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December 06, 1955 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAT, DECEMBER S 19551

TE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGX'

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1955 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY PAfl~

s ra as a i,
i nnr r

Speeh Dept.
To Present
Brown Play
Premiere performance of the
1955 Hopwood Award - winning
drama "The Worlds of Tommy Al-
bright," will be presented by the,
speech department Thursday
through Saturday at Lydia Men-
delsshon Theatre.
Author Russell A. Brown, '56,
wrote the play last year under the
supervision of Prof. Kenneth T.
Rowe of the English department.
It received- the minor drama
award in the Avery Hopwood con-
test for spring, 1955.
Prof. Valentine Windt of the
speech department is staging the
production. Scenery and modern
costunes were designed by Mar-
jorie Smith, Grad., and Prof. Jack
E. Bender.
The "worlds" of the title refer
to the various areas of conflict in
Tommy Albright's #life. The play
is a psycholigical study of the
problems of adolescence.
Special staging effects have been
rigged for the production. The
action takes place in the living
room of the Albright home, their
front porch, a teen-agers' hang-
out and an automobile. Prof. Ben-
der has designed settings on large
platforms which roll on and off
stage quickly.
Members of Prof. Rowe's class in
modern drama have been studying
the script as part of their class
work! in the analysis of a manu-
script play.
The part of Tommy Albright
t will be played by the author. Other
members of the cast are Richard
Allen, '57, James Reindel, '56,
Thomas Crane, '56, Gertrude
Slack, Grad., Angus Moore, Grad.;
Mark Gilson, Joan Westby, '57,
Allan Knee, '56, Robert Brown,
'58, Margaret Galdonyi, '57, Kath-
erine Fodell, '57Ed, Greta Rich-
ards, '56, Ann Elderman, '57 and
Patricia Turner, '56.
Tickets are on sale at the Lydia
Mendelssohn box office for $1.20,
90c and 60c. The special student
rate. of 50c is effective Thursday.
All seats are reserved and all per-
formances begin at 8 p.m.

Cancellation
The Young Republican's meet-
ig scheduled for 7:30 p.m. to-.
morrow has been cancelled due
to the illness of the speaker,
Representative George Meader
(1t-Mich), Club president Tim
Richard, '57, announced yester-
day.
Although no rescheduling has
yet been made, Richard said
that Rep. Meader would prob-
ably speak sometime next se-
mnester.
Rep. Alvin M. Bentley will be
the club's next guest speaker,
appearing at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 13
in Room 3S"of the Union. Bent-
ley, often mentioned as a pos-
sible gubernatorial candidate,
will discuss state politics.
Stanley Group
Plays Today
"Quintet with Double Bass" by
Leslie Bassett will receive its first
Ann Arbor performance when the
Stanley Quartet plays its second
concert of the fall semester at
8:30 p.m. today in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
Dedicated to the Quartet and to
Stanley Thompson, who will play
the double bass, the composer,
Bassett, is an instructor in theory
and composition in the School of
Music.
The Quartet is composed of mu-
sic faculty members Gilbert Ross
and Emil Raab, violins, Oliver
Edel, cello, and Robert Courte,
viola.
In addition to the Basset com-
position the Quartet will play
"Quartet in C major," Op. 74, No.
1 by Haydn; and "Quartet in B
flat," Op. 67 by Brahms.

COMMERCIAL EXPLOITATION:
Experiments May Revolutionize Theory

Clubs Start

I

'55

Contest

HEADQUARTERS for
ALL WOOL

Lawrence B. Slobodkin, of Mich-'
igan's zoology department, is
presently conducting experiments
which may revolutionize the theory
of commercial exploitation.
Slobodkin's first hurdle Is to
control and understand the num-
bers and kinds of animals existing
in nature. After this is ascer.
tained, a method of exploiting
them can be determined. Exploita-
tion deals with the number of
animals which can be utilized and'
still maintain a balance for the
continuance of the species, with-
out leaving an overabundance.
Daphnia Being Studied
Artificial communities are set
up where the experimental animal,
the Daphnia, is observed. This
particular animal is used in the
experimentation because its life'
span is from one to ten days.
Therefore, results can be quickly
obtained. Populations of Daphnia
are kept in constant conditions in
an incubator, and are "fished" ac-
cording to various exploitation
systems. They are then counted
every four days with the use of a
microscope.
The ultimate goal is to find the
method for the greatest yield and
the most stable population, and to
Cater To Speak
Douglass Cater, Washington edi-
tor of "The Reporter," will speak
on "A New Look at the Power of
the Press" at 3 p.m. today in Audi-
torium C, Angell Hall.

At League
Tonight and tomorrow night are
the dates for the traditional an-
nual poetry contests sponsored by
Le Cercle Francais and Sociedad
Hispanicia.
At 8 p.m. today in the Rumpus
Room of the League, Prog. Charles
E. Koella will give the opening
speech that begins the combined
poetry contest and Christmas
party of the French club.
Prizes will be given in each of
the three divisions of the contest,
poetry for students of beginning,
intermediate, or advanced French.
Professors of the department will
act as judges.
Students from all levels of Span-
ish classes will compete for re-
cords and books about Spain in
the contest to be held at 7:30 p.m.
tomorrow in the Henderson Room
of the League.
Art ExhibiPtion.
Opens Today
The December exhibition of
Alumni Memorial Hall Museum of
Art opens today in the west gal-
lery.
"British Art in the Museum Col-
lection" will be on display through
Dec. 21. About 80 items, including
paintings, drawings, prints, sculp-
ture, and ceramics, of the 18th,
19th and 20th centuries, are on
exhibit.

BLNKT

54x72
54x72
54x72
60x80
72x84
60x80
60x80

-Daily-sam Ching
L. B. SLOBODKIN - MAY REVOLUTIONIZE THE THEORY
OF COMMERCIAL EXPLOITATION.

All Wool yellow felt Block M$........$10.00
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All Wool Extra Large Chenille Block M. .$22.50
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Ulrich S
ANN ARBOR'S BUSY BOOKSTORE
549 East University

determine what governs the rela-,
tive number of predators and prey'
in nature.
Two Similar Studies
This study is the first of its
kind. However, there have been
two similar studies, one conducted
in Australia using flies and one
in Chicago using beetles. Financial'
aid for the experiments is supplied
by the Rac1kham Faculty Research
Granrts and the Rockefeller Foun-

dation. The results of the testing,
when perfected, will possibly be
used by fisheries on a national
and international scale.
Slobodkin, who has published
several papers in technical jour-
nals, studied at Bethany College
in West Virginia, and received his
doctorate at Yale University be-
fore joining Michigan's teaching
staff in the fall of 1963.

MA

Read Daily Classifieds

Senior

women

I

New, exciting careers for college women are
opening up in the Customer Contact,
Administrative, Personnel and Technical fields
of telephone work at Michigan Bell.
For a personal appraisal of your telephone
career potentialities after graduation, visit our
representatives at your Bureau of Appointments:
ON CAMPUS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8

I

FARMER'S
MARKET
Detroit Street
Open Wednesday and Saturday
for
Farm-Fresh Fruits, Vegetables,
Poultry and Eggs

11

*

-.----~ +

Il

MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY

I.I

MY GAME ! LUCKY DROODLESI

- ""'.

-Ammummummomp

For solution, see
paragraph at. right.

THERE'S NO GETTING AROUND IT-Luckies taste
better. And there's no getting around that thing in
the Droodle at left, either-the Droodle's titled:
Lucky smoker with bum seat at football game. Poor
guy is really up against it. But he's got a swell point
of view on smoking-he smokes Luckies for better
taste. Luckies taste better because they're made
of fine tobacco that's TOASTED to taste better.
Chances are our friend in Section 28 is thinking,
"This is the best-tasting cigarette I ever smoked!"
DROODLES, Copyright 1953 by Roger Price

NEWSPAPER WORK AS A CAREER
The 2nd of 3 advertisements.
Doubtless you have heard talk of an outstanding Washington corre-
spondent or of an outstanding foreign correspondent.
The chances are you have heard very little talk of an outstanding local
reporter.
Yet an' outstanding local reporter is one of our ,most valuable citizens.
Through hard labor, he has acquired a thorough knowledge of many
important things in his community, and he has built up a reputation
for absolute integrity.

His acquaintances are wide-spread.

TOS7ED"
*f *fae 6ehi'fe.

LUCKY;
STRIKE,

m7..I.. n... --..----- .
Studentsl EA RN H25"!-

i+ s.*

Cut yourself in on the Lucky
Droodle gold mine. We pay $25
for all we use-and for a whole
raft we don't use! Send your
Droodles with 'descriptive titles.
Include your name, address, col-
lege and class and the name and
address of the dealer in your col-
lege town from whom you buy
cigarettes most often. Address:
LuckyDroodle, Box 67A,

C r* GA RET T ES

He may know, and probably does know, an able detective sergeant, a
couple of prominent business men, a flamboyant ward boss, a shy but
brilliant professor of physics, a railroad executive, a wise and well-loved
minister, an old-time civil servant in the city hall who can remember
everything that happened there during the past forty years, a leading
banker, a judge and a notable doctor.
He has acquired their trust and their respect and hence they will talk
freely with him.
He is gifted with "a sense of smell" as to what is phony and dubious.
Perhaps he never could be an outstanding Washington or foreign cor-
respondent.
Perhaps he much prefers his own line of work.
Competent performance of a local reporter's job is not easy, but it
may be attended by great satisfaction and a world of romance.
If you are primarily interested in security and starting with big pay
(and such interests are common and very natural), newspaper work as
a career does not hold much of an appeal.
If you like to work hard, to be something of an artist, to laugh and
dream a little, and never to know what is going to happen next, then
newspaper work as a career probably offers more than anything else.

I Mount'Vernon,I
II

N.Y.

i n. .1hl

m

rs

0

I I

m

THE BALTIMORE SONPAPERS

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