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December 05, 1956 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1956-12-05

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y

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1956

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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(Continued from Page 4)
Christmas Holidays. While the Uni-
versity offices and departments will be
open on the Mondays before Christmas
and New Year's Day, staff members
will have the option of selecting one
of the two Mondays as an additional
holiday. Those staff members who se-
lect the Monday before Christmas as a
holiday will work the Monday before
New Year's, and, conversely, those who
work on the, Monday before Christmas
will have the Monday before New Year's
as a holiday.
Graduation Exercises for students
who complete their degree requirements
at the end of the first semester of the
1956-57 school year will be held Sat.,
Jan. 26, 1957, at 2:00 p.m. in Hill Audi-I
torium.
Applications for Fellowships and
scholarships in the graduate school for
1957-58 are now available. Applications!
for renewal should also be filed at this
time. Competition closes Feb. 15, 1957.
Blanks and information may be ob-
tained in the Graduate School offices.
Rackham Building. Only students who
intend to enroll in the Horace H.
Rackham School of Graduate Studies
for 1957-58 may apply.
Fellowship Applications are, now
available for the Margaret Kraus Rams-'
dell Award. This Fellowship is used to
assist students ,of the University of
Michigan in pursuing graduate studies
in this country or abroad, in religious
education or in preparation for the
Christian ministry. Both men and wo-
men may apply for this fellowship. Ap-
plications should be made to the Dean
of the Graduate School, on forms ob-
tainable from the Graduate School. The
deadline is March 15, 1957.
Agenda, Student Government Council
Dec. 5, 1956.
Minutes of previous meeting.
Officers reports: President: Galens mo-
tion.
Vice President: Evaluation commit-
tee-Appointment of student mem-
bers, Announcement of faculty mem-
bers.
Student Representation.
Activities:Dec. 15, Barristers Society,
Wig and Robe dance, Union Ballroom
Old Business: Sigma Kappa.
New Business.
Members and constituents time.
Adjournment.
Lectures
Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures:
"Greek Architecture in Ancient Italy,"
by Professor William B. Dinsmoor of
Columbia University. Aud. B, Angell
Hall, 4:15 p.m.
University Lecture: Gustave Reese,
Adjunct Professor of Music in the
Graduate School of New York Univer-
sity and head of publication depart-
ment of Carl Fischer, Inc., 4:15 p.m.,
today in the Rackham Amphitheater.I
"The Polyphonic Magnificat Before
1600." Open to the general public. E
George C. Miles of The American Nu-
mismatic Society will deliver a pub-
lic lecture on "An Archaeological Re-
connaissance in Crete," illustrated with
slides, Thurs., Dec. 6, 4:15 p.m., Aud. B,
Angell Hall. Co-sponsored by the Depts.
of Fine Arts and Near Eastern Studies.
Phi Sigma lecture, Thurs., Dec. 6,
8:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater. Dr.
Theodore H. Hubbell, director and
curator of insects, Museum of Zoology,
will speak on "Some Aspects of Zool-
ogy in Tropical America". Public in-
vtied. Initiation of new members,
Rackham Amphitheater, 7:30 p.m.
Research Seminar of the Mental
Health Research Institute. Dr. Anatol
Rapoport, professor of mathematical
biology, Mental Health Research In-

stitute, will speak on "Quantification
of Performance in a Logical Task With
Uncertainty" Dec. 6, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.,
Conference Room, Children's Psychiat-
ric Hospital.
Plays
Hansel and Gretel will be presented
by the Department of Speech and the
School of Music at 8 p.m. tonight in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Late-
comers will not be seated during the
overture. -
Academic Notices
Junior Engineers: Technical work ex-
perience in a choice of 21 foreign coun-
tries is available during summer vaca-
tion through the Institute for Inter-
national Education. If interested, ob-
tain detailed information and applica-
tion blanks from the Engineering
Placement Office, Room 347, West En-
gineering Building.
Sociology Undergraduate Forum: Dr.
Evelyn Duvall of Chicago, Illinois, will
speak on "Planning for a Successful
Marriage" in the Rackham Lecture
Hall, Wed., Dec. 5, at 7:00 p.m. Public
invited.
Mtahematics Colloquium: Wed., Dec.
5, at 4:10 p.m. in Room 3011 A.H. Prof.
R. Duncan Luce, of Columbia Univer-
sity, will speak on "Probabilistic Theory
of Utility".
Applied Mathematics Seminar (Math
347) Thurs. Dec. 6 4:00 p.m. Room 247,
W. Engineering Bldg. Prof. C. L. Dolph
will speak on "Saddle-Point Charac-
terization of the Schwinger Variation-
al Principle in Exterior Scattering Prob-
lems." Refreshments at 3:30 in Room
274, W. Engineering Bldg.
Placement Noticeg
Personnel Interviews:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
Mon., Dec. 10
Atomic Energy Commission, Lemont,
Ill., work in Washington, D. C. and
elsewhere - men with M.S. in Engrg.,
Chem., and Physics for Jr. Professional
Development Program in Nuclear Tech-
nology. This is technical and adminis-
trative work. Men are also needed with
M.A. In BusAd., Management Engrg.,
Public Administration, International
Affairs, Engrg. and Physical Science

with an interest in technical manage-E
ment courses during graduate work; and
men with B.A. in Econ., Engrg., Pol.
Science, and Physcial Science for Jr.
Management Development Program.
Wed., Dec. 12
Mich. Civil Service Commission, work
throughout Mich. - men and women
with any degree for various positions
including those in Administration, So-
cial Work, Economics, Statistics, Man-
agement, Personnel, etc.
Thurs., Dec. 13
City of Detroit, Dept. of Parks and
Recreation, Detroit, Mich. - men and
women with degree in Recreation Lead-
ership or LS&A for Recreation Director.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.
Summer Placement
The Summer Placement Service will
start Dec. 5, 9:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., in
Room 3-G of the Michigan Union. We
will have summer jobs for men and
women students in camps, resorts, busi-
ness and industry, technical and non-
technical.
Organization
Notices
Roger Williams Fellowship, tea and
toy repair time, 4-5 p.m., Guild House
*' * *
Physics Club, meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
2038 Randall, speaker: Dr. K. T. Hecht
"The Analysis of High Resolution Mol-
ecular Spectra."
* * 1
Hillel, Cultural Committee meeting,
4:15 p.m., Hillel.
Hillel, Religious Committee meeting,
4:15 p.m., Hillel.
Hillel, Elementary Hebrew Class, 7:45
p.m., Hillel.
* * 4
Lutheran Student Association, Ves-
per service and Holy Communion, 9:30
p.m., Chapel.
* * *
I1 Circolo Italiano, conversation hour,
4:10 p.m., Union Snack Bar,
* * *
Spring Weekend, special events sub-
committee chairmen meeting, 4:15 p.m.,
Room 3A, Union,
* * *
Ullr Ski Club, meeting, 7:30 p.m,
Union.
leaning
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* Trouser cuffs brushed
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* Seam-rips repaired
* Buttons replaced
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Cleaners
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Mrs. Budda's December
PACE MAGAZINE

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SAC Bombers Can Hit Any Red Target

By The Associated Press
In the opinion of many high
officials, the unstable chain of
events in the Soviet satellites and
the drastically altered positions of
big powers in the Middle East
have combined to make the pres-
ent world situation more unpre-
dictable-and therefore potentially
more dangerous-than at any time
since the end of World War II.
Complicating the picture even
further is a possible power straggle
within the Kremlin.
These circumstances bring the
possibility of a general war -
which always has lurked in the
background during the decade-
long postwar competition between'
East and West - uncomfortably
closer to the foreground.
The factor which generally is
regarded as doing more than any-
thing else to insure that global
warfare does not cross the line
from dire possibility to horrible
reality is the U.S. Strategic Air
Command and the hydrogen bombs
with which its planes are armed.
Operating from domestic and
overseas bases, SAC bombers could
approach continental Russia from
many different angles-as the ac-
companying map shows.
Capabilities Demonstrated
In a demonstration of its inter-
continental capability, the Air
Force last week sent up a group
of B52s for non-stop flights of
from 13,500 to 17,000 miles. The
planes flew continually for up to
31 hours. They were refueled in
the air, but the Air Force refused
on security grounds to say how
many times.
The B52, powered by eight jet
engines and capable of over 6,000
miles without refueling, now is,
rolling off production lines regu- 1

larly. Two of SAC's 11 heavy
bomber wings have been equipped
with these advanced aircraft. A
third heavy wing is scheduled to
discard its long range but rela-
tively slow B36s within a few
weeks. There are 45 planes in each
B52 wing.
The Strategic Air Command
operates from 37 bases in the con-
tinental United States and a vari-
able number overseas. The Air
Force is now in the process of
increasing the number of its
domestic bases, to achieve greater
dispersion. The plan is to have
no more than one wing on each
base and in some cases to spread
a single wing among two or more
bases.
Overseas, the extensive foreign
bases system permits planning for
strikes at Russia from nearly every
point of the compass.
Funds Sought
.yRed Cross
Washtenaw County Chapter of
the American Red Cross launched
a campaign yesterday to raise
$4,200 for Hungarian relief, ac-
cording to Lawrence Ouimet,
chapter chairman.
The campaign is part of a Na-
tional Red Cross effort to obtain
five million dollars for relief aid
to the war-torn country. Presi-
dent Eisenhower has given his
support to this disaster appeal.
Red Cross assistance began at
once to help save lives in Hungary,
Ouimet pointed out. There are
now over 100,000 refugees in Red
Cross camps in Austria with an
additional 5,000 in Germany.

The bases would also enable
B52s based in the United States
to go for any target in the Soviet
Union, because tanker planes could
give the bombers a fresh fuel sup-
ply just before they disappeared
over the Soviet void and another
shot in the arm as they emerged
from thehRussian hinterland on
the way home.
U.S. System Gives Advantage
Any comparison of Soviet and
U.S. abilities to hit each other's
homelands through the air must
take into account these two related
factors: the United State's exten-
sive base system and its long-per-
fected technique of air refueling.
The only foreign bases promptly
open to Russian use would be in
East Asia and the European satel-
lites. These bases, however, would
not move Russian bombers much
closer-if at all-to the continental
United States.
Since their tankers would have
to take off the same distance away
from the target as the attacking
force, refueling would give the
Russians nothing like the advan-
tage gained with this system by
the United States.

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WE AGAIN offer you special Christmnas sav-
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interest for the entire month of December
or until supplies are gone.
THESE ITEMS will be featured in our win-
dow and inside our store. Come in NOW
and make your selection. Ask for Fred or
Don to assist you.
$1850 Radiant Screen, Now 1311

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Take a tip from Warmthumb-serve yourself a full
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I-STORE HOURS DAILY 9

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