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May 17, 1956 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-17

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TIR C SDA"Y, MAY 17,1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGEV TI ,

THURSDAY, MAY 17, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

i ire irn+rr r.nrnrrrrrr i.rru

Net

Squad

Overpowers

Western s

Broncos,

9-0

Potter, Harris Stage Rallies
To Complete Team Shutout
-4

MI .. STEVE BOROS

By DIANE LaBAKAS
Once the most feared tennis
team in the midwest, Western
Michigan had its guns stilled yes-
terday by Michigan's Big Ten
championship squad, 9-0.
The win not only ran the Wol-
verine victory streak to 30 but
also brought their home schedule
to a close. The Wolverines will
close the season Saturday against
Northwestern and then prepare for
the Big Ten championships in
Minneapolis, May 24-26.
The Bronco's Chuck Donnelly
provided little competition against
Michigan's first singles star Barry
MacKay, as he bowed 6-3, 6-1. All
MacKay had to do was to jump on
the 5'7" Donnelly's poor serve and
pepper his weak backhand to gain
points.
Michigan's Dick Potter provided
-the best match of the day as he
came from behind to edge Denny
Telder, 0-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Statistics
Singles
MacKay (M) def. Donnelly (WM),
Potter (M) def. Telder (WM), 0-6,
6-4, 6-4.
Jaffe (M) def. Yoder (WM), 6-0, 6-1.
Harris (M) def. Crawford (WM), 4-6,
6-3, 6-4.
Jensen (M) def. Christian (WM),
6-1, 6-1.
Brown (M) def. Allen (WM), 6-4, 6-4.
Doubles
MacKay-Potter (M) def. Donnelly-
Telder (WM), 6-3, 7-5.
Jaffe.Harris (M) def. Yoder-Craw-
ford (WM), 6-2, 6-1.
Brown-Jensen (M) def. Christian-
Alien (WM), 7-5. 6-1.

Potter, who has looked unim-
pressive since playing the second
singles slot, came through with the
tennis he is capable of in the
third set after trailing 2-0.
During the first set, Potter play-
ed poorly at net and the back-
court against the amazingly con-
sistent Telder. However, his net
play became sharper and his drop
shots excellent as the match pro-
gressed.
Play Final Set Cautiously
The final set was just the op-
posite from the first two as both
players played more cautiously.
However, Telder, who rarely came
to the net, couldn't offset the ac-
curate smashes of Potter. This
eventually lost him the match.
Mark Jaffe's forehand and net
play proved too powerful for his
opponent, Larry Yoder, who bowed
6-0, 6-1. Jaffe still appeared to
have difficulty with his backhand
which has handicapped him all
season.
John Harris played a close
match with Dick Crawford before
rallying to win, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. Dale
Jensen had a much easier time in
defeating Dan Christian, 6-1,
6-1, while Larry Brown completed
singles play, downing Max Allen,
6-4, 6-4.
MacKay and Potter teamed to
defeat Donnelly, who was state
doubles champion in 1954, and
Telder, 6-3, 7-5. Jaffe and Harris
defeated Yoder and Crawford, 6-2,
6-1, while Brown and Jensen out-
lasted Christian and Allen, 7-5,
6-1.

SECOND SINGLES-Dick Potter, who had difficulty with his
opponent, Danny Telder yesterday, played excellently in the third
set to win, 0-6, 6-4, 6-4.
-Pitchers Hghlight Play
In I-MSoftball Games

By LYNNE TOWLE
"Who, me?"
This was the response of Steve
Boros, Michigan's leading baseball
hitter, when he was asked to be
interviewed. His modest behavior
seemed to be reflected in these
two words.
Looking at the cold statistics,
Boros has the team's top batting
average for the regulars with 25
hits in 70 times at bat for a solid
.357 batting average. His nearest
contender is 24 points behind him.
Scouts Interested
The sound of his booming bat
has caused scouts from all of the
major league clubs to turn their
heads in his direction.
Fellow teammates agree that
he is further along than most
young ballplayers in experience
and training. However, as good a
ballplayer as he is, he is always
willing to learn. He is forever
asking Coach Ray Fisher or one of
the seniors on the team for any
criticism of his performance.
Because Boros broke into the
regular lineup in his sophomore
year, catcher Gene Snider tagged
him with the nickname, "Rookie."
Now that he is a mainstay on the
squad, he jokingly retains the
name "Rookie."
High Academically
In addition to being an excellent
athlete, Boros rates high academi-
cally with a 3.1 average. He justi-
fiably complains against the feel-
ing that many people have about
athletes being stupid.
Until this year he had regularly
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near Michigan Theatre

"My main problem in changing
from shortstop to third base is
that I hurry too much although I
don't really need to," mused Boros.
"Most of the fielding errors I
make are caused by this unneces-
sary rushing," he added. "By con-
stantly working at it, I hope my
fielding will improve as I get used
to the position."
Fishtr Helps
Boros feels that Fisher helped
him a great deal by working with
him when he first started to play.
"He notices the little things that
help make a ball player," he com-
mented. "I was trying to make
too much of an impression when
I joined the team," he added.
"The greatest moment of my
life came just before we left for
our Southern trip when I put on
my uniform for the first time," he
expressed.

STEVE BOROS
... sophomore starter

No-hit Relief
By Morgan
Beats Tribe
CLEVELAND (JP)--Tom Morgan
pitched the New York Yankees
back into the American League
lead yesterday with a 4-1 victory
over the Cleveland Indians on a
great no-hit relief stint of 5 2/3
innings.
The righthander relieved start-
er Maury McDermott in the fourth
Anyone interested in playing
soccer this spring is invited to
attend practice at 4:30 p.m.
today or call Norm Thomas at
NO 3-2903.
-The Michigan Soccer Club
inning when the Indians loaded
the bases with one out. Then he
retired the side.
Not an Indian got on base the
remainder of the game. In all, he
set down 17 Indians in order. It
was a perfect relief job.

played shortstop. The blond
sophomore switched to third base
when Don Eaddy's graduation va-
cated the hot corner.

Major League Scores

SWIMMER, SCHOLAR:
Kruthers Wins Awards

By MIKE FLYER
Pitchers John Law of Delta
Sigma Pi and Jim Watkins of
Nu Sigma Nu turned in fine pitch-
ing performances to lead their
teams to victory in I-M profes-
sional fraternity softball yester-
day.
Nu Sigma Nu pitcher Jim Wat-
kins had a 7-0 shutout going until
the last inning, and then ran into
trouble. With. two men on bases,
Bob Binn of Alpha Chi Sigma
lined a home run down the left
field line. Watkins then settled
down to get the side out, and Nu
Sigma Nu won 7-3.
No-Hit Shutout
John Law of Delta Sigma Pi
hurled a no-hit shutout and de-
feated Phi Delta Chi 8-0. Law
struck out five, but had control
trouble as he walked four. Tom
Glaza hit a three run home run
in the first inning to give Delta
Sigma Pi enough runs to win.
Sigma Chi scored in every in-
ning and ran up a total of 27 runs
to crush Phi Gamma Delta 27-8.
1

Sigma Chi pitcher Gordon Morrow
held the Phi Gams to three runs
for six innings.
Theta Xi edged out Phi Kappa
Psi 9-8 on a home run by Paul
Carlson. Tom Chamberlain was
the winning pitcher.
Independent Action
In Independent action, the Psy-
chology B team won a close game
over the Chemistry A team 7-6.
The chemists scored* five runs in
the first inning, and the psycholo-
gists battled back until the last
inning when they scored two runs
to win the game.
In other games Bacteriology
trounced the Chemistry B team
2 1-4, the Psychology A team beat
the Astronomy team by a similar
margin, 23-6, Cooley House edged
out the Physicai Education De-
partment 8-7, Evans Scholars de-
feated Other House 12-4, and the
Seldom Seen Kids turned back
Farouk's Nine 3-1.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Yesterday's Games
Chicago3, Washington 1
New York 4, Cleveland 1
Boston 4, Detroit 2
Baltimore 8, Kansas City 6
Today's Games
New York at Chicago
Boston at Kansas City (N)
Baltimore at Detroit (N)
Only Games Scheduled

IF

11

OFFICER'S SHOES

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Yesterday's Games
Brooklyn 3, St. Louis 3
New York 9, Chicago 3
Pittsburgh 9, Cincinnati ?
Philadelphia 2, Milwaukee 1
Today's Games
Milwaukee at New York (N)
St. Louis at Philadelphia (N)
Chicago at Pittsburgh (N)
Only Games Scheduled
LOWEST PRICES

U.S. Army-Navy Type

By FRITZ MYERS
The arrival of an exceptional
athlete who has an exceptional
amount of intelligence has always
been impetus for much specula-
tion.
To carve out a 3.6 overall aver-
age in Michigan's Engineering
,L School and cop two third places
and a fourth in the Western Con-
ference Swimming Championships
is a feat that few athletes can
boast.
Jim Kruthers is a senior in
Engineering School and a three-
year varsity man in swimming.
Because of his success in both,
he has, during the past year, been
the proud recepient of a number
of awards based on his abilities as
a swimmer, student and leader.
Last fall, Kruthers received the
Board in Control of Intercollegiate
Athletics scholarship. This award
is given annually to the Michigan
varsity athlete who had the high-
est point average at the comple-
tion of his junior year.'
Some months later, he was
chosen, along with 18 other ath-
letes, to receive the Fielding H.
Yost honor award. Again, this is
an annual award given to out-
standing juniors and seniors.
In order to be considered those
honored had to show excellence in
the fields of athletics, scholarship,
leadership, and sportsmanship.
And, just recently, Kruthers was

the receiver of the yearly Inter-
collegiate A t h 1 e t i c Conference
medal. This award is presented by
the Western Conference Athletic
Board to one outstanding athlete
from each of the Big Ten schools.
It is probably the most honored
award, scholastically, that an ath-
lete can garner.

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