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January 06, 1957 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-01-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 1951

SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 1951

'ANYBODY IN TROUBLE?'
Church Stages Campaign
To Help Sell Christianity-

DETROIT (IP)-An advertising
campaign to "sell" Christianity ine
much the same way industries
peddle cosmetics or automobiles is
being prepared by the Episcopal
Diocese of Michigan.
Through Newspaper advertise-
ments prepared by professional
advertising men, the Church hopes
to profit through the spread of
the Christian faith, and~ thereby1
profit those who join a church.
The campaign still lacks, how-#
Polio Drives
Help Patients
The March of Dimes has pro-
vided nation-wide. leadership in
developing new techniques for
physical rehabilitation of severely
handicapped persons, according to
Dr. David Dickinson of the Uni-
versity's polio center.
Dr. Dickinson spoke at the re-
cent kick-off dinner of the Wash-
tenaw County March of Dimes.
He showed colored slides and re-
viewed case histories to indicate
the progress made in this field in
recent years.
Useful Techniques
Techniques developed with
March of Dimes funds, he said,
have helped develop techniques
which are useful in treatingthose
stricken by cerebral palsy, muscu-
lar dystrophy, paraplegia from
broken backs or necks, and severe
arthritis.
According to Dr. Dickinson, the
University Hospital respirator cen-
ter has been full since its opening
in 1951. To date, it has helped
nearly 150 patients confined to
iron lungs to return home.
Costs Cut
The average medical costs for
patients have been cut from more
than $30 per day to an average of
about $2.50 a day.
He emphasized the need for
young adults to secure a full series
of three salk vaccine shots. "Polio
hits adults even harder than it
does .children," Dickinson said.
This year's March of Dimes
drive, which runs through Jan.
31, is shooting for a $46,900 total.

ever, what ad agency men call a
suitable "copy theme."
The Rt. Rev. Richard S. Emrich,
Bishop of Michigan, says the cam-
paign must be aimed at the needs
and, problems of all Christian
faiths, not merely the Episcopal
Church.
No High Pressure
"We are not out to high pressure
people on the Episcopal Church
as against other Christian congre-
gations," he says. "It would be
ridiculous for us to advertise that
we have all the answers facing
Christian mankind."
Much of the campaign, Bishop
Emnrich said, would be patterned
after one carried out with great
success by Christ Episcopal Church
in Cincinnati.
The Washington, D.C., Diocese
now has adopted the idea, and
Episcopal leaders there will test
the theory that churches, like
business firms, can profit by pro-
fessionally prepared ads. The
weekly . series of two-column ads
is prepared by Episcopal laymen
who are advertising men in private
life.
For Those With Problems
All are addressed primarily to
people who are not attached to
any church but who find them-
selves troubled with crises or prob-
lems in their lives.
One ad, for example, is headed:
"Anybody in Trouble? Let God
have a try." It carried this text:
"So often trouble turns a per-
son inward on himself, only aggra-
vatingnthe worry. Don't try to go
it alone. There is a trustworthy
friend who can help you solve your
problems. Your minister can bring
you the guidance of God's wisdom
and love."
Always Welcome
Each advertisement in the series
features a different Episcopal
parish church, and each concludes
with the assurance that "you're
always welcome in an Episcopal
Church."
"Are you alone in the city?"
asked one advertisement. "The
biggest crowds can be the loneliest
places. So can bars, taverns and
cocktail lounges. The Episcopal
>church can show you the most
satisfying way never to feel alone
again.

i
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i

"t ~and' .A
... .. IPower generaingaclitis
I Wok onpowe faclitis jare now 50, per cent complete.
and seaway lock proceed- g... 'lL'i Transmission of el1ectricity
ing o scheulewill start in 1958.
lake:f. . .DihtD : O
Are shwnon etale
- -.r s"Ivr~ NQ~
tok t
Toone-third complete. Grass
Rive 'Loctabt oefut
~~A / N6 2 T&7 F :::........................... ..fnihed.So.d.b.r ad
-. . . .... .... .... ...
EAP Newsfeatures

Hillel, Yiddish Class, 10 a.m., Hillel. Per and Program, 6 p.m., Lutheran
S* Student Center.
Hillel, Supper Club, 10 a.m., Hillel. HlelChrsletn,:3pm,
* * Main Chapel, Hillel.
Congregational and Disciples Student Unitarian. Student Group, Meeting,
Guild, Meeting, 7 p.m., Congregational 7 p.m., First Unitarian Church, Speak-
Church, Speaers: Sue Gillespie and er, Dr. Hunter, "Current Research on
Bob Bates, "H~ow Far Is It To India." Cancer."
Graduate Outing Club, Hike and
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Supper, 2 p.m., Rackham.
Meeting, 4 p.m., Lane Hall, Speaker:
Rev. Donald MacLennan, "Abidinguin Deutscher Verein, Meeting, 7.30 p.m.,
Christ." Tuesday, Room 3G, Union.
& Contemporary Literature Club, Or.
Lutheran Student Association, Sup- ganizational Meeting, 4:10 pm.
Read Daily Classifieds
FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMENATION SCHEDULE
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Janary 18 to Jarnuary 29, 1956
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "time
of class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitatior only, the "time of class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the con-
flict is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular
schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instruc-
tor as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

"=x

4

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One Fourth of St. Lawrence Seaway

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WASHINGTON (P) - The St.
Lawrence seaway, one of the 20th
century's great construction pro-
jects, stands today 25 per cent
completed.
Starting ,from scratch less than
20 months ago, a turbulent section
of the mighty St. Lawrence River
has been tamed to the extent that
vast hydroelectric and navigational
benefits will soon be available.
The seaway, fulfillment of a 50-
year dream, will enable about 75
per cent of the world's shipping
to travel from the Atlantic through
the St. Lawrence to ports on the
Great Lakes.
Cost-One Billion
Altogether, the seaway and the
related project of developing the
2,200,000 horsepower hydroelectric
potential of the river's Interna-
tional Rapids section - by New
York State and Ontario - will
cost one billion dollars, give or
take a few millions.
And, in anticipation of the eco-
nomic benefits that seaway plan-
ners say will flow to cities and
villages along the river and the
Great Lakes, many more millions
will be spent by local interests in
this country and Canada to im-
prove harbor and port facilities.
Additionally, the federal govern-
ment - through Congress - has
committed itself to the spending
of another 125 million dollars to

improve and deepen connecting
channels in the Great Lakes.
Ultimate Goal
Such work will permit vesselsE
up to 25,000 tons to travel2,3421
miles from the Atlantic to the
head of Lake Superior, 602 feet.
above sea level, That is the ulti-
mate seaway goal.
The immediate goal is to get
ships of that size - and smaller
through to Lake Erie and such
river and lake ports as Ogdens-
burg, Oswego, Rochester and Buf-
falo, N. Y., Toronto and Hamilton,
Ont., and Cleveland and Toledo,
Ohio, to mention a few.
Nature, in forging the Great
Lakes-St. Lawrence system, did a
virtually perfect job - with one
exception. That's the reason for
the seaway and the expenditure
of over a billion dollars.
Nature's Bottleneck
In fashioning the St. Lawrence,
as far as deep-draft ocean-going
shipping is concerned nature left
a "hard core" 114-mile bottleneck
between Ogdensburg and Montreal
in the form of rushing rapids and
rock crusted shoals.
Canada, more than 50 years
ago, eased the shipping bottleneck,
somewhat by constructing a 14-
foot-deep canal system that skirts
the rapids. But only the smaller
ships can traverse the canals.
Canada also constructed the Wel-

land Canal, which enables ships to
pass between Lakes Ontario and
Erie, and built the Soulanges and
Lachine locks, just above Mon-
treal. Thescapacity of these last
installations is being greatly in-
creased,
The seaway, with an average
depth of 27 feet, will eliminate the
long stretch of shallows in the
International Rapids section. Only
the largest ocean liners and
freighters will be denied access to
the river above Montreal.
1959 Deadline
Completion of the joint U.S.-
Canadian project is scheduled for
the spring of 1959. Transmission
of electricity from the huge pow-
erhouses near Massena, N. Y., will
start sometime in the late summer
or fall of 1958.
The power project will yield
about 13 billion kilowatt hours a
year, to be divided equally be-
tween New York state and the
Province of Ontario.
The huge output, made possible
by the 90-foot falling of 110 mil-
lion gallons of water each minute
in the International Rapids sec-
tion, is exceeded in North America
only by the Grand Coulee dam.
Power engineers estimate their
project is now about 50 per cent
complete. Work on this phase of
the dual development began sev-

Completed
eral months prior to the start of
seaway construction.
U.S. Projects
Major seaway work delegated to
the United States is the digging of
a 10-mile shipping canal - the
Long Sault - a few miles north-
east of Massena, N. Y., and con-
struction of two mammoth locks
-one about midway in the canal
and the other at its eastern end.
The canal and its locks will en-
able shipping to by-pass the power
projects 2,950-foot spillway dam.
The locks, one named in honor
of President Eisenhower, will cost
in the neighborhood of 20 million
dollars each. The other is the
Grass River Lock.
Each is 800 feet long, 80 feet
wide and 30 feet deep.
Ahead of Schedule
The St. Lawrence Seaway Devel-
opment Corp., the agency created
by Congress to construct and ad-
minister the U.S. section of the
seaway, estimates the Eisenhower
lock is about one-third complete,
and' Grass 'River about 25 per
cent. Each, however, is ahead of
schedule.
More than 200,000 cubic yards
of cement have already been
poured into the walls of each
lock. Excavation and dike em-
bankment of the Long Sault canal
is around 40 per cent complete.

&

Time of Class

Time of Examination

MONDAY
TUESDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday, January 21
Thursday, January 24
Saturday, January 26
Friday, January 18
Saturday, January 19
Saturday, January 19
Tuesday, January 29
Tuesday. January 22
Wednesday, January 23
Friday, January 25
Monday, January 28
Saturday, January 19
Tuesday, January 29
Tuesday, January 22
Monday. Jknuary 28

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
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2-5
9-12
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9-12
9-12
9-12
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DAILY. OFFICIAL BULLETIN

l!,

(Continued on Page 4)
gree of Doctor of Musical Arts (in
Performance). Race studies with Jo-
seph Brinkman and Benning Dexter,
and his program of compositions byt
Schubert, Bach and Ravel will be opent
to the general public.1
Academic Notices
Attention February Graduates: Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and the3
Arts, School of Education, School of
Music, School of Public Health, and
School of Business Administration-
students are advised not to request
grades of I or X in, February. When
such grades are absolutely imperative,
the work must be made up in time to
allow your instructor to report the
make-up grade not later than 8:30 a.m.,
Monday, Feb. 4, 1957. Grades received
awter that time may defer the stu-
dent's graduation until a later date.
Recommendations for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wishing
to recomment tentative February
graduates from the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, and the
School of Education for departmental
honors (or high honors in the College
of L.S.&A.) should recommend such
students in a letter sent to the Of-
fice of Registration and Records, Room
1513 Administration Building, by 8:30
a.m. Mon., Feb. 4, 1957.
Operations Research Seminar: Joseph
McCloskey, Case Institute -of Tech-
nology, will lecture on "Training for
Operations Research" on Wed., Jan. 9.
Coffee hour at 3:30 in Room 243, West
Engineering Building and seminar in
Room 229, West Engineering Building
at 4:00 p.m. All faculty members wel-
come.
Doctoral., Examination for Tony
Brouwer, Economics: thesis: "The
Limitation of the Work Week: An
Analysis of its Rationale, Enforce-
ment, and Economic Effects," Mon.,

Jan. 7, 105 Economic Building, at 4:00
p.m Chairman, William Haber.
Doctoral Examination for Chih Kang
Wu, Education: thesis: "The Influ-
ence of the Y.M.C.A. on the Develop-
ment of Physical Education in China,"
Mon., Jan. 7, East Council Room, Rack-
ham Building, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman,
E. D. Mitchell.
Doctoral Examination for Frank L.
Schick, Library Science; thesis: "The
Paperbound Book in America. The
History of Paperbacks and Their Eu-
ropean Antecedents," Tues., Jan. 8,
East Council Room, Rackham Build-
ing, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman, R. H.
Gjelsness.
Coming Events
Science Research Club, Jan. meeting.
in the Auditorium, Mortimer E. Cooley
Building, North Campus at 7:30 pm.,
Program: "Electronic Factors in De-
termining Properties of Molecules,"
Milton Tamres-Chemistry; "The Ford
Nuclear Reactor," Henry J. Gomberg
and Ardath H. Emmons-Nuclear En-
gineering and Phoenix Project. The
last paper will be followed by a tour
of inspection of the Ford Nuclear Re-
actor. Dues for 1956-57 accepted after
7:10 p.m.
Placement Notices
The following schools will be at the
Bureau of Appointments, on Wed., Jan.
9 to inter-view for teachers.
Port Leyden, New York - Speech
Correction; English, Mathematics.
St. Clair Shores, Michigan (Lakeview
School) -- All elementary for Feb., 1957
and Sept., 1957; Elem. Art; Elem. Tea-
cher Consultant for Physically Handi-
capped.
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Rdministration Build-
ing, NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

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7

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Botany 2
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 15, 23,
182, 183
Economics 71
Economics 72
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101,
153
English 1, 2
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31,
32, 61, 62
German 1, 2, 31
Latin 21
Political Science 1
Psychology 31, 190, 235
Russian 1
Sociology 1, 60, 101
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 3015, 401, 401M,
401S

Friday, January 18
Friday, January 18
Tuesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 29
Tuesday, January 22
Monday, January 21.
Thursday, January 24
Saturday, January 26
Thursday, January 24
Monday, January 28
Friday, January 25
Thursday, January 24
Wednesday, January 23
Saturday, January 26

2-5

2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
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4'

HEAR

THIS!

A

Thursday. January 24 1-10 p.M.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

i'

Bus. Ad. 11
Bus. Ad. 12

Tuesday, January 22
Tuesday. January 29

2-5
9-12

RENEW YOUR
SUBSCRIPTION
to
THE DAILY
NOW !

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

,4

A. E. 1, secs. 1, 3
A. E. 130
C. E. 20, 21, 151
C. E. 22
C. E. 23
C. E. 70
Drawing 1, 3
Drawing 1s, 2
Drawing lx
E. E. 5
E. M. 1
E. M. 2
Eiglish 10, 11
I. E. 100, 110
M. E. 2
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 3015, 401,'401M,
401S
Physics 53

Thursday, January 24
Wednesday, January 23
Monday, January 21
Thursday, January 24
Friday, January 25
Saturday, January 26
Friday, January 25
Saturday, January 26
Thursday, January 24
Friday, January 18
Friday, January 18
Wednesday, January 23
Monday, January 21
Monday, January 21
Friday, January 25

2-5
2-51
2-5
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+d
'.

of fi

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to'

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ser1

yoN

f MAIN OFFICEI
101-107 S. Main St.
ees o NICKELS ARCADE
330 S. State Street
* NEAR 'ENGINE ARCH'
1108 South University
a PACKARD-BROCKMAN
1923 Packard
* WH ITMORE LAKE
9571 N. Main St.
BUYING A CAR?
Then you'll want to investigate on
Ann Arbor Bank automotive loan.
At Ann Arbor Bank, you'll find
in rocLr.cc .k . - in,., - 4-

.just

Thursday, January 24 7-10 p.m.
Friday, January 18 2-5

$4

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for adjust-
ment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between Decem-
ber 10 and 21 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulle-

A

.........

FOR THE REST OF THE SCHOOL YEAR

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