
1952 Chevrolet tudor; grey, radio &
heater, in excellent condition. $495
1950 Plymouth tudor; perfect transpor-
tation $195.
JIM WHITE, Inc.
Your Chevrolet Dealer
Open 'til 9 P.M. Daily, Sat. 'til 1 P.M.
2 Big Lots-Cor. Washington and First
Sts. and Cor. Ashley and Liberty Sts.
Phones NO 2-5000, NO 3-6495, NO 3-3321
)N165
HELP WANTED
BOLL WEEVIL JAZZ BAND needs tra-
ditional piano player. Call Dan Ha-
vens evenings. NO 2-3422. )H96
CAMP STAFF in Chelsea Wanted: wa-
terfront, small craft, tripping, nurse,
clerical. NO 3-2002, NO 8-7033. )H95
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part-
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company.
Phone NO 8-9382. )H20
REAL ESTATE
THE
BUTTS & SWISHER CO.
REALTORS
FOR ANN ARBOR.WOODS
(Washtenaw at Stadium)
Models Open Daily 10-8 )R1
j FOR RENT
TWO ROOM SUITE with sink. Also
single. 917 E. Huron. )C84
WANTED: A fourth male student for a
five room apartment near campus.
Phone after 7 P.M. NO 2-7394. )C83
ONE BLOCK from campus. Large 3
room apartment. Also one man to
share apartment with three, same
location. Phone NO 2-1443. )C74
TRANSPORTATION
TRANSPORTATION: MIAMI-- Fly
round trip! Wolverine Special $79.61
plus tax. Will leave on April 5 and
return Sunday, April 14. Call RICH-
ARD'S TRAVEL AGENCY, NO 2-7414.
)G29
RENT a clean car
Daily, Weekly or Hourly Rates
Reservations made anywhere
Rent A Car
V*Z 514 E. Washington St.
Phone NO 3-4156
)G30
BUSINESS SERVICES

FOR SALE
RARE VIOLINS
AND BOWS
ALL ACCESSORIES, STRINGS,
REPAIRS
MADDY MUSITC
508 E. Williams
NO 3-3223
)B74
HI F1
Special Sale Package:
Gerrard Turntable .,. .....,.$ 32.50
Reconton Cartridge ....... $ 23.40
Bell Amplifier ....... $ 49.95
Electro-Voice ...........$ 33.00
Regular Price................$138.85
SALE PRICE .................$120.00
Audio Supply Laboratories
334 Nickels Arcade
NO 2-7767 NO 2-9425
)B259
MARCH SPECIAL
Grafiex "35" Kit
Camera Case & Flash
Reg. $99.50 Now $89.50
THE QUARRY, INC.
320 S. State St. NO 3-1991
more than just a camera shop
)B247
FOR SALE: Exakta-Vx 35mm. camera,
Tessar 3.5 lens, case, copy lenses,
extension tubes. $130. Excellent buy,
used on University project. Call Mr.
Bank, Ext. 2109 during day or NO 2-
5397 evenings. )B258
MEN'S SUIT - medium-gray flannel,
size 38 long, price $20. Inquire: 423
Adams, West Quad. )B256

PETS & SUPPLIES
NEW SHIPMENT of plants. Also tropi-
cal fish, aquariums and supplies.
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM
328 E. Liberty NO 3-0224
)T5
Parakeets - Tropical Fish
Your Garden Center, 215 S. Fifth Ave,
)T4
ALL COLORS - baby parakeets and
breeders. Canaries. Baby cockatiel
cages. 305 W. Hoover. NO 2-2403. )T3
AKC PUPPIES-Chihuahuas, Toy Fox
Terriers, Bostons, Cockers. Stud
Service. 965 Parkwood, Ypst. HU 3-
0990. )T1
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Ten week old tan West African
Boer Hound, vicinity of Liberty and
S. Division. Contact Apt. No. 1, 307
S. Division. )A101
PERSONAL
NOW is the time for all A&D students
to subscribe to Architectural Forum
at the half price rate of $2.75. Offer
expires soon; phone Student Periodi-
cal now or tonight. NO 2-3081. )F163
GIRL WANTED to share 7 room house;
private bedroom. Attractively fur-
nished and close to campus. Call
NO 5-6785. )F14
Dressmaking
Tailoring, restyling. Will do fitting in
your home or mine. Experienced,
minimum charges. NO 5-6370.
Pick-up and Delivery
NEW LOCATION MARGARET SHOP-
Uniforms and furs, up to 50% off.
Fur tricks for spring styling. 518 E.
Liberty, NO 5-5729. )F142
DRESSMAKER
Mending -Alterations. Ph. NO 2-9541.
)FJ37
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted, $18, or new silk.,
shawl collar, $25. Write to Michaels
Tailoring Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit,
Michigan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. )FI
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED
STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our busi-
ness. Atlas tires, batteries
and accessories. Warranteed
& guaranteed. See us for
the best price on new tires
--also used tires. Road serv-
ice - mechanic on duty.
Open Mon. through Sat.
7:30 A.M.-10 P.M.
Sunday 9 A.M.-8 P.M.

I

that every church willing to do
so should pay the salary of a Junior
instructor to teach courses in that
particular denomination, "if class-
room space is available." Sects un-
able to bear the expense would
receive help from the state or
other churches.
The panel also discussed the
effect of the University environ-
ment and curriculum on religious
faith. Miss Scruggs said tradi-
tional faith is weakened, and a
questioning attitude appears, due
to the courses taken in college. She
felt that a student's home and
church background is often inade-
quate for answering the questions
raised in classes.
Religious Skepticism
Marks took an opposing view,
saying that religious skepticism
on campuses, like political radical-
ism, was largely a myth. "Deeply-
rooted beliefs brought from home
are confirmed in college," he said.
"Students generally end up where
they started, regardless of fallacies
in their faith which may be ex-
posed."
Trost divided students into three
groups, saying that those who
A *

come with firm, well-grounded be-
liefs are strengthened in them
whilenominally religious students
and those believing in a "fire-and-
brimstone" God generally desert
their faiths.
Slobodkin regarded the profes-
sors role in the student's religious
experience as that of a "cold
shower," dousing the'students with
what he believes to be true. Marks
took exception to this, calling the
University environment a "luke-
warm bath" instead.
Holmer Lecture
The conference continues today
with lectures by Prof. Paul L.
Holmer ofhthe philosophy depart-
ment of the University of Minne-
sota on "Can we be both Intelli-
gent and Religious?" at 4:15 p.m.
in Auditorium A, Angell Hall. Capt.
Roy R. Marken, district chaplain
of the Ninth Naval District, will
speak at 3 p.m. today in West
Conference Room of Rackham
Building on "Moral Leadership."
A lecture by Said Ramadan has
been added to tomorrow's rconfer-
ence schedule. Ramadan, secre-
tary-general of the Islamic Con-
gress in Jerusalem, will discuss
"Islam: A Code of Life" at 7:30
p.m. in Lane Hall.

9 x 12 COTTON
$29.95

RUGS

Many varieties of colors to choose from
SMITH's FLOOR COVERING
207 E. Washington
NO 3-5536
Open Monday evening until 8:30
)B251
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords - $7.25;
socks, 39c; shorts, 69c; military sup-
plies.

5AMS STORE
Phone NO 3-0800
122 East Washington

)B205 i

SWEET DREAM
Cookies and cakes
For a delightful snack
Everyone needs something
Before hitting the sack.
CAMPBELL & SON BAKERY
219 N. Main NO 8-9880
Order now -- we deliver
)B233
FEDERAL 3% by 4% enlarger and
complete dark roam outfit. Call
NO 2-5092 after 7 P.M. )B255
Hi Fi Studio
Largest Inventory of HI FI components
in the area.

HEYHI F FANS!
',
* d" "
Here Is a Bargain !
familiar sounds of the U. of M.
now available on a 5513 rpm record
AT COST
includes recordings from
*Glee Club Concerts
A J-Hop dance
Speech by Harlan Hatcher
' Athletic event commentaries
{ Bells of Burton Tower
* Many other familiar sounds
Yours at manufacturer's cost of 75c
with your subscription to the
MICHIGANENSIAN
BUY YOURS TODAY
at the Student Publications Bldg.
420 Maynard Street

1220 So. University

NO 8-918
)JOS

9 P.M. u J2[I

DIAL
NO 2-2513

I

Authorized
Dyna-Kit
Electro-Voice
AR-1
Colloro
Rek-O-Kit
Pickering
Jim Lansing

dealer for:
David Bogen
University
Janzen
Garrard
Fairchild
Fisher
McIntosh

...r,
~a.. _eo

. osy e
* SPECIAL RED CARPET
PREVIEW TONIGHT
: :of a new Paramount
Picture in VistaVision
and Technicolor!
Already acclaimed as:
"Best picture
of the year !- General Federation
of Women's Clubs .,-::";"; L:

PURCHASE

FROM

PURCHASE

Come at 7 or 9 P.M.
EDDIE FISHER
in "BUNDLE
Shown Before and

Our Regular Show
DEBBIE REYNOLDS
OF JOY"
After Preview

' ,towr. Siepi and all-star cast. Foingier
conductor.Eastman Color, 1Hiuh Fidelity Sound.
FRIDAY
"MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY"
Chas. Laughton Clark Gable

Argus C-3 color slide camera with
case and flash. Used. $32.30.
PURCHASE
CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
)J54
GRADUATE STUDENT from Spain,
wishes to tutor or teach Spanish.
Call NO 3-5957. )J56
WASHINGS-Also Ironing separately.
Specialize in cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and deli-
very. Phone NO 2-9020. )J23

1217& 1317 So. University
NO 2-9595 )B253
PORTABLE TV
RCA PHILCO MAGNAVOX
$125 up
MUSIC CENTER
Just West of Hill Auditorium
)B254
ROOMS FOR RENT
ON CAMPUS-Single room. Phone NO
8-9622 after 5 P.M. )D64
NEED MALE ROOMMATE to share 5
room apt. with 3 others. Call NO 3-
2060. )D63
TWO LARGE double rooms for men
students. $7. 406 Packard across from
South Quad. Call NO 3-4096. )D54

For the Best in
Tires, Batter es, and Service
see
"HOB" GAINSLEY
SERVICE
So. University &--orest
)SM0
TIRE SALE
Prices slashed
Big trade-in for used tires
Fully Guaranteed
GOLDEN'S SERVICE
featuring STANDARD Products
601 Packard -- NO 8-9429
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

==

MMMPM!M1

II

'II

I

I

DIAL NO 2-3136
The winner of an
Academy Award
Nomination for his
starring role in "Giant"
in another great portrayal

South Quad. Call NO 3-4096. )D54

I1

to attend a series of three evenings on issues of basic concern
to you, the college student. The series is concerned with,
"RELIGION PRACTICES IN OUR TIMES." The first
discussion will be devoted to "Dietary Laws" and their place
in modern living. It will be given by RABBI JACOB CHIN-
ITZ, congregation Ahavas Achim, Detroit. It will be held
tonight at 8:00.

.

I

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 HILL STREET

*THUR. MARCH 7
FRI. MARCH 8
SAT. MARCH 9
*SUN. MARCH10
at 2:30 and 8:30
* Cheaper for students

4

I

I

rAr. Ad4 ;6aisM~qAum;h4u

,I

or

-1

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DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH and THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENI

UNIYERSAL-NTiRNATIONAL Pnst

English translation by Josef Blatt
and

m- sfAnmG lA A DTu A u V r D

I

e

I I EMOTTION PITTRF:IN m TR . A T. r n CITI' I

I

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