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November 07, 1956 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1956-11-07

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WE"D DAY, NOVEMMOt 7, 1958

THE MCMGAN DAILY

PACIVonw

WEDN!SDAT NOVEas al L7, 156 11W MRlTi l £ I.v li1I'UT

rain iA nAUU

ra

PRESIDENT EISENHOWER:

Eisenhower

Gains Prestige Before Political Careers First Term

*EIS~!s

Dwight David Eisenhower was(
already richly invested with pres-
tige and honor when a record
popular vote swept him to the
Presidency.
His war exploits had won him
the acclaim of many nations and
the overflowing good will of his
fellow citizens.
Most men would have gladly
settled for less.
Presidency and Its Problems
When he was inaugurated,
Eisenhower became not only the
nation's Chief Executive but also
the leader of the free world's
strategists.
There were many problems. The
bitter war in Korea was in its
third year. The cold war with
communism was unabated. The
United States and Russia were
working feverishly on producing
the deadly hydrogen bomb. At
home, enormous political stakes
were involved. The success or
failure of the first Republican
administration in two decades
rested largely in his hands.

1

This sect also was called the
River Brethren because it be-
lieved in baptism by immersion
in rivers.
One of President Eisenhower's
ancestors, John Peter Eisenhower,
helped to supply General Wash-
ington's army at Valley Forge. As
a result of that service, Eisenhower
was eligible for membership in the
Sons of the American-Revolution.'
The general's father, David,
didn't take to farming and opened
a general store in Hope, Kans.
The store failed and he took his
family to Denison, Tex., and
went to work as a railroad me-'
chanic. It was in Denison that
General Eisenhower was born
October 14, 1890.
Nicknamed 'Ike'
The massive Bible of the Eisen-
hower family recorded the name
of the third son of David and Ida
Eisenhower as David Dwight, but
iis mother reversed the baptismal
record to Dwight David and called
him Dwight.
Ike was a big, raw-boned boy
when he finished high school at
18. There was, nothing in his
record to hint that he would be-
come a great commander. For a
time, he helped his father, worked
as a fireman and refrigeration
plant helper, and did odd jobs on
the farms around Abilene.
Eisenhower became a soldier by

chance. He took competitive ex-
aminations ft . both the United
States Military and Naval Acad-
emies, finishing first in the An-
napolis examination and second
in the West Point.
He ,received appointment to the
Naval Academy, only to discover
he would be a few months past
the age limit of 20 when the term
started.
By a quirk of fate, the highest
man on the Military Academf1y list
was unable to accept appointment
and Eisenhower, as second high-
est, received it. He graduated 61st
in a class of 164 in 1915.
Some years later Eisenhower
finished at the top of his class of
275 of the Army's most carefully
selected officers at the Command
and General Staff School, Fort
Leavenworth, Kans.
Mother Opposed Wars
Reports that Eisenhower's
mother objected to his entering
West Point were set at rest at a
presidential press conference. In
later life she joined Jehovah's
Witnesses, an organization with
definite pacifist tenets in its pro-
gram.
Eisenhower said he knew at the
time he entered West Point that
she believed the world didn't need
to resort to wars-and believed it
very passionately - but she never
said a single word to him to pre-

vent his going to the Military
Academy.
His father, the President re-
lated with a grin, was Pennsyl-
vania Dutch, with all the temper
of a Pennsylvania Dutchman, and
there was nothing pacifist about
him.
The President himself, though
he had achieved greatness as a
warrior, was dominated by a de-
sire for peace.
Addressing a World Christian
Endeavor convention, he stressed
his conviction "that all men, all
masses, do truly long for peace."
"It is only governments that
are stupid," he declared.
After finishing West Point, he
was assigned to the 19th Infantry
at Fort Sam Houston, Tex. It was
there, at a party, that he met
Mamie Geneva Doud. Her parents,
who lived in Denver, happened to
be visiting in Texas at the time.
The lieutenant and Miss Doud
were married in Denver on July 1,
1916. A year later they had a son,
Dwight Doud, who died of scarlet
fever at the age of 3. A second
son, John Sheldon Doud, was born
in 1922. He became a West Pointer
and saw service in Europe during
World War II and later in Korea.
President Eisenhower is the
grandfather of four - David,
Barbara Anne, Susan and Mary
Jean. -

President's Illnesses
Twice while he was President,
Eisenhower suffered serious ill-
nesses that raised the question
whether he would seek a second
term. But after each attack, he
announced he remained a candi-
date for the Republican nomina-
tion that was his without a chal-
lenge.
Long Sidestepped Politics
For years Eisenhower. had
brushed aside all efforts to get
him into politics.
At apress. conference shortly
after his return home from the
war, he said: "All I want is to
be a citizen of the United States
and when the War Department
turns me out to pasture that's all
I want to be. I want nothing else."
He added that "it is silly to talk
about me in politics"
That year there were serious
movements in both political par-
ties to nominate him, but he re-
fused to be considered.
He consented to enter the poli-
tical, arena in 1952 after only
some influential Republicans had
started a campaign to make him
the party's standard-bearer and
voters in several states had en-
dorsed him in primaries - many
by write-in votes. Gov. Thomas
E. Dewey of New York, the 1944
and 1948 nominee, was among
his energetic supporters.
His smashing victory in the
November election launched him
on his third "crusade."
He received more votes than
any man before him had ever got.
His Democratic opponent, Adlai
E. Stevenson, in losing, had a
larger total by three millions than
President Truman amassed in
winning four years previously.
Eisenhower's total of 33,936,252
provided a plurality of 6,621,260.
He had 442 electoral votes to 89'
for Stevenson. In winning he
broke the "Solid South" by carry-
ing Florida, Tennessee, Texas and
Virginia. In all he carried 39
states to Stevenson's nine.
Brilliant Military Record
In entering politics, Eisenhower
closed the books on a brilliant
military career.
Before becoming Supreme Com-
mander of the Allied Expedition-
ary Forces at the close of 1943,
Eisenhower had led the Allied
force which in a single year snat-
ched North Africa from the Axis,
exterminated Marshal Erwin Rom-
mel's once dreaded Africa Corps,
conquered Sicily and squeezed
Italy out of the war.
Family Roots in Germany
The Eisenhowers originated in
Germany, where the name was
Eisenhauer and meant ironhewer.
They belonged to evangelical and
pacifist groups that developed in-
to the Mennonite sects. Persecuted
for their religious beliefs, some of
the family fled to Switzerland
early in the 17th century.
About 100 years later the first
Eisenhowers emigrated to America
and settled in Pennsylvania,
where they established a sect+
known as the Brethren in Christ,]
an offshoot of the Mennonites.

Niso Had Good Training for Post
As Controversial Ikse Heir Apparent

Richard M. Nixon became one
of the nation's most potent-and
controversial - political figures
just 10 years after he first was
elected to public office.
Nominated in 1956 for a sec-
ond term as vice-president, he
emerged as heir apparent to Pres-
ident Eisenhower as leader of the
Republican party. Some Demo-
crats, including presidential nom-
inee Adlai E. Stevenson, suggested
the real power already was moving
into Nixon's hands.
If this was true, Nixon had in-
tensive training for the job.
He served as salesman for the
Eisenhower administration at
home and abroad. He sat in for
Eisenhower on more occasions,
probably, than any previous vice-
president, and had more access
to official information.
Democrats Protested Little
Democrats who complained he
used to' take the "low road" in
campaign tactics, while Eisen-
hower took the "high road," pro-
tested little about the 1956 Nixon
speeches.
Controversy still swirled about
him, however. With Eisenhower
the first American president
barred, under the 22nd constitu-
tional amendment, from seeking
a third term, the Democrats
pitched much of their campaign
against Nixon as the natural in-
heritor of the Eisenhower mantle.
Time and again Stevenson
asked his audience if Nixon could
be trusted to handle such awe-
some responsibilities as the hy-
drogen bomb. The meaning of the
Democrats was plain if not often
stated: what if Eisenhower, twice
stricken by serious illness, should
be replaced by Nixon before 1960?
Ike Praises Nixon
Eisenhower obviously thought
the country ran no risk. He praised
Nixon s t e a d f a s t 1y even when
White House disarmament aide
Harold E. Stassen sought to
"dump" the Vice-President in the
1956 convention as a detriment to
the GOP ticket.
Stassen's campaign never got
off the ground. It collapsed before
the convention ended and Nixon
went on to wage one of the most
extensive campaigns the Ameri-
can political scene has known.
Almost from the day he took
office, Nixon served as the Presi-
dent's eyes and ears as well as'
his stand-in.
Nixon presided over Cabinet

meetings and National Security
Council sessions when the Presi-
dent was absent. An able and per-
suasive speaker and a man of un-
usual personal charm, he repre-
sented Eisenhower at dinners and
receptions, carried a heavy load
of electioneering, made good will
trips abroad and was a hard-
working trouble shooter.
Election Color
By The Associated Press
Election day, despite its gen-
eral seriousness, has its funny
moments too.
Mike Lloyd of New Ulm,
Minn., swallowed the Republi-
can line whole. Yesterday he
was carrying around in his
stomach a small button saying
it will be "Ike in '56."
The only disappointment for
the GOP cause, which had few
disappointments, was that Mike
wasn't old enough to vote. The
five-year-old found the button
in his older brother's bedroom
and accidentally swallowed it.
A physician saw the button
in a fluoroscope and said,
"Everything will come out all
right."
Meanwhile, in Port Huron, a
staunch Republican farmer who
declined to be named boiled at
the thought of those new-
fangled voting machines."
His wife had mistakenly pul-
led the Democratic lever after
voting Republican all her life,
and election officials refused to,
discount her ballot and let her
vote over again.
When President Eisenhower
suffered a heart attack in the'
autumn of 1955, Nixon was ready'
for emergency duty if needed.
There is an old political saying
that the Vice-President is sepa-
rated from the Presidency "by,
only a heartbeat." Eisenhower
had permitted Nixon to prepare
himself Well for continuing ad-j
ministration policies in the event
he should ever be called to the
top job.
Swift Political Rise
Nixon was just 11 days past
his 40th birthday when he be-
came Vice-President, the second
youngest ever to hold that office.
The Constitution fixes 35 as the1
minimum age. Many members
of the Senate were old enough
to be his father.

He had had a meteoric politi-
cal rise. His election, as the run-
ning mate of Eisenhower, came
only six years after his first po-
litical venture in 1946 when he
won a seat in the House of Rep-
resentatives. He served there for
four years and then was elected
to the Senate. Two years later
he was on the national Repub-
lican ticket.
Family Background
Nixon took the oath of office on
January 20, 1953, on two old fami-
ly Bibles, one of which, dated 1729,
had been brought to this country
from Ireland by William Milhous,
Nixon's great-great-great grand-
father.
Nixon was born January 9, 1913,
in Yorba Linda,' Calif., a small
citrus-growing town near Los An-
geles. His father, a native of Ohio,
had gone West in 1906. He was a
Los Angeles streetcar motorman
-"until I hit an automobile"--
then a citrus rancher and finally
operator of a general store and
filling station at Whittier. His
mother, the former Hannah Mil-
hous, was born in Indiana.
Senator Nixon's' grandfather'
was a Democrat, but his father,
Francis Anthony Nixon, joined the
Republican ranks. The latter ex-
plained:
"My father, Samuel Nixon, was
an Ohio Democrat. But one day Ii
rode a horse in a William McKin-
ley parade. McKinley himself
(then governor of Ohio, later
President) admired my horse and
told me so. That did it. I voted
Republican for McKinley then and
ever since."
The Nixon family, of Quaker
stock, were hard-working, plain
American folks. Besides Richard,
there were four other sons, two of
whom died at early ages.
In 1940 Nixon married Miss Pa-
tricia Ryan. "My wife was an Irish
Democrat when I married her and
didn't become a Republican until
after I was elected to Congress,".
the Vice-President admitted with a
laugh. They had two daughters,
Patricia and Julie.

Highlights
Events during the Eisenhower
Administration included:
A truce stopped the fighting in
the Korean war after three years.
The number of American dead
exceeded 30,000, including 23,345
killed in action.
Both the United States and
Russia developed hydrogen bombs
having the force of millions of
tons of TNT. The two countries
engaged in a grim race for superi-
ority in this devastating weapon.
More than 80 countries agreed
to set up an international agency,
under United Nations auspices,
for peaceful development of atom-
ic energy.
Atom spies Julius and Ethel
Rosenberg were executed for con-
spiring to deliver vital secrets to
Russia during World War II. They
were the first civilians in Ameri-
can history to be put to death by
the Federal Government for
either espionage or treason.
The death penalty was author-
ized for peacetime espionage, a
crime previously punishable by a
maximum of 20 years' imprison-
ment.
Communist party was outlawed
and stripped of its legal rights.
The Supreme Court ruled that
segregation in public schools of
the nation was unconstitutional.
It ordered desegregation "as soon
as practicable," but fixed no dead-
line. Integration proceeded at a
slow pace in much of the South.
The United States started build-
ing a series of supercarriers cap-j
able of delivering nuclear weapons
to the far corners of the earth.
Atomic-power submarines capable
of circumnavigating the globe
without refueling became a re-
ality.
Plan announced for launching
earth-circling satellites to gain
new information about the uni-
verse. Possibility of manned space
ships studied.
Germany and Austria became
sovereign nations again, 10 years
Safter World War II ended.
Heads of government of the Big
Four nations met to discuss world
tensions, but the friendly "spirit
of Geneva" engendered at the
meeting lasted for only a brief
time.
Congress authorized use of any
necessary force to save Nationalist
Chinese-held Formosa from the
Chinese Reds.
Eight nations signed a security
pact that flashed a red stop light
against Communist aggression in
Asia.
Rigid, high price supports for
basic farm crops replaced with
a flexible system; soil bank plan
adopted.
Employment reached record
total exceeding 65/2 millions.
The federal power policy was
changed to place more responsi-
bility on localities and less on
the Government for supplying
power needs.
Social Security benefits were'
increased and coverage extended
to an additional 10 million per-
sons.
Retirement age for women was
lowered to 62, and disabled work-
ers were made eligible for full
benefits at 50.
The minimum wage for workers
in interstate commerce went from
75 cents to a dollar an hour. An
estimated 2,100,000 workers got
pay increases.
The Air Force Academy took
its place beside West Point and
Annapolis. It was located at Low-
ry Field, Denver, until completion
of permanent buildings at Colo-
rado Springs,

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11 :00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
HELP WANTED
PART TIME HELP-11 A.M. to 12 Noon,
11 A.M. to 1 P.M., 12 or 1 P.M. to 6 or
1, 2 or 3 nights a week 8:30 to 11 or
12. $1 per hour. Apply in person after
1:30 P.M. Drake's Sandwich Shop,
709 N.U. )H51
MALE STUDENTS for craft shop, boys
clubs, and life guard at Ann Arbor
YMCA. Contact Mr. Cole, NO 2-6564.
)H49
WAITERS, WAITRESSES part-time,
evenings and/or weekends. Experi-
once preferred but not essential. Call
in person. The virginian Restaurant,
313 S. State. )H48
WANTED-Window trimmer, part-time.
Phone H. A. Woodke, NO 3-4013. Wil-
kinson's Luggage Shop. )H47
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part-
time, Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company.
Phone NO 8-9382. )H20
ROOMS FOR RENT
LOOKING FOR Male students for
roommates, cooking privileges, 1a
block from campus. 417 E. Liberty.
)D24
CLEAN, attractive two room suite for
2 or 3 boys. No cooking. Inquire at
1011 E. University. )D27
ONE BLOCK from campus, newly fur-
nished room for two men. 523 Pack-
ard. Call NO 2-1443. )D17
ONE OR TWO GIRLS-2-room suite.
Close to campus. NO 2-0047. Ask for
Linda. )D22
USED CARS
1956 FORD CONVERTIBLE
Fully equipped - Special Item -_
Excellent condition. NO 2-4329. )N37
Always a Bargain at
DON PRINGLE - DODGE-PLYMOUTH
331 So. 4th Ave.
Tel. No. 2-5523. Ypsi, HU 3-2536
)N25
1956 FORD, V-8, Ford-O-Matic, fully
equipped. $1850. Call NO 2-2783 af-
ter 6 p.m. )N32
'37 Chevrolet two door Sedan, color
light blue-new clutch, new battery
-heater-seat covers-5 good tires-
runs perfect-$75. Stimson, 400 E.
Liberty, NO 2-3740. )N23

PERSONAL
KRAMEAI AND MAENTZ make cover of
next week's Sports Illustrated. News-
stand price 20c. Subscribe through
Student Periodical (NO 2-3061) at
Be - yes 8e a copy. )F42
FUR JACKETS & coats sold at fraction
of original price. Style samples, repo-
sessed, restyled. Sale starts Oct. 15.
Margaret Shop, 519 E. Williams. )F20
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted tuxedos converted to
single breasted, $18, or new silk shawl
collar, $25. Overcoats $18. Write to
Michaels$Tailoring Co., 1425 Broad-
way, Detroit, Michigan, for free de-
tails or phone WOodward 3-5776. )F1
REAL ESTATE
THE BUTTS & SWISHER CO.
REALTORS
FOR ANN ARBOR WOODS
(Washtenaw at Stadium)
Models Open Daily 10-8
Office 214 E. Washington NO 3-0800
)Rl
MISCELLANEOUS
FOX MOTEL
(Formerly Boyd's)
2805 E. Michigan HU 2-2204
)S4
FOR RENT
KAY MODEL C-1 lass never used. Ideal
for combo mike. NO 2-3189. )C28
PARKING Space for rent; close to
downtown campus. Inquire 603 East
Ann. )C-25
ONE OR TWO girls-2 room suite.
Close to campus. NO 2-0047. Ask for
Linda. )D22
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Pickett 1000 slide rule, leather
case. If found phone Judy Rising, NO
3-3943. REWARD. )A51
LOST-Green Schaeffer fountain pen
with name engraved on band. Please
phone rm. 4508 Alice Lloyd. )A30
LOST-Michigan NCA Hockey Ring.
1955 at Ferry Field. Call NO 2-5725.;
)A49
BUSINESS SERVICES-
WILL TYPE student papers, thesis
reports, etc. NO 3-8065. )J28
Just received
9x12 COTTON RUGS
$29.95
Many beautiful Colors to select from.
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERING
207 E. Washington
NO 2-9418
Open Monday evenings until 8:30
)J27
WASHINGS - Also Ironing separately.
Specialize in cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and deli-
very. Phone NO. 2-9020. )J23
EXPERIENCED Operators in Beauty
work of all kinds. Ritz Beauty Salop,
605 E. William, NO 8-7066. )J3
WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
2007 South State NO 2-33,;0
Bumping and Painting
)J8
Rentschler Studio
FINE PHOTOGRAPHY
since 18901
319 E. Huron
Ann Arbor's only Master Pnotographer

ROOM AND BOARD
GOOD HOME COOKED Meals, reason-
able at private student house. Howard
Wentz 1319 Hill. NO 2-6422. )D21
FOR SALE
A rgus 03
Telephoto lens
$35 used
Purchase from
PURCHASE
CAMERA SHOP
1116 South University
NO 8-6972 )8103
TROPICAL FISH - plants, acquarium
supplies, tarantulas, hamsters, and
singing canaries.
University Acquarium
328 X. Liberty NO 3-0224
COMPLETE 4x5 Pacemaker Speed
Graphic outfit. Includes 4.7 Optar
lens. "x" points, flashgun, coil, one
seven-inch, two five-inch reflectors,
rangefinder, 12 film holders, film
pack adapter, extension flash, wide
angle lens, filters, sunshades, carry-
ing case. Complete outfit $225.00.
Phone NO 2-0368 after 5 P.M. )BIO5
RARE VIOLINS
AND BOWS
ALL ACCESSORIES, STRINGS,
REPAIRS
MADDY MUSIC
508 E. Williams
NO 3-3223
)B74
DIAMOND RINGS-45% to 55% off -
Special offer to students. Buy direct
from graduate student who is factory
representative in this area. One
carat solitaire engragement ring
$299.95, and many other fine values.
10-day trial period with money com-
pletely refunded if not satisfied. Call
Harry at NO 2-2684. )B201
BOY'S ENGLISH BIKE. Good condi-
tion. Call NO 3-8463. )B100
NAVAL OFFICER'S uniforms (cheap).
Four piece silver tea service (new)
$25, antique mahogany chest $35,
electric shoe polisher $10. NO 3-8167.
)B99
ARMY-NAVY type oxfords-$7.25; sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 East Washington.
)B12
THE PLEDGE CLASS
of TAU DELTA PHI
announces
The FIRST successful
escape in the history
of said fraternity
from a prank
Any denials of said
fact are made only
to save said face!

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Daily
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)JiO I

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LEE
CLUE: Established by a wealthy Boston
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ANSWER
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PUZZLE NO. 17
CLUE: This midwest university is con-
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ANSWER
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City State
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PUZZLE NO. 18
CLUE: A railroad magnate gave$1,000,000
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Among its alumni is writer Robert Penn
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ANSWER
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