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December 05, 1956 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-05

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE PIVI

. aa. ,/ iy i # ,Iv

R

Mrs. Duvall
To Lecture
i na
,On Marriage
Sociology Departmentj
Sponsors Well-Known
Speaker at Rackham
"Planning for a successful mar-
riage," will be the topic of a lec-
ture given by Evelyn Millis Du-
vall at 7 p.m. today in the Rack-
( ham Lecture Hall.

Undergraduate Plans Offer MOST ALL-AROUND:
Studies Abroad for Juniors IBM Selects Typical U Student

By SALLY LEASE
France, Spain, Switzerland,
Italy. are countries where quali-
fied junior undergraduates are,
offered a chance by various col-
leges to study.
One of the ways for students to
study abroad is through a college
undergraduate plan. A working
knowledge of the country's langu-
age, recommendations from col-I
lege teachers and a personal his-
tory are necessary to be considered

Council administrators. There are
also curricular courses like anI
educational course given in Mex-
ico.
Doctor Davis recommends that
any student interested in study-
ing abroad should contact Russell
Hanson, Room 18 in the Interna-
tional Center. Studying abroad
could be an enriching experience,
but as Doctor Davis says, "It de-
pends on the person's objective."
Petitions For

J-HOP BANDS-Duke Ellington and Buddy Morrow will play
dance music alternately at the annual J-Hop which will take
place from 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m., February 4 at the I-M Building.
The dance will take place during registration week due to the
lack of a semester break in the new calendar.
J-Hop To Bill Bands
O#fEllington, Mororw

A question and answer period for the plan. .Y
will be held after Mrs. Duvall's Smith College offers many bene-
talk. fits with its college plan. Students
Prof. Robert 0. Blood, Jr., As- may receive scholarships or loans.
sistant Professor of Sociology and The majority pay their own way,
faculty counselor, said that Mrs. including room and board, tuition,
Duvall is one of the best known voyage over and back, and all
and most popular lecturers among their personal expenses. The total
marriage, cost, except the voyage, amounts{
*ra.to approximately what a year at
Has Written Nine Books Smith College would cost.
Mrs. Duvall has written nine Accommodations Arranged
books and numerous articles for t

i
s
}
> '

Senior

Night

The bands of Duke Ellington
and Buddy Morrow will provide
music for dancers at the annual
J-Hop which will take place from
9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m., Feb. 4 at the
I-M Building.
This is the first time in several
years that two leading bands will
be playing alternately at the same
dance.
Ellington entertained several
years; ago at the J-Hop, and he
was received with much enthusi-
asm at a concert in a "Negro Cul-
ture" series presented here last
summer. He also played last year
at the Military Ball.
Golden Thirties Ensemble
Ellington's ensemble is the only
one in the country that has never
disbanded from the period of the
"Golden Thirties."
To add to his outstandingness
as a pianist and band leader, he
has composed a number of hits
such as "Mood Indigo," "Sophis-
ticated Lady," "Creole Rhapsody,"
and ''Never No Lament
("Don't Get Around Much Any-
More.") He is quite accustomed to
having his melodies used by other
composers.
Trombonist Morrow got his start
with featured parts in the bands
of Paul Whiteman, Eddie Duchin,
Artie Shaw and Tommy Dorsey.
Musical Hit Wins Name
With his 1950 hit "Rose, Rose I
Love You" which reached the top
of all the big selling lists in the
nation, Morrow achieved his posi-
tion as leader of one of the top
bands in the country.
In 1951 his band was voted the
number one most promising band

in the country by over 2000 disk
jockeys in the Annual Billboard
Magazine Disk Jockey Poll.
His successes include "Night
Train," "Stairway to the Stars,"
and "Grayhound." He played at
the 1954 J-Hop.
Famous Trombone
Morrow's trombone, insured for
$10,000, is custom made with a
special designand special materi-
als and is the only one that he
carries.
Both bands have toured many
parts of the country. They will,
by request, play their own hits
which have been popular record-
ings.
Band chairman Ann McDonald
explained, "Some bands were
eliminated not by our own choice,
but because they were either in
the wrong part of the country,
making films or not touring."
Campus Acts
To Audition
Gulantics Entry Blanks
Obtainable at League
Student acts, of all types such
as comedians, singers, instrumen-
tal groups and dance numbers,
are equally encouraged to audi-
tion for Gulantics, the annual all-
campus talent revue.
Those interested in trying out
may make an appointment with
Mary Klauer, who can be reached
at NO 2-5618. Tryouts are to be
held on Saturday, Dec. 8 and Sat-
urday Dec. 15.
Students may pick up audition
entry blanks at the League Under-
graduate office.
Gulantics was- originated eight
years ago by Glee Club director
Prof. Philip A. Duey. A contest
was sponsored to, provide a name
for it.
The winner used the letter "G"
for Glee Club, "U" for Union, "L"
for League and added "antics",
comprising the name Gulantics.

popular and professional periodi-
cals on marriage, family living,
teen-agers and in-laws.
"Facts of Life and Love," a book
of sex education written by Mrs.
Duvall primarily for adolescents,
was banned in Detroit, according
to Prof. Blood. He said this inci-
dent raised quite a stir, and that
the Detroit Council of Churches
protested, saying this was the kind
of book teenagers ought to be
reading.
Mrs. Duvall will be appearing
on Prof. Blood's series of television
programs on marriage, to speak
on the subject of in-laws. Prof.
Blood said that to his knowledge,
she is the only person to have
written a book on in-laws.
has PhD
Mrs. Duvall obtained her bache-
lor of science degree at Syracuse
University in 1937, her master's
degree at Vanderbilt University
and her PhD at the University of
Chicago. She has also attended
Northwestern University and thel
Teacher's College of Columbia
University.
Books which Mrs. Duvall hasi
written are "Building Your Mar-
riage," "Facts of Life and Love,"
"Family Living," "Keeping UpI
with Teen-Agers," "Leading Par-I
ents' Groups," "Marriage Is What
You Make It," "When You Marry"
and "In;-Laws: Pro and Con." Her
most recent book, "Family Devel-
opment," will be published next
year.
Summer Teaching
She has also done summer3
teaching at Florida State Univer-
sity, Indiana University, Iowal
State College, Kent State Univer-
sity, Northwestern University, Syr-
acuse University, the University
of Chicago and the University of
Tennessee.
She is married and has two
children.

All the necessary accommoda-
tions are arranged by Smith. They
apply for the passage, and contact
people for the student to stay
with. The quarters are usually a
little better than the average, for
they have a homelike atmosphere.
A student is more likely to re-
ceive full credit for his year
abroad if he goes on an approved
plan. Smith College registers him
in recommended classes.
Doctor Davis of the Interna-
tional Center says, "the competi-
tion is tremendous." Every year
people with many activities and
campus records are considered as
possible recipients so the students
grades become increasingly impor-I
tant.
Language Major Not Necessary
One need not be a language
major to study on one of these
plans. Many students study art,#
architecture and history.
The first six weeks that the
student is in the country, he takes
an orientation course in which
constant use of the country's lan-
guage is emphasized. All the class-
es are taught by teachers of that
particular country and many trips
to nearby places of interest.
Some students study abroad in-
dependently. They usually stay at
international hotels and arrange
all their classes and incidentals
for themselves.
National Scholarships Offered
There are four programs that
offer national scholarships to
graduate students. The Fulbright
program gives United States Gov-
ernment grants. Tht Buenos Aires
convention has a study abroad pro-
gram with twenty countries in the
Western Hemisphere. The Rhodes
and Marshall flans send students
to England. Rhodes students must
study at Oxford.
The free University of Berlin
has a direct exchange program
which the Student Government

C lose Today
Petitioning is still open for
chairmanship positions of Senior
Night, to be held Thursday,'March
121.
The deadline of petitions has
been extended to 5 p.m. today. If
anyone is unable to get her pe-
tition in on the deadline and is
still interested in doing so, please
contact Ruth Jaffe, chairman of
the Interviewing and Nominating
Committee, at the League.
Interviewing will begin today
in the Interviewing and Nominat-
ing Committee Room of the
League.
Petitions for Senior Women
Positions open to senior women
' include general chairman, who
will coordinate the Central Com-!
mittee, arrange for committee
meetings, check on committee
members, share in work on the
afternoon of the banquet, appoint
a secretary from the Central Com-
mittee, and act as general organ-
izer.
Assistant general chairman will
plan the menu for the banquet
with the help of the Central Com-
mittee and arrange for the march-
ing band as part of her duties.
Entertainment chairman will
decide the banquet entertainment
and meet with chairmen of Frosh
Weekend, Soph Scandals, and
JGP to decide the theme and dis-
cuss excerpts to be used. She will
also schedule and take charge of
rehearsals.
Various Chairmanships
Other openings will include pa-
trons chairman, who will present
a list of patronesses to the Cen-
tral Committee, and send, written
invitations to patronesses.
The ticket chairman will make
announcements at Panhel and As-
sembly meetings so that presi-
dents can appoint representatives
to sell tickets. She will contact
representatives in each league
house, dormitory, and sorority
house who sell tickets to seniors
and send letters to married women
explaining Senior Night and
where one gets tickets.

By NANCY STAMM
Out of 56,000 qualified students
in the United States one man,
Gene Metsker, was chosen as the
most typical college student.
In recent months a telephone
company has been featuring a se-
ries of articles in its magazine
about the lives of their 2 million
employees. Most recent was an ar-
ticle on the college education of
one of the employee's children,
Gene Metsker.
Metsker, a junior in engineering
school, was chosen from 56,000
students by an IBM machine
which sifted and sorted them ac-
cording to their qualifications.
Midwestern Qualification
Attendance at a midwestern co~l-
lege was one of the'qualifications.
The reason for this was to prevent
favoring either the Eastern Ivy
League or the Pacific West Coast
League.
A second qualification which
Metsker fulfilled is being a stu-
dent of Junior standing. The rea-
son for the choice of a junior
was to have someone who was
familiar with college life.
Extracurricular activities were
the final qualification by which
the IBM machines sorted the ap-
plicants. A student who was ac-
tively participating in a variety
of activities, but not outstanding
in any one of these was desired.
WAA Tournaments
Women's Athletic Association
tournaments are in full swing
again this week.
Playing in the basketball
tournament will be Delta Gam-
ma against Alpha Chi Omega
and Collegiate Sorosis versus
Delta Delta Delta at 5:10 p.m.
today.
The third round singles
matches of the badminton tour-
nament will be held from 7 to
9 p.m. tonight, with the first
round doubles matches sched-
uled for the same time.

Metsker has enjoyed his chair-
manships on various committees
despite the great amount of work.
Last year he headed the Interfra-
ternity Council's Christmas party
given for the children of Ann Ar-
bor's elementary schools. Metsker
also headed the poster committee
on Spring Weekend.
"Duties associated with my fra-
ternity, Alpha Sigma Phi, have
been of great interest to me," said
Metsker. At present he is secretary
and pledge master of his house.
During the two years that he
served IFC social committee he
wrote their manual.
Writing is one of Metsker's tal-
ents. He enjoys writing poetry and
fiction. Although he considers
himself "still an amateur" in this
field, he won the National Schol-
astic Writing Contest award for a
detective story. At the University
he has written for the Technic
and worked on The Daily business
staff.
Engineering Major
Metsker, who represents his

-Daily-Harding Williams
GENE METSKER - TYPICAL COLLEGE STUDENT

class on the Engineering Board,
is majoring in engineering physics.
This summer he has the oppor-
tunity to work in White ' Sands,
New Mexico, for a company which
is experimenting with guided mis-
siles for the Navy.
"I think it's a great opportunity
for me to get a chance to work
at something that I will enjoy
and is still in the field I am in-
terested in," remarked Metsker.
At the end of the summer Met-
sker is going to Washington where
he is joining six fellow members
of the Alpine Club, an honorary
mountain climbing club, for a
couple of weeks in the mountains.
Favorite Pastimes
Mountain climbing, playing golf,
ice skating and leisurely listening
to hi-fi are among his favorite
pastimes.
If he is deferred from the Army,
the engineer's future plans in-
clude further studying for his
masters and eventually doing nl-
clear physics work in space travel.

THE JOHN STOTT LECTURES
"WHAT THINK YE'
OF CHRIST?"
December 10 thru 14 . . . 8:00 P.M.
Sponsored by Michigan Christian Fellowship
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

I

d4crn'44Camp/ou

I

SPRING WEEKEND - Spring
Weekend publicity committee will
hold a mass meeting at 7:15 p.m.
tonight in Rms. 3K and L in the
Union.
ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP -'
Associate members of all women's
residences will meet tonight at
7:30 p.m. in the Michigan Room of
the League.

HERE ARE THE LAST IN THE
SERIES OF 24 OLD GOLD
PUZZLES

t SEE all op E
so uhave t tJVt.
That's why American Express Student Tours are expertly
planned to include a full measure of individual leisure-
ample free time to discover your Europe-as well as the
most comprehensive sight-seeing program available any-
where! Visit England, Scotland, Denmark, Norway,
Sweden, Holland, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Switzer-
land, Italy and France-accompanied by distinguished
tour leaders-enjoy superb American Express service
throughout.
11 Special Tours ... 53 to 63 days ... via famous ships:
Ile de France, United States, Liberta, Saturnia,
Guilio Cesare, Flandre. $1,448 up
Also Regular Tours ... 42 days.. . $1,301 up
t You can always
4 ^,cTRAVEL NOW-PAY LATER
when you go American Express.
For complete information, see your
Campus Representative,
local Travel Agent or
American Express (
Travel Service,
member: Institute of f
International Education and Council
on Student Travel
...or simply mail the handy coupon.}

Running a Classified Ad
Everyday is
Sure to bring you
U nusual results and
Lots of good
Timely Customers and
Sales as well
Place your Ad NOW
The Michigan Daily
CLASSI FIEDS

PUZZLE NO. 22
CLUE: Opened in 1876, this western uni-
versity is named for a great Mormon leader.
ANSWER
Name
Address
City Sta
College

PUZZLE NO. 23
E3
CLUE: This university derives its name
from a portion of the Northwest Territory.
It includes coordinate colleges for men
and women.
ANSWER
Name
Address
City Sate_
College

PUZZLE NO. 24
E2
CLUE: Located on the shore of one of the
Great Lakes, this university was opened
in 1855. Frances Willard was once dean
of women here.
ANSWER
Name
Address
City St
College

PLAYERS may now mail their completed sets of 24 Tangle
Schools solutions in accordance with rule 8 of the Official
Tangle Schools Rules.
Before mailing your puzzles, keep an accurate record of your
answers. All players should be familiar with the Official Rules
which appeared at the beginning of the contest. Players are urged
to reread the rules carefully and follow them closely. Rule No. 3
reads:
3. NOTE (a) When entrants have completed solutions to the
complete set of 24 puzzles . . . the solutions are to be printed or
typewritten by the entrant in the answer space provided on the
puzzle (or a reasonable facsimile). The complete set of 24 puzzles
must be answered, neatly trimmed, and enclosed in an envelope,
flat and not rolled, and addressed to:-Tangle Schools, P. O. Box
26A, Mount Vernon 10, N. Y., and mailed, bearing a postmark
not later than December 19, 1956. Decorated, pasted or embel-
lished puzzles are not permitted. Each set of 24 puzzles must be
accompanied by a wrapper from any type Old Gold Cigarette
package (Regular, King Size or Filter Kings) or a reasonable
facsimile thereof.
(c) After the deadline for mailing solutions, the correct
answers to all 24 puzzles will be published in a single issue
of this paper. Each contestant must keep an
accurate record of all solutions and check his
answers with the published correct answers.
a% AA ras-nA -A * * ~iTA - as..

FOLLOW THESE MAILING INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY!

DOE, JOHN
LAKE DRIVE+
SOUTH BEND,
IND.

Print or type your name and return
address on back of envelope,
last name first, like this:
To help checkers, use business-
size envelope approximately
4" x 9/', Type or print the
address as shown.
Use 60 postage.

H

TANGLE~SCHOOLS
P. O. BOX 26A
MOUNT VERNON~10, N. Y.

- Use business-size envelope 4" x 9ys"....sometimes referred
to as a No. 10 envelope.
0 Each of the puzzles must be neatly trimmed, separately, and
placed in numerical order.
0 No decorations please! Address envelope as shown.

:.; rff
'y. 7
_

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