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December 14, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'THE DIRTIEST EVER':
Colorado Humor Magazine Banned

By TED FRIEDMAN
The University of Colorado's hu-
mor magazine, "Flatiron," was
banned by the board of publica-
4 tions last week after their latest
Issue was described as "worse than
obscene" by the Denver Post.
The 'issue, advertised as "the
dirtiest ever," had been complete-
ly sold out.
The board action was the culmi-
nation of a turbulent history of
the publication. Last year the fir-
ing of its editor for "too much
emphasis on sex and alcohol" was
described in Life magazine.
Later last year when a Flat-
iron photographer invited an "ex-
otic dancer" from a local night
club to campus, a riot ensued in-
rolving hundreds of students.
Featured Cartoons
The current issue features car-
boons, limericks, and photographs.
A Denver Post editorial asks, "If
this is the literature, hardly of
higher 'standard than the most
berated comics, that appeals to
the C. U. student body, why is
that student body itself so taste-
less?

"The Thanksgiving Flatiron, as
the production of supposedly at
least normally-developed college
students, is downright moronic."
Colorado University President
Darley said he was in full agree-
ment with the board's action and
feels "no future magazines of this
type should be published on cam-
pus.
"I have been strongly in favor
of banning the Flatiron ever since
the Thanksgiving issue came out,"
Darley said.
Editor. Challenges Banning
The Flatiron editor, Jim Schaff-
ner, challenged the banning. He
said the president's assistant's "job
is to keep derogatory Junk out of
the Denver smut sheets so that
the legislature has a rosy view of
things in Boulder.
"This university had great press
relations before he (the president's
assistant) was put to work as the'
moral FBI of the campus," Schaff-
ner claimed.
Concerning the Denver Post
editorial, Schaffner said, "It is an
excellent piece of criticism but not
very accurate.

Accuse Post Editorial Writer
"This guy is an editorial writ-
er," Schaffner.continued, "it's his
job to wave a flag."
However Schaffner did admit,
"The last issue of the Flatiron
stunk."
The board members defended
their action by stating that the
magazine "has not and. presently
does not serve any worthwhile pur-
pose."
Don Harlan, commissioner of
publications, explained that em-
barrassing publications of this
type hamper the university's ef-
forts in obtaining development
funds.
ASFCs Work
To Be Told
Lewis Hoskins, executive secre-
tary of the American Friends Serv-
ive Committee, will speak at the
new Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
at 8 p.m tomorrow.
Hoskins, who earned his PhD in
history at the University in 1943,
will speak on "The AFSC at Work
in a World of Tension."
The Friends groups are nation-
wide organizations for Quakers in
the United States and extend be-
yond international lines. They,
attempt to relieve tension and do
constructive relief work.
Hoskins was professor of history
in Pacific College in Oregon and
spent three years in China for the
AFSC.
Three Professors
Granted Leaves
Prof. Theodore M. Newcomb of
the psychology department was
granted a leave of absence yester-
day by the Regents.
The Regents granted Prof. C.
Theodore Larson of the School of
Architecture a sabbatical leave for
first semester of next year.
Prof. Algo D. Henderson, of the
School of Education, was granted
a one-year sabbatical leave to-al-
low him to visit and study uni-
versities in other countries.

Travel 'Talk
To Be Given
Tomorrow,
For the benefit of those whose
plans for the near future include
a trip to Europe, the Union is pre-
senting its semi-annual travel talk
at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 38
of the Union.
The discussion is planned as a
follow-up to a recent SGC meet-
ing aimed at convincing people to
travel abroad.
"We're going to cover more per-
sonal aspects," Fred Williams,
chairman of Union Social Com-
mittee remarked, "and give hints
on what to do, where to stay and
especially how to have money."
A panel of five students who
have recently travelled in Europe
will participate in the talk, which
is free to all University students.
Each member will stress a dif-
ferent country and tell of his ex-
perience with a certain mode of
transportation.
European movies and foreign
cuisine will follow the discussion.

Only THREE more Days
to- buy
LIGHTERS WATCHES
Ronson Hamilton
Kreisler lgin
Zippo Bul
TRAVEL & DESK
CLOCKS WATCH BRACELETS
MICHIGAN JEWELRY
HALLER 'S
JEWELERS
717 N. University Near Hill Auditorium

-Photo-University News Service
WINNER-Peter Goshia, '58E, (left) receives a $500 -scholarship,
one of the top prizes in Time Magazine's collete sales program.
Dean of Men Walter B. Rea presents the check while John Hale,
director of West Quad, Gosia's residency, looks on.

'CELADON' WARES:

4

SThe Michigan Dai

Chinese Porcelain Exhibit
Qn Display at Museum

Co me to us for 0
Original Xmas Gifts
* DISTINCTIVE JEWELRY
* CIGARETTE CASFS U
* CHINESSE JACKETS
* ORIENTAL TRAYS AND VASES
Open every evening until 9
INDIA ART SHOPv
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om <y m <=o=:o=-o ><= 0

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SANTA SAYS

By JIM SMITH
r An exhibit of Chinese porcelain
opened recently in the rotunda
of the University Museums Build-
ing.
The exhibit is under the charge
of Mrs. Kamer Aga-Oglu of the
Orient Division of the Museum of
Anthropology and consists of cela-
don and "blue and white" porce-
lains of Chinese and Siamese ori-
gin. The porcelains were given
to the museum by Evett D. Hester
of Chicago who acquired the Ori-
ental wares while in the Philip-
pines 'as a U.S. foreign service
representative.
This collection has been added
to another belonging to the Unit
versity making the largest archaeo-
logical collection of wares made
in China and Siam for export in
the western world.
Found in Philippine Graves
These particular porcelains were
found in graves on the Philip-
pine Islands whose inhabitants
buried a person with all his earth-
ly possessions. The' porcelain
wares were among these Philip-
Says Reason, Faith
Do Not Conflict
Beginning his lecture with a
comment about "a certain wist-
fulness in my colleagues who are
not over the hump of intellect
when they think about religion
Prof. Frank Huntley of the Eng-
lish department spokeyesterday
on "Christianity and Intellect -
A Contradiction?"
"There is no conflict between
reason and faith," he said. Science
and religion use intuition and
ratiocination, and other faculties
of the mind, and there is no reason
why they cannot be enjoined.
Prof. Huntley said the problem
of joining religion and science be-
gan being thought about in 3 A.D.
"But the problem has been dis-
cussed until 1955," he added.
"Man must find all the knowl-
edge he can," Prof. Huntley said,
"and reading all the books about
science, all the literature, and
reading the Bible will only broaden
his Christian outlook."

pines' most valued belongings.
One's wealth was determined by
his porcelains.
'Celadon' Named For Shepherd
'Celadon' denotes the heavy
green glazed ware made during
the T'ang dynasty (618-906) to the
seventeenth century. These dur-
able porcelains were made parti-
cularly in the province of Cheki-
ang. The name is believed to
come from the name of the shep-
herd, Celadon, a popular charac-
ter in a French play of the sev-
enteenth century, who wore a
gray-green stage robe which re-
sembled the Chinese porcelain.
Finney To Speak
Prof. Ross Lee Finney, of the
School of Music, will comment at
the "Forum for New Music," a pro-
gram of contemporary chamber
music, at 8:30 p.m. today at the
Detroit Institute of Arts.
There is no admission charge.
Organization
Notices
Engineering Honor Council: Petitions
may be picked up in 259 WE, Dean
Emmon's office, and are due Jan. 4.
s s
Hiliel Foundation: Beginning and
intermediate classes in Hebrew instruc-
tion, 8:00 p.m. today, Hillel.
Religious committee meeting, today,
4:15 p.m., Hillel.
* s s
11 Circolo Italiano: Program of Italian
music, Dec. 15, 8:00 p.m., League.
Lutheran Student Association: Carol-
sing and Christmas party, tonight, 7:30
p.m., Lutheran Student Center, Forest
and Hill.
Michigan Union: "Union European
Travel talks," Rm. 3, Union, tonight,
7:30 pin.
* * *
Michigan Union Student Office: Phil-
osophy Dept. Student-Faculty coffee
hour, Terrace Room, Union, today, 4:30-
5:30 pm.
Westminister Student Fellowship:
Christmas vespers, Dec. 15, 7:00 p.m.,
Presbyterian Church Sanctuary.
Morning devotions and breakfast,
Dec. 15, 7:00 a.m., Presbyterian Student
Center.

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