100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 05, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

0 4r mloriggatt . Daily
ixty-Seventh Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OAF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241

n Opinions Are Free
rutb Will Prevail"

"We Can Sure Do Some Liberating Over Here"
- -

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers or
the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

ESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1956

NIGHT EDITOR: VERNON NAHRGANG

4 '_

Sigma Kappa Violation:
What Are The Odds?

T MIGHT be worthwhile, in evaluating the
case against Sigma Kappa, to try to apply an,
jective standard to it.
Strange as it may seem, the action of the
gma Kappa national in suspending its chap-
rs at Cornell and Tufts - both of which had
cently pledged Negro girls - can be dis-
issed with some sort of mathematical preci-
on. Applying the methods of the social sci-
ices, the future behavior of the Sigma Kappa
ational might be predicted on the basis of its
Rst behavior by applying simple statistics,
Tlhe question is this: was Sigma Kappa's ac-
on in suspending the two chapters taken with-
it consideration of the fact that they had
>th pledged Negro girls, or, in statistical terms,
as it "random" in this regard?
Sigma Kappa's national has yet to argue that
was random, that other reasons motivated
em to suspend the chapters. But some have
dopted this line of argument, contending that
tufts was suspended for financial reasons and
ornell for violation of pledging rules.
'AKING the problem first from the stand-
point of the Tufts suspension, let us give the
ational all benefit of the doubt and draw no
nclusions as to motives from the single fact
iat the Tufts chapter had its charter with-
awn. But it was one of two Sigma Kappa
iapters with Negro members, as far as is now
nown. If the suspensions were made at ran-
m with regard to Negro membership, then
Lch of the 67 other-Sigma Kappa chapters
ould have had an equal chance of being the
cond group dropped by the national council.
In other words, there were 66 chances against
ie second suspension involving the Cornell
iapter and only one for it. By odds of at least
:1, then, Sigma Kappa stands indicted of
ispending the Cornell chapter because it
.edged a Negro.
Vhen psychologists refer to something as

"proven", they speak in terms of five per cent
or three per cent margins of error. The case
against Sigma Kappa is basd on a margin of
error of less than 1.5 per cent.
it is not "absolute" proof, but neither science
nor law relies on "absolutes", basing their con-
clusions on "facts" reached "beyond a reason-
able" doubt or to a given margin of error.
IF SIGMA Kappa's 1955 recognition meant
recognition of the national, then there is
little question that the national is violating
University regulations when it "prohibits mem-
bership in the organization on the basis of race,
religion or color."
If it is felt, on the other hand, that only the
local was recognized in 1955, and that the na-
tional's policies are only relevant insofar as
they affect local policy, then the question is
one of the national's power over the local.
But if past behavior is to be taken as he ba-
sis for predicting future behavior, then the odds
are also approximately 66:1 that the Univer-
sity's chapter would be suspended should it
pledge a Negro girl. How this affects local Sig-
ma Kappa's policy is a function of any verbal
understandings between national and local, or
in the absence of these, simply the local's dem-
onstrated desire to remain a member of the
national and its ability and perceiving the im-
plications for itself, of the mathematics of the
Tufts and Cornell suspensions.
In other words, given a demonstrated if not
an articulated national policy, one might well
ask if the local group has any choice but to
"prohibit membership in the organization on
the basis of race, religion or color," regardless
of personal beliefs of the members.
Such a course would place it in violation of
University, regulations, and this is the ques-
tion - and the odds'- which Student Gov-
ernment Council must consider tonight.
-PETER ECKSTEIN

~T,~ ib'~epillyJ *id'
aie o ,
- -r
4 4
WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:'
Congress Thailand Junket
By DREW PEARSON }>

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 18 to January 29, 1956
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "time
of class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict,, the con-
flict is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular
schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instruc-
tor as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

Time of Class
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
(at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3

Time of Examination
Monday, January 21 9-12
Thursday, January 24 9-12
Saturday, January 26 9-12
Friday, January 18 9-12
Saturday, January 19 2-5
Saturday, January 19 2-5
Tuesday, January 29 9-12
Tuesday, January 22 2-5

MONDAY
TUESDA'

Y

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Wednesday, January 23
Friday, January 25
Monday, January 28
Saturday, January 19
Tuesday, January 29
Tuesday, January 22
Monday, January 28

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Atlantic Rift Closing

THE dangerous rift in the North Atlantic Al-
lihnce appears to be closing, to some degree
at least.
Apparently yielding at last to pressure from
the United States and the United Nations,
Britain and France have sounded retreat for
their military forces in Egypt.
News of the decision to withdraw was well
received, not only in the United States, but by
the Alied troops on the Suez Canal, who now
can look forward to Christmas at home.
UN Secretary Dag Hammarskjold has ex-
pressed the hope that the troops will be with-
drawn and the UN International Police Force
in "full control of Port Said,, by Christmas."
The major difficulty in the UN project now
appears to be the lack of cooperation on the
part of President Gamal -Abdel Nasser and the
Egyptian government, and the reluctance of
the Israeli command to follow the Allied ex-
ample ,and pull out of the Sinai Peninsula and
the Gaza Strip.
Israel regards the Gaza Strip as historically
a part of Palestine, and is apparently deter-
mined to hold it. She has already begun re-
vamping local governments in the Strip.
Israel has announced the withdrawal of
three brigades - an estimated 12,000 men ---
from Egypt, and the movement of other units
to points more than 36 miles from the canal.
THESE withdrawals are encouraging, but not
sufficient. The diplomatic pressure which suc-
ceeded in achieving the exodus of Allied forces

should now be directed toward forcing a simi-
lar pull-out of Israeli units.
When the armies of individual nations are
out of Egypt, and the UN police force is in con-
trol of the Suez Canal, the way will be open
to negotiations for a final settlement of the
problem of canal operation.
Peace in the Middle East may be in sight.
-EDWARD GERULDSEN
Hill Concert Audiences
A Bit Discourteous
T HE CONDUCT of Hill concert audiences
leaves much to be desired. Especially notice-
able is the consistent tardiness of many concert-
goers at the performances.
If one can overlook the inconvenience result-
ing from late arrivals who always seem to sit
in the middle of the row, it is often difficult
to ignore the disturbed reaction of the perform-
ers when streams of people led by student
ushers hurry to their seats after the beginning
of the performance. This is not only distracting
to the performers but discourteous to those
who are already seated.
Then there is the amateur conductor who,
while not wishing to demonstrate his talent
to the audience at large, distux'bs his immediate
neighbors by waving his arms violently.
These audience problems, while admittedly
not large ones, nevertheless do lessen enjoy-
ment of the concerts.
-CAROL PRINS

THE current junket to Thailand
by members of Congress to at-
tend the Inter-Parliamentary Un-
ion has a couple of interesting
coattail riders.
They are Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Swanson, who four years ago fig-
ured in this column when Con-
gressman Ernest Bramblett, Re-
publican of California, was re-
ported to have received kickbacks
from his secretarial staff and oth-
ers. Among the others was Mrs.
Margaret Swanson who began
drawing $4,700 a year from the
congressman in 1949, though she
never went near his office.
Later Bramblett was tried by
the Justice Department and con-
victed of taking salary kickbacks.
Among those who testified was
Mrs. Swanson who told the court
that she was placed on Bramb-
ltt's payroll to "remove the sting
of criticism" from the fact that
the congressman's wife had been
on the payroll.
* * *
SHE ADMITTED on the witness
stand that she gave FBI agents
the impression that she did some
work for Bramblett, though she
hadn't. She claimed that when
she told the FBI none of her sal-
ary was kickbacked to the con-
gressman she "honestly felt" the
cash went to Mrs. Bramblett.
Her husband, Irving Swanson,
also testified to having helped ar-
range for his wife to draw a check
as Bramblett's secretary, then
turn cash back to Bramblett.
Swanson was then Republican
minority clerk in the House of
kepresentatives. More recently he
has been a member of the cam-
paign brain trust of the GOP Na-
tional Committee and an adviser
to right-wing Republican senators.
Now he has turned up, with Mrs.
Swanson, as a member of the U.S.
delegation staff attending the In-
ter-Parliamentary Union in Bang-
kok, Thailand. Just how two peo-

ple who were parties to payroll
finagling in Congress should "e
peerless {examples of the parlia-
mentary system in the USA might
be hard for foreign countries to
understaid.
DRY CLEANERS and laundry-
men around the nation are follow-
ing the lead of the Washington,
D.C., Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Association in helping collect
clothes for the Hungarian people.
Tom Doster,. President of the
Laundry-Dry Cleaning Associa-
tion of Gastonia, N.C., has just
telephoned to say that his mem-
bers had started a drive to col-
lect clothesclean them, and start
them on their way to Vienna, now
the center of Hungarian refugees.
This was followed by a telegram
from James A. Stoddard, presi-
dent of the Dry Cleaners Guild of
New Jersey at Waldick, N. J., satt-
ing that his organization had just
sent a telegram to Governor Mey-
ner of New Jersey, pledging the
New Jersey dry cleaners to clean'
clothing free of charge and trans-
port it to any designated point in
New Jersey en route to the Free-
dom fighters of Hungary.
* * *
THE EGYPTIAN embassy has
been flooding newspaper offices
with a pamphlet which claims to
document British-French atroci-
ties against Egypt.f
The documentation consists of
an "eye witness account" by a
Swedish newspaperman, Perolow
Anderson, who is described as a
n e u t r a 1 photographer-reporter
who covered the Korean War. The
Egyptian embassy, however, ne-
glects to mention certain pertin-
eiit facts about this "neutral" ob-
server-
Here are some of them: He cov-
ered the Korean war as a corres-
pondent on the North Korean
side. It was impossible to do this
without being a Communist or a
pro-Communist.

In 1942, Anderson was also a
member of Sweden's Brown Shirt
of Nazi Party. He volunteered as
a photographer with the German
army in Finland..
LATER HE BECAME a German
agent, affiliating himself with the
Red Horse League, a wartime Nor-
wegian underground which helped
Norway patriots escape from the
Germans. Having wormed his way
into the underground, Anderson
worked against Norwegians and
with the Germans.
From this job, Anderson went to
Stockholm where he became a po-'
lice officer. In October, 1945, he
was arrested in the British zone
of Germany masquerading as an
American newspaperman. The
British deported him to Sweden.
Later, Anderson turned up as a
correspondent covering the Kore-
an War from the North Korean
side, and the next the Western
world heard of him, he was in
Port Said as a correspondent for
the official Egyptian magazine
"Scribe." This is put out by the
Egyptian Ministry of National
Guidance.
Anderson's first dispatch from
Port Said was filed by Tass, the
Soviet news agency. Andersonj
claimed to be accredited to the
International News Service, but
it turned out that INS, though re-
ceivingsdispatches from him, did
riot distribute them,
This is the newspaperman whom
the Egyptians are now quoting as
an independent eye witness to
British-French atrocities.
THE PUBLIC Health Service
has sent a fellow refugee to Camp
Kilmer, N.J., to attend the medical
needs of the Hungarian refugees.
He is Dr. Isidor Abrahamer, who
fled from Nazi Germany and,
again, from Czechoslovakia after
the Nazis moved in.
Copyright 1956 by Bell Syndicate, Inc.)

Botany 2
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 15, 23,
182, 183
Economics 71
Economics 72
Economies 51, 52, 53, 54, 101,
\153 k
English 1, 2
French1 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31,
32, 61, 62
German 1, 2, 31
Latin 21
Political Science 1
Psychology 31, 190, 235
Russian 1
Sociology 1, 60, 101
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 301S, 401, 401M,
4015

Friday, January 18
Friday, January 18
Tuesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 29
Tuesday, January 22
Monday, January 21
Thursday, January 24
Saturday, January 26
Thursday, January 24
Monday, January 28
Friday, January 25
Thursday, January 24
Wednesday, January 23
Saturday, January 26

2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

Thursday, January 24 7-10 p.m.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Bus. Ad. 11
Bus. Ad. 12

Tuesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 29

2-5
9-12

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

A. E. 1, secs. 1, 3
A. E. 130
C. E. 20, 21, 151
C. E. 22
C. E. 23
C. E. 70
Drawing 1, 3
Drawing 1s, 2
Drawing lx
E. E. 5
E. M. 1
E. M. 2
English 10, 11
I. E. 100, 110
M. E. 2
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 301S, 401, 401M,
401S
Physics 53

Thursday, January 24
Wednesday, January 23
Monday,. January 21
Thursday, January 24
Friday, January 25
Saturday, January 26
Friday, January 25
Saturday, January 26
Thursday, January 24
Friday, January 18
Friday, January 18
Wednesday, January 23
Monday, January 21
Monday; January 21
Friday, January 25
Thursday, January 24
Friday, January 18

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
7-10 p.m.
2-5

4

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.

Federal Aid No Answer

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

i

APPEAL for federal police aid by the Ander-
son County School Board in Clinton. Ten-
nessee, is an inadequate solution to the city's
school integration problem.
Sine the SupromA Court school integration
Editorial Staff
RICHARD SNYDER. Editor
RICHARD HALLORAN LEE MARK:-
VditoriaJ Directr~ CitV Editor
GAIL GOLDSTEIN ................Personnei Director
ERNEST THEODOSSIN.............Magazine Editor
JANET REAR.TCK ....Associate Editorial Director
MARY ANN THOMAS................Featurrea Editor
DAVID GREY .............. Sports Editor
ERICHARD CRAMER.......... .Associate Sports Editor
STEPHEN EJLPERN.........Associte Sport* Editor
VIRGTNTA ROBERTSON.,......,..... Women's Edito
JAN FOW1,ER ............Associate Women's Editor
ARLINE LEWIS..............Women's Feature Editor
'OHN HIRTZEL ............... Chief PhotographeL
Busines StafL
DAVID SILVER. Business Manager
MILTON GOLDSTEIN., ...Associate Business Manager
WILLIAM PUSCH................ Adertising Manager
-CHARLES WILSON............... .Finance Manager

order went into effect in Tennessee last Janu-
ary 4, there has been an increase in tension
and riots. Despite the dogged attempts of Clin-
ton authorities to settle the issue, school racial
integration has been unsuccessful,
The board has asked the federal government
to help police the Clinton High School after
local efforts by the state troopers and National
Guardsmen to quell the mobs have failed.
This use of force has been unsuccessful in
alleviating the problem. Whether on the na-
tional or local level, force is not the answer
to changing the hostile attitudes of the Clinton
residents toward the integration order. Use of
the additional force asked by the school board
will create only more ill feeling and assaults.
The issue is a local one and should be settled
by the local authorities. There is no immediate
way for the federal government to settle the
problem except through force and Clinton peo-
ple have already proven their impregnability
to such acts
The integration problem i complex one
and like every complex problem, can be solved
only through time It will take understanding
on the part of the community toward: the
problem of the Negrc before the integration
order will be accepted. Such understanding and

LETTERS #
to the
EDITOR . .
Letters to the Editor must be signed
and limited to 300 words. The Daily
reserves the right to edit or with-
hold any letter.
Might Mo've!
To the Editor:
CONGRATULATIONS to the
South Quad ' rs The quest
for self-detervrr --n is hearten-
ing wherever a appears Unfor-
tunately it is likely that your
shouts will go unheeded and your
desires frustrated We have seen
the pattern before
It might be noted, however, that
more thar two hundred students
or; campus own their own houses
end completely contro' thei own
destinies No dc they discrim-

STANLEY QUARTET:
Chamber Music Given
Fine Performance

LAST night the Stanley Quartet
gave their customary perform-
ance. That is, they were direct in
their approach to the music, vig-
orous in interpretation, and tonal-
ly lean. Not much more need be
said about the ensemble as a
unit: since anyone can go to hear
them with open ears and discover
for themselves the honest, fre-
quently attractive musicianship of
the group.
THE MAIN item on the program
was Darius Milhaud's Quintet No.
2. for which Clyde Thompson
joined the Quartet on the double
bass. The composition it more a
divertissement thar, anything else
and acquires an added depth from
the addition of the bass.

played the work with a properly
light, intellectual. Dave Brubeck-
on-the-string-quartet-touch, ex-
cept for an occasional dry quality
on the violin that approached ex-
cessive raspiness.
*; * *
A HAYDN QUARTET of great
wit and humor. (Op. 76, No. 1)
opened the program. The Quar-
tet's approach to this work was
incisive and mechanical: and
made up in energetic drive and
seriousness. what we missed of its
light insouciance and graceful
irony.
The rigorous parodies of cen-
tral European folk melodies, how-
ever, were realized brightly, and 1
found thi; democratic approach
to Haydn curiously amenable

No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for adjust-
ment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between Decem-
ber 10 and 21 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulle-
tin board of the School of Music.
COURSES OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
a SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

DAIL
aOFFICIAL

General Notices
Air ForcebROTC Stanine "AFOQT"
Tests will be given in Kellogg Audi-
torium on Thurs. and Fri., Dec. 6 and
7, starting promptly at 7:00 p.m. ALL

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan