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December 14, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDA7

....
. ....

AILROAD EMPLUYEE:
Operator Tells of Job'

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
last in a series of two articles on
the Ann Arbor Railroad Ter-
minal.)
By VERNON NAHRGANG
While Ann Arbor's railroad ter-
minal rests placidly at the foot of
State Street, the employes and
workers in and around it are con-
stantly changing.
Yard men, baggage handlers,
porters and ticket sellers come and
go as the years pass. But, as us-
ual, there's an exception to the
rule.
In this case, he's the telegraph
operator, who has been with the
railroad and the Ann Arbor sta-
tion longer than anyone else. He
has seen generations of workers
comeand go from various jobs at
the depot.
Sitting in his cluttered, closet-
like office on the track side of the
building where he can see the
trains coming and going, the op-.
erator, Percy H. Phmoss, pulls
switches, rings bells and buzzers,
sends and receives messages by
phone and teletype, and announces
trains.
Quotes 'Biggest Wreck'
"Biggest wreck we ever had
around here was about nine years
ago," the 67-year-old operator
said. "That was when, a freight
train piled up under the bridge."
He pointed to the auto bridge that
crosses above the tracks a few
hundred yards from the terminal.
"Took quite awhile to get that
untangled," he explained. "Only
one person was killed, tough.
That was a bum who was riding
the freight."
Phmoss, who has been the tele-
graph operator at the Ann Arbor
station since 1935 and has been
with the railroad almost 50 years,
told of some of his experiences
with the company.
Phmoss Recollects
His job has many small details
to it that entail keeping track of
the various trains and their times.
He recalls that trains were small-
er, but there were many more of
them during World War II, mak-
ing a lot more work.
Phmoss, who is working a few
years past his pension, recalls the
prohibition days. "The bootleg-
gers used to throw their whiskey
off the trains from Toledo," he
said.
"They'd wait for the train to
slow down at a curve, and then
throw their one-gallon metal con-
tainers into a ditch. Then they'd
come around and pick them up
later.
Tracks Rumble
Outside the operator's office, the
tracks rumbled as an express train
sped closer to the depot. The
building trembled as the train
slowed to a stop, blowing its
whistle.
Phmoss got up to go out on the
brick platform to speak to a mem-
ber of the train's crew.
At the other ena of the halted
train, the baggage men were un-

Education
Changing
Newspapers
By TED FRIEDMAN
Mass education is changing the
basic concepts of the newspaper,
Ralph R. Reed, state editor of the
Detroit News, said in a lecture to
the Department of Journalism yes-
terday.
"The old 'top sergeant' type of
editor is out the window," he said.
"Education is causing a lot of
people to think and causing a lot
of interest in things a few years
ago people weren't interested in."
People no longer receive news-1
paper positions by being "recom-
mended by a friend," Reed said.
Before a person is hired his back-1
ground is thoroughly checked.
"It's a rare thing to see some-;
body fired because ordinarily the
screening is so thorough."
He suggested the place to start
a Journalistic career is not on a
metropolitan daily but in a small
town newspaper. "There are only
a certain number of good jobs in
the editorial department" of a
large newspaper.
Reed said reporters should not
be afraid of being accused of
"slanting the news."
"Be a, watchdog," he advised.
"Don't let them tell you you're
slanting the news when you print
the facts. Often what has appear-
ed to be a slanted story has not
been slanted at all."
He emphasized the importance
of raising the level of newspaper
writing. "You're writing for the
masses." He warned future report-
ers to stay away from over-stand-
ardization.
Reporters must discover their
own styles and develop them, he
added.
Reed has been on the Detroit
News staff for 27 years. He began.
his career as a printer's devil and
began reporting at one dollar a
week.
He has worked on papers in
Muncie, South Bend and Indian-
apolis.

No Loot
EVANSVILLE, Ind. (A')-Mrs
Loretta Smithhart started back-
Ing up when a 6-foot robber
demanded cash in her West
Side grocery store, and the rob-
ber followed her.
They backed through the
store and into her apartment;
and then through the apart-
to its front door.
Mrs. Smithhart burst out the
door and screamed for help.
The robber left without loot.
Law Contest
The Henry M. Campbell compe-
tition ender the s o so rhin f

University students take books
home during the Christmas holi-
days for two reasons: to impress
their parents and to conscientious-
ly catch up in their studies.
Answers to a random survey tak-
en around the campus seem to
bring out a negative feeling of
apathy towards the thought of
continuing term paper labors dur-
ing the time spent at home.
"I don't know, I guess I'll take
one or two books home but I don't
really think I will get anything
done," a coed remarked.

Another engineer recalled,
"Thanksgiving vacation I got more
work done than ever before and I
intend to do even more during
Christmas." He has an A in five
subjects and is flunking a sixth.
Social Life Interferes
Many find that little sisters'
screams and the television set do
not provide the best atmosphere
for studying for a Zoology exam.
Parties and numerous social af-
fairs continually arranged at this
time of year appear much more
exciting at times, and will often
conquer the most resolute spirit
and iron will.
"All things considered," decided
a coed, "it might be wise to con-
template the advice of the faculty
counselors: that vacation might
be an ideal time to pull together
subject material and really pre-
pare for finals."

Holiday Book Travel.
Has Different Meanings

1
i
1

Mllethe Law Schl will move into the Flunking This Year
When asked if he was planning
quarter-final stage at 7:15 p.m. to take any books home over va-
today in Hutchins Hall. cation a harried engineering stu-
The contestants will debate the dent replied, "Yes, one or two. I
Sherman and the Clayton Anti- didn't take any home last year but
Trust Acts. There are sixteen de- I am going to this year." Change
of his attitude was explained with
baters remaining in the race, half the statement: "I'm flunking .
of whom will be eliminated tonight. few things this year."

Prof. Wilson0
Named Head
Of G
Prof. James T. Wilson was ap-
pointed chairman of the geology
department yesterday by the Board
of Regents.
He will replace Prof. Edwin N.
Goddard.
Prof. Leigh C. Anderson was re-
appointed chairman of the De-
partment of Chemistry and Prof.
Lewis S. Ramsdell was reappointed
chairman of the mineralogy de-
partment by Regents yesterday.
t
rAndy says:
Don't close your eyes to
the possibility of going to
EUROPE this summer.
Just because you don't
want your style cramped
by a "guided" tour.
After three weeks with
A M E R I C A N YOUTH
ABROAD you will know
the ropes and will be able
to explore the continent
on your own.
$335
Call your agents:
Andy Knight
NO -3225

RMAR VIEW - The track side of Ann Arbor's Train Terminal
is a familiar sight to Percy Phmoss.

loading crates and boxes from one
of the cars. Passengers hurried
toward coach and Pullman cars.
For five minutes there was activi-
ty on the platform.;
Then, as soon as it had come,
the train left. The baggage men
returned to their building to sleep
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLruETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Ill., has an opening for a trained
caseworker.- The organization places
chiidren in foster homes.
Arabian American Oil Co., (N. Y., N.
Y. hdqs.) has career opportunities in
Saudi Arabia for graduates in the foi-
iowing fields: Mech., Elect., Civil., Ind.
E., Petroleum E., Chem. E., Geology, and
Industrial Relations. Some experience
is desirable.
CHRISTMAS VACATION PROGRAMS:
Harris Trust and savings Bank, Chi-
cago, Ili., extends an invitation to visit
the bank to all 1956 graduates living
in the Chicago area. The program in-
cludes a tour through the bank and
opportunitiea to talk with officers in
the various divisions..
L. Bamberger and Co., Newark, N. T.,
is planning a Career Open House to
acquaint college seniors with career
opportunities in the main store and its
branches. Any men and women who
are interested in Executive Training for
Personnel, Merchandising, Management
or Retailing, are welcome. 10:30 Tues.
through Thurs., Dec. 27 through 29.
The First National Bank of Chicago,
Chicago, Ili., extends an invitation to
any men from the Chicago area who
are interested in the banking business
to attend the Insight and Industry
Program, to be held during Christmas
vacation.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 371.

until the. next train. Alighted
passengers hurried to waiting cars
and cabs.
Phmoss returned to his room to
telephone ahead the times of the
train's arrival and departure.
The gray brick terminal still
trembled slightly from the parting
train, then stood still. It re-
mained the same, unchanging.
Opera Scripts
Scenarios are now being ac-
cepted for the 1956 Union Opera
Script Contest.
Bill Stone, Opera publicity
chairman, announced yesterday
that scripts may be submitted any
time at the Union desk.
Further information may be ob-
tained from the opera office,
NO 2-4431.

Tonight!
MEN'S NIGHT
Gentlemen, here is your chance to
shop in "peace'-unhampered by
any of the fairer sex. Only our own
helpful people to assist you in
solving your "what-to-give-her
problems. Gift wrapping
7 the spot.
7 to 10 P.M.

NO
CWOMEN
ALLOWED

i

VULCAN TRAIN
TICKET HOLDERS
Be Sure
To Pick Up Your
RETURN TRIP TICKETS

Lawrence
(harfoos'
NO02-8419

Thurs., Dec. 15,

1955

.1

10-12 A.M.

1-4:30 P.M.

MAKI
IT A

reek Week Mf
bere will be a meeting c
ek Week central commit
p.m. today in Rm.
Union

eet A school in this area needs an ex-
perienced first grade critic teacher for
of the second semester. A Master's degree is
teatdesired.
tee at * 'Foradditional information contact
3B of the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.

i

__ !f M
'Y

t t

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

E BI
DE

,i

LETTER DAY_

4Ad~I
. "i

-avfnfA(L
GIVE A
Graphics 35

BRAKES SAFE?
DON'T RISK A LIFE...*It
Costs So Little to be Sure
Get e irestone
BRAKE SPECIAL
.. and You'll be Safe!

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