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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1955 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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WEDNESDAY. SEPTEIVMML 21. lolut

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEflJV~TIAV~ ~PT1~1i~mu~"R 91 1OM~ - - I - a.eAaa..ara.Jaw a, *U~O

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INTER-COOPERATIVE COUNCIL:
Living inCo-op Houses
Helps Save on Expenses

Summer and Winter on University Campus

Living in a co-op is one effective
way to cope with the rising cost of
living.
Considerable savings in housing
expenses are possible because all
the work in co-ops is done by
members. Students spend five or
six hours a week performing such
tasks as cooking, dish washing,
repairs and office work.
Room and board is approximate-
ly $200 per semester. Each room is
completely furnished and accomo-
Engineers' Council
An Engineer Council, for the
purpose of correlating and repre-
senting all organizations and stu-
dents of the engineering college,
was recently formed at the Uni-
versity.

dates from one to four people.
Three meals are served daily and
members have the privilege of ice-
box raiding.
The Inter-Cooperative Council
governs the seven member houses.
It operates a centralized food pur-
chasing fund and coordinates the
affairs of each house.
Every co-op elects one ICC dele-
gate for every ten members. The
delegates meet twice a month and
make decisions regarding expan-
sion andmembership.
Co-ops under ICC direction in-
clude Michigan, Nakamura and
Owen houses for men, Lester and
Stevens for women, Osterweil
house for graduate women and
Brandeis house for married stu-
dents.

---1-

The First ,
UNION DANCE
of 1955-56
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24

I

SNOW-COVERED CAMPUS-An aesthetic combination of snow and light at night is captured by
the camera looking down on S. State St. in the wintertime. On the right is Angell Hall, the center of
Literary College classes and activities. Rising above it is Burton Memorial Tower, which houses the
music school's offices and classrooms along with the carillon, oftentheard in recital by Prof. Perci-
val Price. On the left is the Administration Building, the nerve center of Michigan's great University.

9-12 P.M.

Union Ballroom

RED JOHNSON
and his orchestra

LEAGUE FOUNTAIN-Surrounded by benches for a quiet rendezvous, the famed fountain on The
Mall in front of the Women's League is turned on during the spring semester and sprays cool<
beauty all summer long. Sometimes graced by suds of orange or green as the result of a student
prankster, Titan's waters are usually cool and fresh, and provide an atmosphere conducive to peace
of mind in Ann Arbor's hot summers. In the spring, the fountain is the site for initiation ceremon-
ies by Sphinx, junior men's honorary.

In addition to its many other
services to students, the Union
sponsors several trips a year into
Detroit to see popular stage
shows.

Hillel Foundation Provides
Center for Jewish Students

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The B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion at the University provides a
meeting place for Jewish students
away from home and various ac-
tivities along cultural, religious
and social lines.
Among these activities are week-
ly Sabbath services, kosher meals,
several lecture series and numer-
ous dances.
Besides providing these activi-
ties, Hillel also conducts services
for all religious holidays falling
during the school year. Along this
line, Hillel will conduct Yom Kip-
pur services in September.
Prior to the Yom Kippur serv-
ices, Hillel has planned several
functions during orientation week.
There will be a Coke Hour for
all freshmen from 3 to 5 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 21. Hillel's semi-
annual Open House Mixer featur-
ing a campus band will be held
from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 22.
Full Schedule
Of Events Set.
For Orientation
(Continued from Page 1)
League Night program will give
new- women students an idea of"
the type of activities carried on by
the League.'
Block 'M'"
Also at 8 p.m. Thursday, Block
"M" will hold an organizational
meeting in Hill Auditorium for
students interested in joining the
flashcard section which performs
at football games.
Friday night has been set aside
for newcomers to visit the church'
of their choice. Welcoming pro-
grams have been prepared by
church organizations.
The Student Religious Associa-
tion will hold an Open House at
8 p.m. Saturday at Lane Hall.
In addition to these events, there
will be many rotating activities on
the orientation program. These
include academic counseling, X-
ray and audiometer exams and
posing for identification pictures.
Students who plan to attend
band tryout sessions will be as-
signed to special orientation
groups and their schedules are
designed to allot them -time to
practice and to take full part in
band auditioning.

Convocation*
Held in Sprinl,

Y

A kosher Sabbath dinner, with
reservations required, followed by
services and an.Oneg Shabbatt will I
be held at 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23.
Sabbath moring services will be
held the next morning.
An Open House will follow th
Michigan-Missouri football game
A freshman Brunch is schedule
for 10:30 a.m. Sunday, reservations
required.
The Kol Nidrei service will start
at 7 p.m. Sunday. The Monday
morning service will begin at ap-
proximately 10 a.m.
Annal Hoos

I

ittt anx

During the school year honors
come to many people, both stu-
dents and faculty, at the Univer-
sity.
The Honors Convocation, held
every spring, calls attention to
those who have distinguished
themselves during the preceding
year.
Convocation procedure today is
much the same as it was in May,
1924, when University President
Marion L. Burton began the cere-
mony.
Clad in black robes with brigh
academic ribbons, the Regents file
onto the stage first, followed by
faculty .members. After solemn
music and the national anthem,
honor students are presented.
Next on the program is the con-
vocation address, always given by
a nationally prominent personal-
ity. After organ music and the
singing of "Yellow and Blue," the
audience files out.
Map of Campus
Senior Class, Gift
The map of the campus on the
corner of North University and S.
State St. was the gift of the 1955
graduating class to the Universit'
Erected last semester, the
is enclosed in a glass and stainless
steel cabinet.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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If Mailed ... $1.00 extra

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