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December 06, 1955 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-12-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6. 1953

E-OLD QUESTION:
What Is Man And What Is His Destiny?

Rats Used to Formulate
Theories About Humans

'IIEflSr

MARY ANN THOMAS
tinued, but these questions are ba-
basic religious questions sic to the problem of the student's

serted, is to think of himself as
a creator, not as a creature. "Man

,-----

always the same: What is man
what is his destiny?" Prof.
id C. Brauer said Sunday in
first lecture of the annual
is I Believe" series.
eld in connection with Reli-
s Emphasis Week, the lecture
s is sponsored by the Student
gious Association and the
ipus Religion Council.
eaking on "What of the Fu-
?" the dean of the Federated
ological Faculty of the Univer-
of Chicago explained that al-
gh the problems are the same,
appear different because each
ration interprets them accord-
to its owh ways of life.
ich questions do not often
er the college student because
s full of exhuberance, he con-

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place in the university and his I must first see himself as he is, a

future job.
'An Age of Revolution'
"We are in an age of revolution
and insecurity," the young Luth-
eran minister warned. "When we
have so much material plenty, the
problem of finding ultimate secur-
ity becomes more acute, especially
when we base our whole security
on material plenty."
The problem of the future is that
man is tempted to locate his se-
curity in the wrong places, he
added. Some people denounce
materialism and call for a return
to spiritual values, but we can't
really do that unless we learn to
live with material advances.
It is not easy to live in the con-
dition of modern America and re-
sist the temptation to place God
on our side, right or wrong, he
admitted. Another temptation is
our tendency to base our accepti-
bility to God on our material suc-
cess. We think we can "lay down
the rules of the game," Prof.
Brauer said.
Man Must Understand Himself
The major sin of' man, he as-

sinner, and then he must accept
himself as he is. This is not to
overlook the joy and goodness of
life," he explained, "but to put it
in its proper place."
Religion must be convincing to
people, the professor warned, and
whatever religion the person grasps
must be relevant to the time and
society of the individual.
Whatever answer to the prob-
lem of finding security in life is
proposed, Prof. Brauer said, must
come to the people where they
are giving them a "vision of life
that takes into account both the
joy and the suffering."
Can't Find Security in Intellect
In none of these places-mor-
ality, intellect, materialism - can
one find security, he warned. "The

By MARILYN WOOD
Interest in human learning stim-
ulated an experiment which used
specific behaviors of rats to formu-
late theories about human beings.
This experiment, conducted by
Prof. E. Rae Harcum of the Engin-
eering College, is featured in the
Dec. 5 issue of Life Magazine.
He was concerned with how ani-
mals learn and what principles
may apply to both animals and hu-
mans.
"If-we find out something about
how rats learn- then we can gen=
eralize to some extent about how
humans learn," Dr. Harcum said.
Both Animals and Mammals
"Rats and humans both are ani-
mals and mammals. Much of
what applies to rats will apply to
humans," he generalized. "The
human mind is much more Intel-
ligant, however," he continued.
Three groups of rats were used
in the experiment. Two of the
groups were raised in special re-
stricted cages for tone year, which
is one-third of the life span of a
rat.
One cage allowed the rats to
move only horizontally and the
other allowed only vertical move-
ment.
A third group of rats was used
as a control group. They had
been raised under normal labora-
tory conditions.
These rats, which were bred and
raised especially for this experi-
ment, were placed in a maze for
observation by Prof. Harcum.
Elaborate Maze
The maze was an elaborate com-
bination of wire mesh alleys
masked with white cheesecloth and
hung by wires from the ceiling of
a white room void of features and
shadows.
Prof.Harcum dressed in white
robes to blend with the back-
ground when in the experiment
room.
He wanted to see if original hab-
its of the rats would persist when

they were turned loose in the
maze.
The psychologist put food at a
certain place in the maze and then
recorded the number of errors
made by the rats each time they
tried to get to it.
Original Habits
He found that the rats which
were raised in special cages tended
to move according to their ori-
ginal habits even when they were
allowed freedom of movement.
For instance, the rats trained to
move horizontally had difficulty,
even after 40 days of testing, in
finding food when they had to go
up and down to get it, Prof. Har-
cum discovered.
He interprets that "animals,
when put in an unfamiliar environ-
ment, tend to explore."
Experimentation showed that
the restricted rats did less ex-
ploring and seemed to be more
stereotyped in behavior. Prof.
Harcum inferred that they had a
greater fear because in restriction
they had been unable to become
familiar with similar elements.
More Emotional
"They were more emotional in
new situations," Dr. Harcum hypo-
thesized.
His general conclusion is "when
an animal faces an unfamiliar
situation evidence seems to indi-
cate that there is an emotional
disturbance involved or else it
shows a lack of intellectual de-
velopment."
Either or both of these conclu-
sions might be true, Prof. Harcum
says.
Applies to Humans
"This same conclusion can be
applied to human beings, but only
to the same degree that a rat is
similar to a human," he remarked.
Prof. Harcum began this re-
search in 1953 as his doctoral
thesis. The exeperimental appar-
atus, which was located in Mason
Hall, is now dismantled.

Ads don't prove how good
our food is! But if you'll just
reserve a luncheon hour to
try the Golden Apples Room
you'll say our recommenda-
tions were on the conservative

r

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DIAL NO 2-2513

THE
36th
ANNUAL
MICHIGAN
UNION
OPERA

ON
STAGE

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46. 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Silver drop earring Sat. night
between Hill Aud. and west Quad.
Great sentimental value. Reward.
Call NO 2-4401 (Room 101). )A
LOST-Silver tie pin between E. Eng.
and Hill Aud. Sunday afternoon. No-
tify Wm. Hutton-Toledo Museum of
Art, Toledo 2, Ohio. )96A
LEATHER JACKET in Union Sunday
evening. Call NO 3-0521 Ext. 395. )98A
LOST-Girl's gold Bulova watch. Fri-
day night between Alice Lloyd and
State theater. Please call Ruth. No
3-1561. Room 2549 Alice Lloyd. )97A
LOST-Neighborhood Psi U House, Nov.
16th. Dark blue, English type bicycle,
.ouble rear baskets, tool bag, new
front tire . Reward. Call NO 3-0521,
Ext. 810-Jack. )95A
LOST - %-length light gray overcoat,
Herring bone weave, knap. Phone NO
8-7585. )94A
LOST-Aristo slide rule with cloth case
bearing my name on eve of Nov. 15.
Between East Engineering and Mich-
igan Union. Finder may please con-
tact Chari, 518 South Division. )A
FOR SALE
OVERCOAT about $30 and boiled shirts
about $5. NO 3-5441. )90B
7% FOOT SKIS with steel edges and
cable bindings. For sale or trade for
6 foot pair. NO 8-6571, )89B
SIAMESE KITTENS for sale, Siamese
cat stud service. NO 2-9020. )87B
FIRE PLACE LOGS. Seasoned Hard-
woods. $12 per cord delivered, N, J.
Coury, Saline, Mich. Call 581R.
MEISSNER FMAM Hi-F tuner and am-
plifier; Webster Chicago 3-speed
changer, G.E. V. R. Cartage; G.E.
Speaker $175. Phone NO 3-2249. )B-54
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88; sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )4B
STUDENT ROOM
RUG SPECIAL
9x12 cottons, all colors, priced
on sale now at $29.95
SMITH'S CARPET STORE
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
)5E
COOKED and cleaned select cocktail
shrimp for the party, get-togethers at.
Washington Fish Market. 208 E. Wash-
ington, NO 2-2589. Free delivery. )3B
USED CARS
1950 PLYMOUTH. 4 door, radio, heater.
New tires. In good condition, $195.
Jim white Chevrolet, 222 w. Wash-
ington, NO 2-4588. )91N
1948 CHEVROLET. 2 door. Black, radio
and heater. Perfect transportation.
$145. Jim White Chevrolet, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588 ,
1951 FORD club coupe. Radio, heater,
Fordomatic. $495. Jim White Chevro-
let, 222 W. Washington. )89N
'49 MERCURY 4 dr. R&H. overdrive.
NO 3-3889. )88N
'41 BUICK Club Coupe, radio, heater,
very good. $125. University Oldsmo-
bile, 907 N. Main. NO 3-0507. )87N
'50 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, heater,
turn signals. Very nice shape. $445.
University Oldsmobile, 907 N. Main,
NO 3-0507. )85N

Our
Christmas
Tree
Is available to you for
making your Personal-
ized Photographic
Christmas cards.
You may use your own
camera, or ours, and
we will furnish the
lighting a n d helpful
suggestions.

USED CARS
1950 FORD V-8 2-door in excellent
shape. $395. University Oldsmobile. 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507 or 2-9626. )72N
1952 CHEVROLET 2-Door-27,000 Miles.
Radio, heater, white-walls. Call NO
2-6429 after S. )60N
1949 FORD Tudor, six-cylinder, good
condition, 90 W. Joy Rd. Call NO
2-2664. )25N
'49 OLDS, super 88, cream convertible.
Red leather seats, bydramatic, ra-
dio, heater, new top, white walls.
$350. Call after 6:30, NO 3-1279. )19N
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Manuscripts, Thesis, Disser-
tations, etc. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Phone NO 2-5336. )18J
TYPING - Thesis, Term papers, ece.
Reasonable rates, prompt service. 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )154
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 N tkels Arcade.
)4J

PERSONAL
TYPING, Fast accurate work done on
electric typewriter. Past experience-
with printers firm. Experienced in
dissertations, term papers, etc. Call
NO 2-7605. )F57
FOR RENT
OPPORTUNITY to ii e near campus
with young family for girl who will
help evenings. Private room. Phone
NO 2-7040. )19H
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED-Garage l near Lawyer's Club
to rent until June. Call Mr. Sosich,
NO -3-4145. Leave message. )8L
WANTED TO RENT - Four bedroom
house for at least one year from July.
Phone NO 2-8576. )7
MATURE WOMAN, Grad student about
to begin teaching urgently needs small
apt. with cooking facilities. Please
call NO 2-1154 between 5 p.m.-8 p.m.
or write 309 N. Ingalls. )6L
SENIOR GIRL desires to share modern
furnished apartment in S.E. section
second semester. NO 8-7860. )24C
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Cook's help - 14
hours week, free meals, snacks. NO 3-
8506. Phone 12 to 2 P.M. )54H
MALE STUDENT, who can drive, to,
work as salesman's carrier in Detroit
on Monday, December 12th. Phone NO
2-3061. )H51
WAN ED-Male student to work alter-
nate nights doing maintenance work.
25-30 years old. Call NO 2-5151 after
9:30 P.M. )49H
WANTED - Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call NO 2-3241.
)29H
WANTED-cab drivers. Full or part
time. Apply 113 8. Ashley, Ann Arbor.
Yellow and Checker Cab Company,
phone NO 8-9382. )6H
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
7 BOWLING ALLEYS - with lockers,
balls, pins, seats, etc. All in excel-
lent condition. Make offer. Must be
moved because of lease. Ross Real Es-
state, NO 2-7736. )58
RESTAURANT near Ann Arbor. Excel-
lent location and business.
HOTEL centrally located -- very good
business.

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{

"FILM
FLAW'
CURTAIN
at
8:30

5t

"Y@&W HTEL
~7WAILse o PN/G m'wfOeam

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RANDOLPH
SCOTT
in
"A Lawless Street"

PROF. JERALD C. BRAUER
... "This I Believe" speaker
Christian religion alone says man
can find his security in a faithful,
understanding God."
We are going to be sick, we are
going to die, he commented, but
the "Christian faith asserts that
no natter what happens we can
never be separated from the love
of- God."
"This means a form of hope and
certainty," he concluded. "This is
the new reality in which one must
find himself."

Organization Notices

0

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American Society of Civil Engineers,
Student Chapter: Film and speaker on
"Welding in Railroad Maintenance,"
also "Why Attend Camp David?" Dec.
7, 7:30 p.m., 311 West Engineering.
* *
Le Cercle Francais: Poetry contest

and Christmas party, today, 8:00 p.m.,
Rumpus Room, League.
11 Circolo Italiano, (Chiacherata): To-
day, 3:15 p.m., Club 600, South Quad.
s * *

I,

~t~tpz ffi
(Autthor of -Barefoot Boyj With Cheek," etc.)

f GOING HOME?
SAVE MONEY
RIDE THE VULCAN TRAINS
¬Ęc:.... ... :_. ...........".... . ... ar. .......::, .._...:.:...:i" 2:2:>..v. :...s . ......... ._: .... 2:-:..

Engineering Honor Council:'
may be picked up in Dean
Office, 249 W. Engr., and are
4; Interviews Jan. 6.
s 0

Petitions
Emmons
due Jan.

THE GIFT HORSE

Today's column is about Christmas gift suggestions, and I
suppose you think I'll begin by suggesting Philip Morris. Well,
the joke's on you. I'll do no such thing. Why should I? Anyone
with two brains to knock together knows that Philip Morris
makes an absolutely smashing Christmas gift. Only a poor
afflicted soul with atrophied taste buds needs to be told about the
new Philip Morris; its bracing flavor; its freshness, lightness,
pleasantness, gentleness; its truth, its beauty, its brotherliness
in this discordant world of ours. So why should I waste time
telling you what you already know?

Save up to 18% on tickets to
Chicago, New York and other
points East.

Episcopal Student Foundation: Eve-
ning prayer, meditation on "Adcnai,"
5:15 p.m., cabinet meeting, 7:00 p.m.,
Advanced Study Seminar, "Criticism
and the Bible," Dec. 7. Canterbury
House, 218 N. Division.
" i 0 '
Hillel Foundation: Administrative
Council meeting, Dec. 8, 7:15 p.m.
Assembly meeting, Dec. 7, 7:00 p.m.
Beginning and intermediate classes in
Hebraw instruction, Dec. 7, 8:00 p.m.
Cultural Committee meeting, today,
7:00 p.m.
Religious, Committee meeting, Dec.
7, 4:15 p.m.
Social Committee meeting, today,
7:30 p.m.
History Dept., Student Faculty Coffee
Hour: December 7, 4:30-5:30 p.m., 2nd
floor Terrace Room, Michigan Union.
* * *
Student Government Council Campus
Affairs Committee: Today, 8:30 p.m.,
Room 3-R, Michigan -Union. Ensian
picture will be taken.
* *

Purchase from
"Purchase"
CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University
Phone NO 8-6972
Open every Monday and
Friday evenings 'til
Christmas.
WASHINGS-Also ironings privately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020. )9J
RICHARD MADDY-VIOLINMAKER
Fine, old certified instruments &
bows. 310 8. State. NO 2-5962. )2J
SERVICE SHOP, 1217 S.A. Studio. 1317
S. Univ. )1J
HI-Fl Components and Service Audio-
phile, net prices. Telefunken Hi-Fl,
AM-FM shortwave radios. Service on
all makes of radios and phonographs.
Ann Arbor Radio and TV, 1217 S.
University. Phone NO 8-7942. 1%,a
blocks east of East Eng.14
PERSONAL
LANDA, Please come back. All is for-
given. Peter Gould, NO 2-0360. )61F
Hear, hear, hear-
A happy birthday June and Jo,
Beer, Beer, Beer-
The twins are 2 you know! )60F
SAY HAPPY BIRTHDAY the different
way. Send friendly greetings to
friends by advertising in the MICH-
IGAN DAILY CLASSIFIED Section.

ROSS REAL ESTATE

For RESULTS

NO 2-7736
)3R

TRANSPORTATION
PASSENGERS to California Dec. 15th.
Gertrude Kanips. Phone NO 2-0047.
)18G

i
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";r, rcv'r q"7i'k'dt :" ":"4^ """' :{r,.:"..:Rvrr: :: y,^ ":"5:": .j:' v,.; . $! : '.x "i, ..;r.; v-.".;; ":"'r~e^ts... . r,'.,wn"S":. a
} . F.:":":s :"::titi;ti:" 4: : :. a "3: v r!. ":\x ::ki. SC" ":v,.:"::s' J ti

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dtL7I4,.k

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...._...
.. .
' - -a.

Tickets on sale in Administration Building
this week.

Read and

Use

Daily Classifieds

I

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DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
Presents
1955 HOPWOOD DRAMA-AWARD
Of the English Department

El

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Let us, instead, turn to less obvious gift suggestions. Here's
one I bet you never thought of:
Christmas is the best time of year, but it is also the beginning
of winter. How about a gift that reminds one that though winter
has come, spring is not far behind? I refer, of course, to Easter
chicks. (Similarly, on Easter one can give Christmas chicks.)
Next, we take up the problem, common to all undergraduates,
of trying to buy gifts when you have no money. To this dilemma
I say-Faugh! It is not the price of the gift that counts; it is the
sentiment behind it.
Take, for example, the case of Outerbridge Sigafoos. Outer-
bridge, a sophomore, finding himself without funds last Christ-
mas, gave his girl a bottle of good clear water and a nice smooth
rock, attaching this touching message to the gift:
Here's some water
And here's a rock,
I love you, daughter,
Around the'clock.
And the whole delightful gift cost Outerbridge less than a
penny!
I am compelled to report, however, that Outerbridge's girl did
not receive these offerings in the spirit in which they were
tendered. In fact, she flew into a fit of pique, smashed the bottle
on the rock and stabbed Outerbridge with the jagged edge. But
the experience was not without value for Outerbridge. First, he
discovered that the girl was not his type at all. Second, he learned
how to make a tourniquet.
But I digress. Let's examine now a common complaint of
Christmas shoppers: "What do you get for someone who has
everything?"
To this I reply, "Does he?" Does he, for instance, have a
unicycle? A sled dog? A serf ? A burnoose? A hairball? A bung
starter? (The bung starter, incidentally, was invented by two
enormously talented men, Fred Bung and Otho Starter. Their
partnership thrived from the very start, and there is no telling
to what heights they might have risen had they not split up
over a silly argument. It seems that Bung was a firm believer in
renernton Sater wV Xa tas fim nAicqhcli~voi. Runes in-

f '

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By Russell A. Brown, '56
f'Jt's not only timely but honest and diamatically effective."
-ELMER RICE
Thurs., Fri. & Sat. - Dec. 8, 9 and 10 - 8 P.M.
$1.20 - 90c - 60c

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STUDENTS 50c THURSDAY - All Seats Reserved

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Box Office Open 10 A.M. - 5 P.M.

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-~ d%.. ~'L39~. 'N ~ I I U U

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