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February 28, 1957 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-28

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,W4 1

PAGE BIB!

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28,1957

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1957

'M' Icers Stage Late Season Spurts
In Previous Five Championship Bids

By BRUCE BENNETT
(This is the first in a series of two
articles recalling Michigan's hockey
exploits in past years.)
The scramble for playoff berths
in the Western Intercollegiate
Hockey League is going right
down to the last week again this
year and, true to past form, Mich-
igan is in the thick of the battle.
The Wolverines are currently
tied for third place with their
arch rivals of last year, Michigan
Tech, at 101/2 points apiece. They
trail Colorado College by six and
one-half and North Dakota by
one and one-half.
Since those teams finishing
first and second are the only ones
invited to the NCAA tournament
next month, Michigan must fin-
ish strongly next week when it
engages North Dakota and Michi-
gan Tesch in four games if it is to
have the opportunity of defending
its NCAA title.
Nothing New To Michigan
Facing such a challenge to gain
a league champiofiship or play-
off berth is nothing new to Viv
Heyliger's teams. For in each of
the past five seasons the Wolver-
ines have needed a late season
spurt to achieve their goal.

Back in 1952, Michigan was
having t r o u b 1 e shaking the
shackles of third place in the
newly formed Midwestern Colle-
giate Hockey League (MCHL).
With five games left it trailed
Colorado College and Denver in
the standings.
Facing elimination from a play-
off berth after dropping a 5-3
decision to league-leading Color-
ado College in the first of a two
game series, the Wolverines
bounced back the next night to
whip the Tigers, 7-6, on Ron Mar-
tinson's goal in overtime.
Coaches Vote For Wolverines
Sparked by this win, Michigan
streaked to victories in its last
four games to wind up in a second
place tie with Denver. Subse-
quently, a four to one vote by the
league coaches sent them to Col-
orado Springs instead of the Pio-
neers.
The 1953 season was much the
same story, only this time it was
Minnesota that plagued the Wol-
verines. Then, late in the season,
Heyliger made a move that was
destined to affect the fortunes of
his team for the next two years.
Forced by injuries and ineligi-
bilities to reshuffle his lineup, he

came up with the forward line
of George Chin, Doug Mullen and
Pat Cooney. This trio turned out
to be one of the greatest scoring
combinations in Michigan history,
ranking with the feared Neil Cel-
ley-Johnny Matchefts-Gil Bur-
ford combination that rewrote the
record books in the 1951 season.
Minnesota had clinched a tie
for first place during the final
week by defeating Michigan State
twice and the pressure was on
the Wolverines as they squared
off with Michigan Tech.
But with Cooney scoring four
goals, Chin three and Mullen two,
plus four by Matchefts, then a se-
ProeTennis
Jack Kramer and hisbprofes-
sional tennis tour will be com-
ing to Ann Arbor on March 26.
Featured in his tour will be
Pancho Gonzales and Ken
Rosewall. The matches will be
held in the Ann Arbor High
School gym.
During the past two years
Gonzales has been the steadiest
performer on the tour. He has
beaten Rosewall, Pancho Se-
gura, and Kramer.
nior, the Wolverines rang up 18
goals in one of the top offensive
performances in history at the
Coliseum as they hung 8-3 and
10-2 defeats on the northern
Michigan school. This gained
them a tie with the Gophers for
first place in the MSHL.
(The second article in the series
follows the Wolverines as they polish
off great Minnesota and Michigan
Tech teams in recent years.)

Undefeated Swimmers!
Place Perfect Records,
On Line Against OSU

IL lu

ene from th
S DE LINES
by Dick Cramer

thither Pro Sports?

Teams Vie'
On Saturday
By AL WINKELSTEIN
The Wolverine natators, Michi-
gan's onlyunbeaten team, will put
their perfect record on the line'
against the toughest opponent, the
Buckeyes from Ohio State.
Fresh from their impressive vic-
tory against Indiana and Michigan
State last weekend, the swimmers
will attempt to do what has been
been virtually impossible for the
last few years, beat the seemingly
invincible men from Columbus.
Ohio State's record reads much
like the Yankee's record in base-
ball. The last time the Buckeyes
suffered a defeat in dual meet
competition was in 1955 when the
Wolverines nosed them out by a
single point.
Since 1938, the Buckeyes have
taken 12 Big Ten championships,
and since 1949, they have a streak
of eight straight Conference titles.!
In the last three years they have
won the national collegiate cham-
pionship three times.
Last year Ohio State humbled
the Michigan swimmers at Colum-
bus by a count of 57-36. The Buck-
eyles could have taken the meet
by an even larger score, but they
held back most of their top swim-!
mers from the last few events.
However, Michigan, with its ex-
cellent group of sophomores, is a
vastly improved team from last
year's aggregation. So far this sea-
son they have successfully met
every challenge. Most experts 1lg-

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Masonic Temple - Tickets at Grinnell's - Detroit

DICK KIMBALL-Michigan's top diver will carry much of the
burden against the Buckeyes in this Saturday's meet. If he can
crack through the Ohio State diving monopoly, the Wolverines'
chances will be greatly enhanced.

ured that with a young team, this
would be a building season, but
Tickets
Tickets for this Saturday's
swmiming meet against Ohio
State will go on sale at 12:30
on Saturday. The price is 60
cents for students and a dol-
lar for the general public. The
meet starts at 2:30.
the team has come along much
faster than was expected.
The team surpiresd most experts
with tremendous wins over Indi-

ana, Iowa, and Michigan State.
They have shown great improve-
ment, and reached their season's
peak last Monday against the
Spartans.
The Buckeyes' record this season
is not one to be lightly pushed
aside either. They hold very im-
pressive wins over the Hoosiers
and the Spartans, and will be out
to extend its victims to include
Michigan.
The Buckeyes have the best div-
ing combination in the nation.
Two of their three divers were
members of the American Olympic
team, while the third is the NCAA
champion.

Read and Use

ODaly

Classifieds

PROFESSIONAL sports, generally among our most conservative
institutions, may soon have to take some bold new steps if they
hope to survive their latest and stiffest challenge.
A long-time threat to the pros has finally materialized with
the Supreme Court's decision that all sports, with the present excep-
tion of baseball, are subject to antitrust laws. The judicial fiction
that sports are not business and that they do not engage in "inter-
state commerce" has been destroyed in the latest ruling.
While baseball was specifically exempted because of legal prece-
dence in its favor, quick Congressional action is expected to wipe
out this advantage for the diamond sport. Soon all sports will pro-
bably be considered liable to antitrust litigation.
Chief victim of the new ruling seems to be the present backbone
of continuity in pro sports - the reserve clause. This is the section
of professional athletes' contracts that gives their teams the option
to retain their services even after the contracts expire. The clause
prohibits players from jumping to other teams after the end of their
present contracts.
At the present time, if Robin Roberts could get more money from
the New York Yankees than from his present club, the Philadelphia
Phils, he cannot deal with the Yanks. He must either agree to terms
with the Phlis, get Philadelphia to trade him - or sell their option
rights-to the Yankees, or quit baseball. His baseball talents are the
exclusive property of the Phila-
delphia Phillies.
Now the reserve clause itself
is quite legal. Antitrust laws do
not bar it.
What would be illegal in base-
ball's - and all other profession-
al sports' reserve clauses - is
that a person cannot make base-
ball his business without accept-
ing the clause. All of organizedf$
baseball has combined to restrain
trade in the sense that all teams
recognize and use the reserve
clause. A player who does not
wish to include the clause in his
contract has nowhere to go ex-
cept out of the sport.
With professional sports now
considered interstate commerce,
therefore, Robin Roberts can
move over to the Yankees if they
are the highest bidder. ROBIN ROBRTS
The implications are great. A . . . to the highest bidder?
strong advantage is given to the
most wealthy teams in each sport. Whatever players they want they
can get by outbidding the poorer clubs.
Presently, the rich teams can buy up the best prospects among
the new players. But at least players that develop for the financially
disadvantaged teams are still the property of those teams and do
not gravitate, once they've become established, to the most affluent
teams.
This "emancipation proclamation" is not the great boon to
players that it seems. As fewer and fewer teams gain control over
an increasing proportion of the best players and as the poorer clubs
see less and less hope of ever recovering, the "have-not" teams will
be forced out of business. .
Even the richest club cannot last forever as all its competition
disappears. It can't play games in a one-team league. The result
would be a dead sport.
How can the pro sports escape their dilemma? Don't forget
that any joint action will be just the thing that antitrust laws pro-
hibit.
It may be that sports, which have kept government at bay for
so long, may have to turn to federal authority as its eventual savior.
Big Business ...
IT IS MORE realistic to have 'professional sports recognized as
interstate business - of major proportions.
But once the sports are viewed as business, Congress can legiti-
mately move to help them just as it has aided other businesses that
cannot survive ecessive competition.
The aid can be just that Congress will exempt sports from cover-
age under antitrust laws. But this leaves the inadequacies of the
present system untouched and untouchable, even though it allows
the sports to regulate their own competition.
A much more radical, but probably better solution would be for
legislation that would define the extent of monopoly allowed in
sports. Or if Congressional law would be too inflexible, a federal
sports commission is certainly within the realm of possibility. Under
proper management this would be no more oppressive to sports than
the Interstate Commerce Commission has been to railroads.
Government action seems inevitable for the solution of pro-
fessional sports' new challenge.
PRO BASKETBALL?:
Pistons May Call Kramer

r

6

, MUNNOWAMMMISMO

I'- f

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
in
YENEZU E LV E A
with
CREOLE PETROLEUM CORPORATION
An Affiliate of Standard Oil Co. (N.J.)
Representatives of Creole will be on the campus on
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to interview unmarried graduates with majors in
PETROLEUM, CHEMICAL, MECHANICAL and
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
SEE YOUR PLACEMENT DIRECTOR
FOR INTERVIEW SCHEDULES

,p I je...

JOHN NARY

II

1'

ByCARL RISEMAN
John Narcy, Captain of Michi-
gan's swimming team, is a self-
taught diver.
What is more remarkable, the
Gary, Indiana, athlete won the
Indianastatehigh school diving
championship without the benefit
of any coaching!
Played Football
"I was a football player in my
senior year in high school and was
very interested in diving," Narcy

remarked. "But Tolleston High
School did not have a swimming
or a diving team."
In order to enter the state meet,
a competitor was required to com-
pete in at least one dual meet.
Narcy, Dick Hill, now a football
player for Michigan, and another
of Narcy's teammates swam,
against another high school in a
'dual meet' to make Narcy eligible
for the state meet.
i'

Narcy began to become inter-
ested in diving while lifeguarding
for a YMCA camp in the summer
of his junior year in high school.
Narcy and a friend of his helped
each other learn how to dive by
comparing diving form.
Indiana Champion
By winning the Indiana diving
championship, Narcy had new
fields opened to him. An athletic
scholarship enabled him to come
to the University of Michigan.
"When John first came out for
practice,", Bruce Harlan, Michi-
gan's diving coach relates, "I did
not think that he would make the
team. But he practiced hard and
finally acquired the needed confi-
dence at the Big Ten Meet last
year where he finished sixth."
John is a physical education
major and wants to be a high
school coach after he gets his de-
gree this June.

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DETROIT -- Ron Kramer will
consider playing pro basketball
with the Pistons when they move
from Fort Wayne into Detroit
next winter if offered the chance,
a Detroit newspaper reported yes-
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Kramer primarily wants to play
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pro football following his June
graduation. Because he is still
competing as a collegiate, he has
not chosen between the two foot-
ball clubs bidding for him, the
Green Bay Packers in the National
Football League and the Hamilton
team in the Canadian Big Four.
However, Kramer indicated that
if it was possible he would like to
continue his basketball career if
it would not prevent him from
playing professional football.
The Pistons have hinted that
they will draft Kramer at the pro
basketball meeting, although un-
til now it was assumed that Kra-
mer would decline their offer and
the Pistons would merely get pub-
licity out of it.
"I don't know if I could make
the team," Kramer said, "but I'd
like to play in Detroit.
Kramer, although only 6'4" Is
one of the best rebounders in the
Big Ten. In Michigan's 12 games
in Big Ten competition this sea-
son, Kramer has an average of 14.3
points per game.

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