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January 06, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-01-06

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 6,1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PArF. rIVr.I

SUNDAY, JANUARY 6,1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILI USA t±W

&XriY.A I WI v .y4

i

SPEAKING..
OFF THE CUFF
FOR WHOSE BENEFIT? By Virginia Robertson
Women's Editor
MAYBE IT'S because I only have a few more weeks of school left--
I'm not sure...
4 But it certainly seems that rules and regulations are too all-im-
portant around here. Each person fits himself to the inflexibilities
of this institution, and any exceptions would most assuredly mean
the collapse of institution.
Take, for instance, the situation in the men's and women's
dormitories, the most obvious places where rules are applied. Jam-
packed full of students they are. Then, more and more are being
added to conditions already almost unbearable. And will "authorities"
let students who wish to leave and can find available University
housing elsewhere "break their contracts?" Of course not. It would
mean an exception to the rule and this just isn't done.
In my own housing group, they're finishing a new addition and
will have room for six extra women next semester. We would like
to house some of our sophomore nurse pledges who will not otherwise
be able to live in the house, or some of our juniors who will be able
to stay in the house for only a short time. But the University will
probably assign six other women to these vacancies. I can certainly
see how it could be difficult for new persons to move into such an
integrated situation as a sorority.
'Things will undoubtedly come up in which the new women won't
be- able to participate, such as sorority singing, meetings, and other
activities. To new students who have just arrived at the University,
this might be a difficult situation to encounter. And it certainly looks
as if those in charge care more for upholding rules than for individual
considerations.
A friend who lives in one of the large dormitories told me that if
a person loses or temporarily misplaces a meal ticket, she absolutely
must buy another one. Even if her housemother vouches for her right
to be let in the dining room, and even if the person taking tickets,
and everyone else around know she lives there and is entitled to a meal
ticket, she has to buy another one, at 50 cents a throw. Perhaps
these situations aren't of the most vital concern, but they ;are just
a sampling of the many instances when rules rather than the indi-
vidual seems to be the most important concern.
Some say things can't be worked out to everyone's advantage
and liking because the University is so large, but wouldn't it be best
to make any and every improvement possible? Authorities are, after
all, usually pretty considerate. Is this really something we must
necessarily sacrifice when attending a large University? -

Tour of We
By Glee Clu
The University Men's Glee Club
will tour the West Coast from
Seattle, Wash., to San Diego, Calif.
during spring vacation.
The tour will be an outstanding
part of the Club's 97th season. The
Club will give other concerts in
various Michigan communities.
The 60-odd members of the Glee
Club are students, graduate and
undergraduate, at the University.
The officers and managers arej
responsible for enforcing attend-
ance at thehbi-weekly practices,
managing the concert tour, and
taking care of all other Glee Club
activities.
Tryouts Selected
Filling the gaps in membership
due to graduation, are the best
tryouts. Each fall the prospective
members are rated on the merits
of their voices, and then on their
personalities.
Interviewing the tryouts is Prof.
Phillip A. Duey, conductor of the
Men's Glee Club and Prof. of
Voice. This fall Prof. Duey re-
turned from a year of study in
Europe.
While on a Fulbright scholar-
ship in Italy, he studied at Flor-
ence, Milan, Rome, Naples and
Bolonga. Prof. Duey's studies were
focused on "17th and 18th century

st Coast Is Scheduled Orientation
ib for Spring Vacation Petitioning b

Is Now Open
Petitions for orientation leaders
positions may be pickedrup Mon-
day at the League Undergraduate
Office.
Interviewing for the posts will
be held from Tuesday through
Thursday. Second semester fresh-
men will not be allowed to peti-
tion.
The petitions are short and
consist of a few simple questions.
After filling out the petition, a
prospective orientation leader must
sign up for an interview.
All students must have an inter-
view, even if they have been orien-
tation leaders before, because the
interviewing and petitioning sys-
tem has been revised.
The orientation leaders are re-
sponsible for guiding a group of
new students around campus dur-
ing the orientation period at the
beginning of the semester. They
will have early registration privi-
leges.
Petitions are due at two p.m.
Tuesday. If there are any ques-
tions contact Linda Hepburn at
NO 3-4164.

J-HOP TICKETS-General ticket sales for J-Hop will start
Monday, Jan. 7 and continue through Tuesday, Jan. 15. Tickets
may be purchased from noon to 4:40 p.m. Monday through Friday
at the Administration Building. Those who have reservations may
pick up their tickets at any of the above stated times. Reservations
are not necessary for purchase of tickets. The deadline for sales is
Jan. 15.

PROF. PHILLIP A. DUEY CONDUCTS GLEE CLUB

vocal ornamentations and style."
He also toured Germany, France
and Austria.
Taught at CCNY
Prior to joining the University
faculty in 1947, Prof. Duey taught
at the College of the City of New
York, the Arthur Jordan Con-
servatory and was director of the
music departmenthat Butler Uni-
versity. Recently he wrote a book'
entitled "Bel Canto in Its Golden
Age." -

Glee Club director Duey is a
veteran of some 5,000 radio broad-
casts. He was a member of the
internationally famous "Revelers"
quartet. He has appeared in such
broadway shows as "Lady Do" and
the musical comedy, "Good News."
He made his opera debut in 1940
during the Summer Opera Festival I
at Central City, Colo.
The musician is now in his eighth
year with the University's Glee
Club. The Professor's knack in
arranging many of the time hon-
ored songs gives an added touch to,
his concerts. He uses sound effects,

8
I
G

r

JANUARY

Back-to-School
Specials

COLLECTION ACQUIRED BY

KELSEY.

Campus Boasts Unique Museum Exhibit

By ROSE PERLBERG
In the midst of the modern hub-
bub of University life stands the
only place outside of Egypt where
one can study written documents
and artifacts from an ancient
Roman town in Egypt.
The Francis W. Kelsey Museum
of Archaeology has the distinction
of being the one Greco-Roman
museum in the United States.
Here onehcan find, carefully
labeled and painstakingly restored,
' authentic articles that were used
in the daily activities of the an-
cient civilization. Most date from
the second and third centuries B.C.
to the fourth and fifth centuries
AD.
Kelsey Starts
It al started back in the 1890's
when Professor Kelsey, head of
the Classics department at the
University, was instrumental in
acquiring several hundred original
Roman building materials and
Greek and Latin inscriptions. The
University then had the only such
collection outside of Rome.
It continued on a larger scale
in the early 1920's when Professor
Kelsey was still head of the Clas-
sics department, and E.E. Peter-
son, the museum's current direc-
tor, was a graduate student.
Professor Kelsey was especially
interested in reconstructing Roman
civilization, Mr. Peterson recalled.
"But he used to tell me almost
every day," he said reminiscently,"
"that you couldn't understand
Rome unless you understood
Rome's provinces beyond the seas."
j original Papyri
The University had acquired
some original papyri (ancient
Egyptian writing material) out of
Egypt several years before, Peter-
son continued, but the professor
felt that one cannot thoroughly
understand them unless he knows
something about the place from
which they came.
Travelling abroad in 1919, Pro-
fessor Kelsey visited the Fayoum
Province in Egypt and saw the
sites of ancient Roman civiliza-
tionfalling prey to fertilizer hunt-
ers.
Anxious to prevent complete de-
struction and rescue whatever
archaeological evidence was still
intact, the University arranged for
field work financed 'by a grant
from Horace H. Rackham.
Excavations Began in '23
Excavations started in 1923
Peterson was one of the men who
spent the next 12 years searching
ruins while living with the peas-
ants.
From the excavations came
thousands of objects - early
Roman textiles, parts of houses,
pottery, glass, lamps and other
household utensils, toys, religious
symbols, recreational articles -
things that pieced together make
clearer the culture of a people who
live only in history books.
BROWN JUG'
fe4 trxu'a'h t

changes in rhythm and unex-
pected stage actions to accomplish
"The objects on exhibit now are "Some day," Peterson says he this.
only about one-fiftieth of the would like to go back to Egypt The first half of all concerts
material we have," the energetic and continue the "search in the given by the Club features serious
director remarked, bed of civilization." But at- the selections by well known musi-
He and two curators, Mrs. Eli- present time, money and the tur- cians, sometimes arranged by Prof.
nor M. Husselman and Louise A. bulent world situation make the Duey. The concerts usually end
Shier, who received their doctors prospects very distant, with lighter selections.
* degrees at the University, work
* full time at sorting and doing re-
search, when they're not guiding
groups through the museum. "In 5 gg hd
and out-of-state classes as well as 7G
students from the University come
oto see the collections every day." lt~ i
Care of the antiques is a job in
itself, Peterson said, but research b
takes the longest. The spritely, * % ..4. *,t.m
white-haired director estimates ..-
that it takes five years to arrange
an exhibit ,
In selecting which of the 2,000 ,
pieces of pottery or more than
30,000 textiles to put into the
polished glass cases, Peterson says:
1"We choose representative articles
with the ultimate aim of showing
as much of the town's life as pos-
sible."
Books Prepared Drop into our ste today . . . thumb through a College
The director and curators are Outline covering any of your courses ... note its meaty
umes based on their more than compactness . .. its telling paragraphs ... its newspaper-
20 years of research-"getting re- like efficiency in highlighting essentials- and putting the .
cords ready for someone else to story over. You'll be amazed that so much can be got into
use and continue when we pass1 so little space. College Outlines are the best high-marks
on." insurance obtainable. Prepare with them for exams nowl
Financial support for the u- CO LLL OUTLINE SERIE
seum, which was named in honor SERIE
of Professor Kelsey in 1953, 25
years after his death, comes
mainly from a fund left by Rack- LITTLEFI ELD OUTLINE SERIES
ham. The Rockefeller Foundation
has also contributed.End SC H AUMS OUTLINE SERIES
Nothing has been taken out of
Egypt since 1935, when the re-
search party was forced to leave Buy at
because of war threats, Peterson
said.
The site is now under the con-
trol of the Antiquities Departmenta
of the Egyptian Government, he
explained. "My old servant fromS
excavation days is posted guard State St. at N. University
there," he laughed.

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