100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 17, 1956 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

17 . 165

T

Varied Events Planned
For J-Hop Weekend

AILY - PAGE ?IW
Upperclassmen Warn Freshmen
To Study Now for Final Exams

Hoping to appeal to a wide
variety of student interests, the
J-Hop committee has scheduled
events ranging in atmosphere from'
the ski lodges of the north to the
plantations of the south for the
annual J-Hop Weekend, Feb. 10,
through Sunday, Feb. 12. -
In addition to the main event
"Rebelaire" on Friday, the com-
mittee has scheduled a weekend
ski trip and an informal dance
and a splash party on Saturday.
The orchestras of Les Brown
and Tommy Alexander will pro-
vide music for dancing at J-Hop
to be held from 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.
TICKET SALES
Due to a limited number of
tickets still available, J-Hop
ticket sales have been extended.
Students may purchase tickets
from 1 to 5 p.m. today, tomor-
row and Thursday at the Ad-
ministration Building.
on Friday, Feb. 10, at' the Intra-
mural Building.
Les Brown Band
Known for their appearances on
the Bob Hope radio and television
shows, the Brown band has also
made numerous recordings and
appeared at dances throughout
the country.
In addition to the director,
Brown, four trumpets, four trom-
bones, five saxophones and a five
piece rhythm section make up the
organization. Vocal selections are
rendered by song stylist Jo Ann
Greer.
The Alexander orchestra which
will share the spotlight with the
Brown band is described by mem-
bers of the J-Hop committee as
"one that is meeting with enthusi-

astic response from all who have
heard it in its rirst rew months of
operation."
New Organization
The new organization looks back
to the standards set by the Good-
mans and Dorseys of other years.
Although it doesn't try to copy
them, it attempts to get the light
swing feeling which they achieved
on the "up-tempos."
The sound features four trom-
bones and two baritone saxophones
in unison, one octave below the
lead trombone.
The band is known for its brass
ensemble effects and often fea-
tures saxophone jazz solos. Most
of the arranging is done by Alex-
ander.
Orchestras Will Alternate
The two orchestras will provide
a continuous evening of dancing,
alternating on the bandstand dur-
ing the event.
Decorations for J-Hop will re-
volve about the "Rebelaire" theme.,
A southern setting will be pro-
vided by magnolias, green smilax
leaf sprays and fountains against
a background of southern planta-
tions, bayous and New Orleans
street scenes.
Southern Scenes
The color scheme of gold, white
and green will be carried out in
green draperies and gold and white
silhouettes of southern scenes.
For the first time this year as a
feature of J-Hop Weekend, a rki
trip has been scheduled on Satur-
day and Sunday to East Tawas.
For those staying in Ann Arbor
for -the weekend a splash party
will be held from 2 to 4:30 p.m.'
Saturday at the women's pool and
an informal dance from 9 p.m. to
1 a.m. that evening at the League.

HELEN APPEL PHYLLIS ANDERSON

VIRGINIA SCHWARTZ

By POLLY VAN SCHOICK
"Don't clutch! Start- studyng
early!" These words from a senior
coed seem to be typical of the
advice being given to freshmen
who are preparing for their first
final exams at the big University.
Since this is the time of the year
when freshmen experience those
butterflies of apprehension or per-
haps slight sensations of being
burned alive, University sopho-
more, junior andsenior students
are quite willing to offer their
experienced advice on the matter.
Senior Dave Stewart felt that
too many people study too long
and tend to get stale. He went on,
to say, "Do your daily assignments
during the semester, go out and
have fun now because if you study
too hard you get clutched."
One sophomore -coed - reported,
"I study the day and the night
before, and it doesn't work." Her
advice was to cover your material
twice if it is at all possible, once
before exam week begins and once
shortly before your exam.
Take It Easy
Another advocate of taking it
easy before finals is Bob Wells, '56.
Bob said, "Take it easy, don't be-
come a hermit.", His attitude on
studying for finals is, "It's the last
chance to review and enjoy the
course."
The first thing you should do is
to catch up on what you haven't
done and then review by seminar,
reading over your bluebooks and
~notes and looking over old exams
to see sample questions.
Another coed suggests that
freshmen take their last minute
studying in stride and get eight
hours of sleep the night before.
Eating a good breakfast the morn-
ing of the exam and not going to
the P-Bell the night before were
other items stressed.
John F. Muehl, assistant pro-
fessor of English,. advised the
freshmen to look behind the spe-
cific question asked and find the
intent behind it. In English exams
he felt the most difficulty. for
students lay in their not reading
the questions correctly.
Read Q estion
It's not just'what material is
needed, but also what viewpoint is
invited. The use of the material
varies as to whether the question
says "list," "discuss," or "criti-
cize."
He concludedhby recommending
to the student the wisdom of shap-
ing the answer before writing.
"See the end before you start."
Other students had ulterior
motives in giving their advice.
Judy Jennis, '56, chairman of
interviewing and nominating com-
mittee of the League quoted a
rhyme:
"The more you study
The more you know.
The more you know -

Ill

The more you forget.
The more you forget
The less you know,
So what's the use of studying?"
Selfish Motives
Her motive? To get more people
interested in League work, of
course.
A few students polled gave quite
radical answers, such as one four
pointer who felt cramming is all
right for some subjects, but it
should be done in style.
"Stay up all night sudying, get
no sleep, take the exam, and then

you can poo out when you.finish."
He explained his answer with the
further comment that if one breaks
up his cramming with sleep there
will be little retention of newly
learned facts.
They all agreed on what exam
takers should do once in the exam
room. They said the student should
have all the necessary equipment--
pens, erasers, and pencils. He
shouldn't waste too much time
on one problem, daydream, or wor-
ry about the outcome of the exam.

Sf4LE

II

ON ALL STOCK

20%y off

11

I

NDIA ART SHOP

GAIL LUNDSTROM

ANNE ROBINSON JANET ROBERTS

CONGRATULATIONS:
Wedding Plans Announced by Parents

330 MAYNARD STREET

II

Reveal JGP Tryout Times

Tryouts for the Junior Girls Play
will be held from 3 to 6 p.m. and
frem 7 to. 10 p.m., Monday through
Friday, Feb. 13 to 17, and from
9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 18.
Nancy MacDonald, general chair-
man of JGP, and the entire Cen-
tral Committee urge all junior
women to try out for the play.
According to Sue Arnold, direc-
tor, there are numerous speaking,
singing and dancing parts avail-
able.
Tryouts will be held in separate
rooms in the League. Room num-
bers will be posted on the bulletin
board. ,
Written by Sally Miller, this
year's script has been completed
and the various committees which
will help to produce the show have
been set'up.
Gibbs To Present
Two Scholarships
Katherine Gibbs, a secretarial
training school, is again offering
two national scholarships for out-
standing senior women.
The scholarships each total $1,-
185, which includes full tuition for
the secretarial training course of
$685 plus a cash award of $500.
They may be used in either the
Boston, New York, Montclair, or
. Providence school.
One candidate for this award
may be recommended from each
college or university. The scholar-
ship is not open to anyone who
does not have this official endorse-
ment.
Information concerning the com-
petition may be obtained from the
college placement bureau.
The candidate's college academic
record, personal and character
qualifications, financial need and
potentialities for success in busi-
ness will be the basis for the
scholarship committee's decision.

Written, directed and produced
by junior women alone, the play
Will be given in honor of graduat-
ing coeds on Senior Night, Thurs-
day, March 22, and will be pre-
sented to the entire campus on
Friday and Saturday, March 23
and 24.
Entering Students'
Orientation Week
To Include Tests
, Entering freshmen and transfer
students will find much of their
time already planned out for them
during second semester Orienta-
tion Week from Monday, Feb., 6,
through Saturday, Feb. 11.
These students will hear an
address by University President
Harlan H. Hatcher Monday morn-
ing, Feb. 6, at the freshman as-
sembly. That same evening langu-
age placement tests will be given
to incoming students interested in
continuing in foreign languages.
A free Cinema Guild movie will
also be given that night.
Thursday, Feb. 9, Stockwell Res-
idence Hall will give a mixer for
the new students.
Other things which entering stu-
dents will find filling their week,
but as yet have not been given a
set time, will be the health ex-
aminations; various tests, includ-
ing English; counseling ahd regis-
tration.
There will be 22 coed orientation
group leaders and 28 men leaders
selected from those who signed
up. These group leaders will get
free meals during the week and
will be able to register early.
Headingthe orientation program
for the Women's League is Pat
Mooney. For the Men's Union,
Herbert Karzen is the leader of
the orientation schedule. He is
assisted by Russell Raymond and
Chuck Schwartz.

Appel - Lexa
The engagement of Helen Eliza-
beth Appel, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Edgar Appel of Washington,
D.C., to Frank James Lexa, Jr., son
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lexa, Sr.
of Cicero, Ill., was recently an-
nounced.
Miss Appel is a junior in the
literary college and affiliated with
Alpha Delta Pi.
Mr. Appel is planning to receive
his Master of Business Administra-
tion degree next month. He is a
former president of Sigma Nu.
The couple plans to be married
on Saturday, April 7.
Anderson - Proctor
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Anderson
of Muskegon announce the en-
;agement of their daughter, Phyllis
Darlene, to Conrad Proctor, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Proctor of
Pontiac.
Miss Anderson is a junior in the
School of Nursing, and Mr. Proctor
is a freshman in the University
Medical School.
The wedding will take place on
Saturday, June 23.

Schwartz - Wepfe r
The engagement of Virginia May
Schwartz to Gordon Glenn Wep-
fer, son of Mr. and Mrs. William
Wepfer of Merrill, Wisc., is an-
nounced by her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. De Witt Schwartz of East
Aurora, N. Y.
Miss Schwartz is a junior in the
School of Nursing.
Mr. Wepfer is in Graduate School
studying nuclear engineering, and
is a member of Phi Kappa Tau.
The wedding date has been set
for Saturday, June 16.

Robinson - Curran
Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Robinson
of Mendhamn, N. J., announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Anne Van Gieson, to John Roger
Curran, son of Mr. John Curran of
Millburn, N. J. and the late Mrs.
Curran.
Miss Robinson is a senior in the
College of Pharmacy and a mem-
ber of Sigma Kappa.
Mr. Curran is also a senior in
the College of Pharmacy and af-
filiated with Sigma Nu.
- * *

quality cleaning

Individual thorough,
expert attention
given to each garment

FREE MINOR REPAIRS:
" Trouser cuffs brushed
and tacked

* * Roberts - Johnson
Lundstrom - Morrow The engagement of Janet L.
Gail Lundstrom's engagement to Roberts, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
John M. Morrow, Jr., son of Mr. Edgar Roberts of Grand Rapids,
and Mrs. John Morrow, Sr. of Ann to Terry R. Johnson, son of Mr.
Arbor, is announced by her par- and Mrs. Earl Johnson of Chicago,
ents, Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Lundstrom Ill., was recently announced.
of Manistique. Miss Roberts is a junior in social
Miss Lundstrom is a senior in work in the literary .college.
the School of Music, and affiliated Mr. Johnson is in Graduate
with Alpha Gamma Delta. School working on chemical engi-
Mr. Morrow is a senior in the neering. He is affiliated with Sigma
School of Education. He is a mem- Tau, Tau Beta Pi, Phi Lambda
ber. of Sigma Chi, Druids, Sphinx Upsilon and Sigma Xi.
and the University football team. The couple plans to be married
A July wedding is planned. on Saturday, June 16.

- Seam-rips repaired
* Buttons replaced

"Cleaning the way you have always wanted it done"
Gold Bon'd Cleners

515 E.!William

NO 8-6335

I-

,4c,'44Camnpu

JGP-There will be a meeting
of the Junior Girls Play Central
Committee at 5 p.m. today at the
League.
INTERNATIONAL CENTER -
Heman Benny Mochtan, of the
Indonesian Ministry of Education
and Culture, here on a State De-
partment Foreign Leader exchange
program, will spend today and to-
morrow at the University as part
of a five-month American tour.
* * *
INTERNATIONAL CENTER -
Persons interested in an Inter-
national Center tour of New York
and Washington, D. C. during
spring vacation are requested to
contact Mrs. Marguerite Randall
of the International Center as soon
as possible.

ad

if

Your Discontinued Textbooks

are worth real money!

If sold to Ulrich's WITH your currently good ones.
YOUR BEST DEAL-FIGURE IT OUT
Ulrich's sell your discontinued books to over

600 college bookstores. This way

we get the

H V

highest possible prices for YOU. At least 25%

A 9

Aft - 0 r

I

I

® U - l.Ats.. V.1dh &U6 .fL

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan