100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 28, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28,1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE :FIVE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1 9 5 7 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE JIVE

Students To Consider
CloigHour Change

Acmaj Cap c, Hospital H
By SARAH S. RUBENSTEIN |

By SUE RAUNHEIM
What do students think about
the proposed change in women's
hours?
It has been brought to the at-
tention of the Women's Judiciary
Council by the Student Govern-
ment Council Calendaring Com-
mittee that many problems have
arisen because of 1:30 a.m. late
permission nights.
In order to solve the problem
of an insufficient number of week-
ends for groups petitioning for
late permissions, Judic has referred
this question to the individual
housing units.
1 a.m. Closing
This new plan would mean that
Friday nights still have a 12:30
a.m. per., but on Saturday nights
students would have an extra half
hour. There would be no more
1:30 a.m. lat.. permissions except
on special occasions such as J-Hop
and Michigras.
Some all-campus activities have
found that there are so many
small parties and dances scheduled
on these late per nights that at-
tendance is seriously impaired.
Many Favor Plan
Sue Arnold, president of the
League, is in favor of the proposed
plan. She feels that "there should
be a generally later closing hour
on the weekend." According to
Miss Arnold, "Students, when they
reach college age, are old enoubh
to stay out late."
Miss Arnold added that there
are approximately twice as many
groups requesting late pers that
Two Groups
Plan Dances
Spring Prelude
"Spring Prelude," annual dance
of the engineering school, will be
presented from 9:30 p.m, to 1 a.m.
tomorrow evening at the League.
The theme will be portrayed by
decorations picturing both a snowy
winter and the perpetual rains of
spring.
Piano renditions of Dixieland
music played by Chuck Rasch may
be heard during intermission.
Tickets for the semi-formal
dance, presented by the Slide Rule
Ball committee and open to all
students, are on sale en the Diag-
onal and under the Engineering
Arch,
Crimson Carousel
"Crimson Carousel" is the theme
of the Assembly Ball, to be held
from 9 to 1 a.m. Saturday, March
16 in the League Ballroom. f
The coed-bid dance will feature
the bands of Don Kenney and Bob
Duprey.
Tickets for the dance may be
purchased at the Undergraduate
Office of the League. They will also
be on sale in the corridors of the
women's dorms after Tuesday, and
on the Diagonal and at the Engi-
neering Arch Monday to Thursday.

get them, thus by having a con-
sistent 1 a.m. per on Saturdayr
nights every organization would
have a late night in that it would
be later than Friday night.
Can Eliminate Late Pers
Art Epker, member of the Stu-
dent Activities Building Board
feels this plan is a "good idea."I
He says, "most events could bel
handled very nicely by eliminating
1:30 a.m's."
Don Medalie, '56 Musket Chair-
man, is more in favor of keeping
the status quo. He feels, "not much
goes on after 12:30 a.m. in Ann
Arbor so he'd rather have a 12:30
a.m. closing hour .and keep the
1:30 a.m. for special occasions.
Retain Status Quo
There were many students who
felt that the system as it now
stands is more desirable because
the rarity of a 1:30 a.m. is some-
thing to look forward to. They
felt that Ann Arbor is geared to
this system and there isn't any-
thing one could do to 1 a.m. that
could not as easily be done to
12:30 a.m.
This problem has been discussed
and subjected to a vote in the
housing units and results are in
the process of being tabulated. If
there is a close vote, the Women's
Judiciary Council will make the
important decision.

BURO-CATS - Buro-cats will
hold a mass meeting at 4 p.m. to-
day in the League. Women inter-
ested in signing up are welcome
to attend.
* * *
INTERNATIONAL CENTER -
The weekly social hour will be
held from 4 to 6 p.m. today in
the recreation room of the In-
ternational Center. The social
hour is open to all students.
,. * * .
JUNIORS-Petitioning for ju-
nior positions in the League will
close at 5 p.m. today.
* * *
HILLELZAPOPPIN' - A mass
meeting for this year's annual
skit has been called for 7:30 p.m.
today at Hillel.
COFFEE HOUR - The philo-
sophy department will hold the
first of eight Union-sponsored de-
partmental coffee hours from 4
to 6 p.m. today in the Terrace
Rooms of the Union.
SCROLL SCHOLARSHIP-Pe-
titioning opens tomorrow for
scholarships offered by Scroll,
senior women's honorary. Peti-
tions may be picked up in the Un-
dergraduate Office of the League.
Petitioning closes Monday, March
18. Any junior woman is eligible.
In choosing the recipients, need,
activities and scholarship will be
considered. Applicants should
sign for an interview when re-1
turning the petition.1

Many people today are asking
why Johnny can't read, but a
group in Ann Arbor is also con-
cerned about why Johnny can't,
integrate.
The Children's Psychiatric Hos-
pital, treats emotionally disturbed
children. The 75 bed residential
treatment center has been in op-
eration for only one year.
Gaily Decorated
Gaily colored poles of red and
blue support the long cement,
overhead "canopy" leading out

Ips Disturbed Children
tients, is initially seen here. Plans The rooms are better equipped
for his treatment, if it is needed, than the average school room.
are outlined in the Clinic. Tables and chairs replace desks
Some youngsters require psy-
chotherapy on an out-patient ba- and lend an informal atmosphere.
sis. This means that the child Paints and brushes are in one
continues to live at home and room, tools in another and books
comes to the Hospital once a in a third. An auditorium is
week where he is seen by his phy-
sician. Approximately 40 boys and equipped for both movies and lec-
girls are receiving out-patient StOres.
psychotherapy. Sports Offered

Johnny's Stay
Johnny, however, is an in-
patient. In the course of the nextI

A gymnasium and swimming
pool delight Johnny during his
recreation time. :n the summer,
he plays baseball outside behind

from the entrance of the sevenI
level brick building. Inside, the few weeks, he attends school, sees the Hospital
lobby is furnished with comfort-his doctor, has occupational ther- with the oth
able chairs and couches. apy, and participates in recrea- All meal
In the center of thewaiting tional activities. style. He ep
area isha miniature table where Johnny soon becomes accus- with some s
children amuse themselves with tomed to his new surroundings. more of a h
toys and puzzles until they see He rooms with another boy al- While Job
the otoys a pzthough some of his neighbors by therapist
the docto. have two companions. At the end workers, an
Let's choose one of the little of his corridor, is the recreation sonnel, his
through his treatment. From this area. Here he and his friends can guidance fc
point on, the boy shall be known play games or look at television. This guidan
only as Johnny. For a few hours each day, he the Hospital
Firsy ApsoJntney.1goes to one of the classrooms in in their hor
First Appointment the Hospital. Only about six pu- When Joh
This is Johnny's first appoint- pils are in a class at one time. In will be able
ment. He was referred to CPH by this way, each can receive indivi- "get along"
the family physician, but courts, dual help. ily, his com
schools, social agencies, and oth-
er departments of University Hos-
pital could have been the source
of reference. Dr. Stuart M. Finch,
the director of the hospital, gives
the first interview.
After the interview, a diagnosis
is made in the Out-patient Clinic.
Johnny, like the other young pa-

I and joins in picnics
her patients.
s are served family
ats in his own ward
taff members. CPH is
home than a hospital.
hnny is being treated
s, psychiatrists, social
d other trained per-
parents are receiving
or his readjustment.
ce is given either at
I or at a social agency
me town.
nny returns home, he
e to read better and
better with his fam-
panions and himself.

/11
\.

the

"over everything"
coat
Justin McCarty's newest duster coat has
plenty of exit-interest with a buttoned back
belt, gentle fullness, and casual raglan

This Is Pat

.; J
f
.
.
.r ;
:: .:
.
?,
y
S;
'. .
ยข..:.; >

t '

sleeves. In front the coat hangs
straight. The fabric, a rayon-acetate
blend in a homespun linen-look.
Flax. Misses' sizes.

. 22.95
(including matching hat)
MAIN AT LIBERTY ANN ARBOR
Only the finest quality at prices that are fair

"CDE" A REGISTERED TRADEHMARK. COPYRGHT 1957 THE COA:COLA COMPANY,
Sociollogy
Spin a platter. ... have some chatter...
and sip that real great taste of Coke.
Sure, you can have a party without
Coca-Cola-but who wants to!
oI'
SIGN OF GOOD TASTE

In her miracle
3-for-the-money purchase
What do you wear in the Spring?
Khaki Bermudas?
You have them here!
A slim khaki skirt you can live in?
You have it here!
A khaki blazer, all tie silk lined?
You have that, too !
Wear them as a suit or each one
separately . . . a miracle outfit for
Sizes 7 to 15 29.95
And You Can Charge It at
FOR TOWN AND COLLEGE
302 South State Street
Use Daily Classifieds!

a
3

SAS..
LO W
LOVELY
$ 95
w ~ s
It's that wonderful VINER con-
stictionff- so sensiti~ve to the

ANN ARBOR COCA COLA BOTTLING
..
"oninet hesuae
s avetise n eenen

CO.

..:...AW% . :4',V ............ ... A.,t r~,.. .a M:"r,.:e...i:'1v: 'r~c:": ...;,.."~.

r.
cis
F
000V

~pci PW'cha'4e!
FIRST QUALITY NYLON HOSIERY
IN PROPORTIONED LEG SIZES
$ 108
3 PAIRS-3.10
Full-fashioned 60 gauge, 15 denier nylons
in short, medium and long lengths
Here's wonderful news for your spring stocking
wardrobe, and for your budget, too! Stock up now
on these sheer full-fashioned and seamless nylons,
with their precision leg-and-foot-fit . . . value-
priced to save you money. Ideal for gifts, too.
Beige, light beige, taupe.

.:;:::::: . t :rr.:v ::r:r:S <::":.v ::: r f- .+ ..v:"::.":.

#1,

S A N D L E R OF BOSTON'S BONGO ... te
The accent's on the contoured sole and heel, soc
throat, slim toe, double-beat trim . . . and the t
The pump for your social whirl, girl ... hurry! A

w

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan