100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 06, 1956 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SDAY, NOV EOMER 6,1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

TTJERBAV. 1~OVE lWI~K1L 6. tOSS THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

Public Eye
On Situation
Overseas
(Continued from Page 4)
of poverty," e.g. farming and small
business.
But the Republicans have, albeit
to a lesser degree, tried to change
voter attitudes, in this case toward
economic issues, making a spirited
bid for labor rank-and-file sup-
port, largely on the basis of four
generally very prosperous years,
In both cases, the effort appears
to have had little ffect. Steven-
son's proposals have had a limited
Impact on the voter, and this ap-
pears to have been largely nega-
tive. The Republican arguments
hat they were the party of peace
through strength fit better into
the pre-conceptions the voter
brought to the campaign, and
they seem to have emerged - as
much as anything has - the domi-
nant force in the hydrogen and
draft-debates. And the generally
pro-Democratic allegiance of labor
seems to be holding rather firm
' under constant campaign remind-
ers of the Great Repression.
Limited Impact
A third unique ,aspect of the
campaign also centers around
Stevenson's campaign. At least
not since 1912 - when Theodore
Roosevelt's "New Nationalism" and
Woodrow Wilson's "New Freedom"
programs were put before the"
voters - has a candidate expound-
ed at such length and detail a
program of social legislation as
Adla Stevenson did in his "New
America" papers. While presented
in the least appealing form pos-
sible - long, generally colorless
statements, suitable for publica-
tion only in Tthe New York Times
-and limited to a few key issues-
natural resources, public health,
education, problems of the aged,
and' fiscal policy-they represent
a far more explicit program than
Franklin Roosevelt's "New Deal"
of 1932 or any of its campaign
predecessors.
Little Applause
Again, the Stevenson proposals
show no signs of having caught'
fire. The phrase "New America"
draws little applause at the most
enthusiastic of Democratic rallies
and its analogy to the "New Deal"
seems lost on all but the candidate I
who proposed it.
If there is any consolation in
historical parallels, both sides can
find It on this election eve. Of the1
five former rematches in our his-
tory-in which the ptevious elec-
tion's candidates were again pitted
against each other - Thomas
Jefferson defeated President John
Adams in 1800, Andrew Jackson
defeated President John Quincy
Adames in 1828, William Henry
Harrison defated President Martin
Van Buren in 1840, and former-
President Grover Cleveland de-
feated President Benjamin Harri-
son in 1892, but the most recent
rematch, William Jennings Bryan
lost to President William McKin-
ley.
Sixteen to Seven
Of our three military Presidents
who ran for re-election-Washing-
ton, Jackson and Grant - all were
unsuccessful and Teddy Roosevelt
might be added as a fourth.
And of the other who sought to
return to the White House -
Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Mon-
roe, Lincoln, Cleveland, Taft, Wil-
son, Coolidge, Hoover, Roosevelt
three times, and Truman - only
Cleveland, Taft and Hoover were
unsuccessful, making a grand total

of 16 out of 23 requests to return
to the White House granted by
the voters.
History, then, can be found on
both sides in the election, even if
the pollsters cannot, but, even it
would seem to give the edge to
Dwight D. Eisenhower.

.- -.--,.--+.mnt mnmm nm. n+:ne.m<m!;:mrcrrtessrrrn :::;:..''3E??.^''.^:.?...:..:tr,"rr-m:eq:r.rnr.:m., ..--s=r,,,-aa-nee:m:...... .....
_.:..':.'.:.. ."......-" ::"":°: :::::::-r:;"::"::::: : :::.::...:: :::" ::::::::::::. .^c iiiEfiiiEiiiiii(eiiiiiiiiii°iiiEi Oiiii::2iEfi ...... iiri:::::::::::::a
iiii°ii:iiir'cicepiii iS'r.FeiiiifitSi'r'iiESF.iE
., .. ::..::... ......... .... .. ......: .............:..... 1 i 2iiiEiiiiiiiE:i.....i............_"":"::°::"::::::::::^::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::a:::
' ......
:::=s :::.::.::::.:::::" " Es ii's EISEN H O W ER sst: ::::.: "::::::::::::::::::::a
...........
!. '.. it '. ', ii. kt 'iiii:iiiiiEiiiiiiiiii^iiiiifiiiiiEfiiiO ""'0"'iiiiiiiiitiiii°:::i : .i Siiiiiii'r' .. "izi6ii iiiiiiiiiii'r'0 ( :::: "
1
t
ti:
_ ......................................................................................... na, .......... ....._............. ':::::EiiEcii4iiiiii:?::?C fig
... .. ........ ...... .........................................................t..................................................................................................
iiiii^iii
...........i .... iEiiiif :iiEiiiifiiiEi'eEiiiiiiiiiEiiiic iiii:i is 3... :r' .EEfiE35iEtiiEffPE3EEEEPSEPi;EE'r" '::::::::::r ..;;...,..:' (Eiiiii
, - .:....:::::::::s::::" ........ EISENHOW ER 442
................
::i:i =::::!:::::" :::: ::..::e siii iii ii i i ii .....
:...."..:::. .... .. .. ... .. .
::::::::...... ..:.:.:.:..... ,v af
...4.....2::::.s.::::.:.:.:.:." ::::.. : ::::::: :::::::::::::::::::::: :'::::::::::::::::. :... ":::::::::
::::: ....::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ......... ....... ........................ ...........
.............. ............
::::::::::::::::::::::::::i ............:
..... :::::::::::::::::::::::
.i.. ::Z:.:
iXii ii

Adlai Faces
Stiff Fight
For Votes
Adlai Stevenson faces an uphill
fight as he and the Democratic
Party try to construct an electoral
vote majority today.
President Dwight D3. Eisenhower
swept the nation in 1952 by an
electoral vote of 442 to 89, based
on a popular vote margin of six-
and-a-half million. Four years lat-
er the task of overcoming Eisen-
hower majorities in enough states
to give Stevenson the 266 elec-
toral votes he needs still looks
formidable.
Of the nine states with 89 elec-
toral votes Stevenson carried in
1952, all but Kentucky with10
seems safe. In addition he seems
assured of Tennessee - 10, Mis-
souri-13, and Oklahoma - eight,
and is the probably victor in Texas
-24, Virginia - 12, and Kentucky
10. This would bring his probable
total to 156.
The New York Times is even
dubious of Stevenson's ability to
carry Kentucky, but it gives Eisen-
hower only the thinnest of leads
in Pennsylvania and Minnesota.
Given the sketchy sampling meth-
ods employed by The Times, such
margins are open to question, and
Pennsylvania's 32 votes and Min-
nesota's 11 must be counted a
strong Stevenson possibility.
They would bring his total to
199, 67 electoral votes short of a
victory. From this point on, The
Times must either be dead wrong
or Stevenson is a dead duck.
The 67 votes could come from a
number of possible states, all of
which President Eisenhower now
appears to be holding. The total
might be reached by adding Mas-
sachusetts - 16, Florida - 10,
Michigan - 20, and California -
32, a total of 78 more, 11 more
than would be required.
For California, which most poll-
sters consider nearly safe for the
Republicans, could be substituted
Arizona - four, New Mexico -
four, RhodeIsland - four, and
Stevenson would have exactly
the 266 votes he needs. Nevada's
three might even widen the mar-
gin a speck.
Illniois' 27 votes or Ohio's 25
would also be a welcome addition
to the Stevenson collection, but
they too are considered in the
President's pocket. For that mat-
ter, so is the election, with The
Times actually finding 285 elec-
toral votes clearly in the Repub-
lican column.
Actually, late developments in
the world could conceivably cause
a strong shift in either direction,
making the Times' figures -even
assuming their erstwhile accuracy
- a mere jumping off point for
a Presidential victory.

U of
READ

'OTERS

r
r

0

T

ESE

FAC

S

THE FOLLOWING FIGURES WERE TAKEN
FROM THE RECORDS *OF THE MICHIGAN
LEGISLATURE. THESE ARE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS AND ARE AVAILABLE FOR ANYONE
TO SEE.

1956-51
1956-57
1956-51
1956.51
1956-51

University of Michigan request for OPERATIONAL
APPROPRIATION ONLY, including $1,190,573.00
for SALARY INCREASES:
Governor Williams' recommendation for operational,
appropriation to U. of M.:
Amount of money recommended to be CUT
from University's request by Governor
Williams:
OPERATIONAL APPROPRIATION granted to the
University by the REPUBLICAN LEGISLATURE:
Amount of increase in appropriation by RE-
PUBLICAN LEGISLATURE over Governor's
recommendation:

$ 21,30,120.00
26,160,000.00

S

910,120.00

$ 21,500,000.00

s

140,000.00

, ,,w,,: o evaluate the all-round career
advantages offered by the widely diversifiec
activities at Divisions Qf North American Aviation, Inc.
FI RST ST EP: GET THE FACTS in man-to-man

S Days Left
until
S.G.C.
Elections

interviews, on campus NO
As a graduate In }
Engineering, Phys-
ics, Applied Math. or
allied subjects you
need complete, fac- %'r >. > r
tual information to
help you make a
sound decision in
choosingyourcareer.!
Get the facts in a AUTONETI(t
man-to-man interview with our representative.
Let him tell you about our unique placement
and training devised to help your potential
develop rapidly in a company where continued
expansion has doubled the number of employ-
ees in 5 years. Your possibilities are wide and
varied, as you will see from these brief notes
on the 4 Divisions:
AUTONETICS creates automatic controls and
electro-mechanical systems of a highly inter-
esting nature. Work includes research, design,
development, manufacture and testing; you
will become a part of the latest advances in
inertial navigation
and guidance, fire
and flight controls,
analog and digital
computers.
ROCKETDYNE is
building power for
ROCKETOYNE outer space-large,
liquid propellant rocket engines. The Field Test

VEMBER 7,8
of his specialty In one week than in year of
"conventional" practice.
ATOMICS INTERNATIONAL is pioneering in the
creative use of the atom. If you are able to
meet the high requirements for this work, you
can help introduce a new industrial era.
Atomics International is designing and building
varied types of nuclear reactors, for both power
and research, with the practical experience
gained by 10 years in the field.
MISSILE DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
Long range missiles, including the interconti-
nental SM-64 Navaho, present problems of the
most fascinating
nature. Speeds
materials and
functions now be-
ing dealt with were
only theoretical a
few years ago. The
work is vital; the
opportunities for
ATOMICS INTERNATONAL you, as a creative
engineer, are correspondingly great.

This means that the SALARY INCREASES received by University Em-
ployees this year were made possible by the "sound thinking" REPUBLICAN
LEGISLATURE.
IN ADDITION the appropriation for the physical expansion of, and the
capital improvement program for the UNIVERSITY was increased by more
than a HALF MILLION DOLLARS by the REPUBLICAN LEGISLATURE
over and above the recommendation of the Governor.
Which party is your friend? Which party is making sure that the UNI-
VERSITY is receiving its fair share of appropriations and will continue to
receive its fair share?
These things were done for YOU by the REPUBLICAN LEGISLATURE
that Governor Williams has constantly derided and blamed for his own
short-comings and failures,
ALBERT E. COBO, the REPUBLICAN candidate for GOVERNOR has
pledged his full support to the REPUBLICAN WAY of getting things done
in the best and most efficient manner with finances for Michigan's Univer-
sities ad Colleges one of his primary considerations.

Ie
MOTOR CONTROL 0
We Will Interview On
Friday
November 9, 1956
ENGINEERS
0 Electrical
* Mechanical
I Industrial

CONTACT YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE TODAY
Make an appointment NOW to see North
American Repre-
sentative on cam-
pus. OR WRITE:
Mr. J. Kimbark ,
College Relations.
Representative,

LOOK AT THE RECORD
Then Vote

a

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan