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May 17, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-17

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pArST

"t't W)CIOlGAIN" 1,1

PA~r s~ TRE. ftflCIlIfiAN DAILY

.._..

4

Flameneanu
Interpretor
To Perfo i'n
By RENE GNAM
Carlos Cortes, a foremost ter-
pretor of Flamencan Dance in'
America, will be featured on a
half hour WUOM television show,
at 7:30 p.m., tomorrow.
Cortes, who did a guest appear-I
ance on WUOM last slimmer, has
scheduled o r i g i n a 1 Flamencan!
Dance choreography for tomor-
row's program.
This show will combine the
Flamenco with Spanish sympho-.
nic music, a type dancing seldom
performed in Spain, and so farl
as can be determined, never in
America.
Cortes has a.dapted his own in-
terpretations of Flamencan Dance
to symphonic music, as performed

U,,,S.i ! e

Schools

DAILY OFFICALBULE

11

-Daily-Bill van Oosterhout
CARLS CORTES
S. Flamenco dancer
by the Madrid Symphony Orches-
tra.
Interviewed yesterday, Cortes
said "It is always a pleasure to
perform before a University audi-
ence."
He expressed the desire to es-
tablish greater contact between
students and Flamencan Dance,
"The Flamenco," he said, "is a
serious dance. Spanish gypsies
teach the dance to their children
who in turn teach it to their chil-
dren. In this way the dance is
perpetuated."
At the present time, Cortes not-
ed, there are only two ac-
complished interpretors of Fla-
mencan Dance in America. He
cited Jose Greco as the foremost
Flamenco interpretor in the Unit-
ed States.
Cortes, who allo gives private
instructlon in Flamencan Dance,
mentioned that University stu-
dents have the ability to appreci-
ate dance forms of other coun-
tries.
Playvreaders
Set To Appear
The Ann Arbor Playreading
Group will read "Waiting For Lef-
ty" at 8 p.m. Friday in the Ma-
sonic Temple.
Written by Clifford Oetd , t e
reading will be directed by Phil-
ip Diskin.
The Ann Arbor Playreading
Group is sponsored by the Dra-
matic Arts Center, and anyone is
welcome free of charge,
The Group is interested in
people who want to read or direct.

'Get Support
'Of Faculty
By KEITH eVRIES
The University faculty is not
too impressed with the claim In
the current Look magazine that
the English educationay system
is superior to the American.
The magazine's conclusion is
based on a Gallup survey in
which students in both countries
were asked 50 questions about art,
culture, and science. The English
students consistently got higher
scores on the tests.,
Prof. Roger W. Heyn of the
psychology departnent calls the
poll's findings "insufficient evi-
dence"
"The question of which system
is the better one is too complex to
be determined by such a shallow
survey," he says
Prof. Claude Eggertsen of the
School of Education admits that
the average English student may
be superior to the average Ameri-
can, but "there are so many more
Americans in college," he adds.
"In England there are 100,000
college students, but here in Am-
erica there are 3 million while
we have a population of only about
three times that of England.
English More Selective
"Besides," he says, "the Eng-
lish schools are much more selec-
tive. The students who will go
on to college are picked when they
are only 11-years-old."
Prof. Erich A. Walter, assistant
to President Harlan H. Hattcher,
also observes that English schools
concentrate on the superior stu-
dent. He declares that one way
in which the English system is
better is that a broad, liberal edu-
cation is open to students in all
courses
Sink Relates
Experiences
With Music
Music is a vital, potent force in
a nation's culture-it eases wor-
ries and tensions, builds up one's
courage to face his problems,
and leaves the appreciative listen-
er feeling a little better for the ex-
perience,
This, in essence, is what music
means to Dr. Charles A. Sink
president of the University Musi-
cal Society. "This," he said, "is
what makes music worthwhile to
me; this is why I have devoted my
life to briiging the very finest
music, played by the very greatest
artists, to the University and the
community."
Speaking before an. appreciative
audience yesterday in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall, Sink briefly
explained the value of good music
in the culture. He devoted most of
his time, however, to relating anec-
dotes about great musicians whom
he has been personally acquainted,
including Ernestine Schumann-
Heink, the Czechoslovakian con-
tralto, Sergei Rachmaninoff, fam-
ous Russian composer and pianist,
Marian Anderson, great American
opera star, and Jascha Heifetz and
Yehudi Menuhin, celebrated vio-
linists

~Conrinued from .?ag 4
man ,J . } seemn
ooral Exarninemon mr Ecirrd iMe
Shatter, Jr, Speech: thesis "'A Study
of Rhetoria In4ento n Sleced
Enls Iteoric 15n"0-l0 hr.
May 7, astCouncil Room Rackhsm
iinat p. Cairman
Sattler,.
Foctoral Exannion :or 1 a1es A
Kokoris, Economics; thesi: '"The Eco..
nomic and Financial Development of
Okayama Prefecture Japan" Fri Ma
18, 105 Economics Building, at 417 0
p.ms Chairm.n, C F. Remer, a
Doctoral kxamnation for Robert noyd
Step'Wheo, Anhropology-, heis: "Ac-
Culture eqfence, r, Ma 18, Room
4017, Museums Buiding, at 2:00 p.mng
ChaIrmnan ,J. B Griffin,
Doctoral Examinaiton for Geor Emil
tisy, Education; thesc "A Corn
parativa Stua of the Counseling Meth-
ods Employed by he Graduates of
Andover Newton Theological School and
Eastern Baptist. Theological Seminary,"
Fri. Mayv 18 4019 Untversity High
School, at 4:00 p.m. Chairman H. C.
Koch.
Ponca Tribe," Fri May 18, 4017 Mu-
seums Bldg. a 4.00 p in Chairman,
V. HJones.
Doctoral Examination for Mariani Em.
ily white, Anthropolog; thesis: "Iro-
quois Culture History in the Niagara
Frontier Area of New York State," Fri.,
May 18, Room 4017, Museum Building,
at 11:00 a.m Chairman, J. . Grifn,
Doctoral Examination for Dolores
Darlene Saunders Dundee, Zoology;
thesis: "Aspects of the Biology of
Pornatiopsis lapidaria (Say) (Mollusco:
Gastropoda: Prosobranchiai" Fri. Mayc
18, 2089 Natural science Biliding, at.
9:00 a.m chairman, H.. van dier Schalie,
The Fo'ing School. wi 1 have rep-
resentate at the Bureau of Ap
polntments to interview eand cates for
teaching positions starting in Septem-
ber, 1956.
Thursday.. May i:
Highland Park, Mih 1e,.rnes

I metay (Kdg, Mo 6th); Liborary;
yhs ci. Girls' Art; Homemaking;
Junior High Homeroorm High School
Math; English; Phys. Ed. Girls; Driver
Training; Librar; Physics; Chemistry;
Biology; Visiting Teacher.,'
River Rouge, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary (Kdig, 2nd, 2nd/3rd. 5th.,
5th); Art; Vocal Music/English or His
tory, Special Ed. (Typs C); Matn/,
ScIence/EnglIsh/'Social Studies; Girls'
Phy. Ed'.
Rockwood, Mich, - Teacher -needs:
Elementary; Eler. Vocal Music; Reme-
dia Reading
Fr. My 18:
Rosevilpe, Midis, leach eeds

arband il intervew men ndi women
for Art8 & Crafts Counselors.,
Rush Cattell, Camp Cherokee. Steu-
ben, Mich, will interview for men
Coupselors
Arne Cole Ann rbo YCK il
interview for Counselors
Miss Diane Rxchardion, Southern Oak-
land Girl scouts, wil interview for
Mrs. WautersA Camp Hiltop, will in-.
terview for men and women Counselors,
Ralph Ellsworth, Ford Dealer in Gar-
den City, Mich., will interview for
Salesmren.
A representative from the Gibsona
Refrigerator Co., wil interview for
Salesmen.
W. C. Wilison of Crowel-Colier Pub-
lishing Co., Detroit, will interview men
for summer sales promotional jobs in
the Educationrl Division (Not selling
magazines,)
Fred Smart Pure Oil Co. Toledo,
Ohio, will Interview men for work in
Service Stations on the Ohio Turnpike.,
Arthur Kinsman, Continental Casual-

ty Co., Chicago, Ill,, will interview for
their Summer Program.
The Will-O.-ay Apprentice Theater,
.Bloomfield Hils, Mich., will interview
for actors and actresses,
anley Mlchael, Camp Nahelu, Or-
tonville. Mich,- will interview for men
and women Counselors
PERSONNEL REQUESTS'
Hoosier Solvets & Chemicas Corp.,
InCianapolis, Ind.. has an opening for
a Chemical Sales Representative
U.S. Civil Service announces examina-.
tions for Accounting Clerks, Technical
Editors & Writers, Baeteriologist, Agri-
cultural Economnist,
Board of U.S. Civil ervice Examiners,
Bureau of Indian Affairs, announces
openings for Reiocation Officers.
Board of U.S. Civil Service Examiners,
seifridge Air Force Base, Mich., announ-
ces openings for Firefighters ({Crash &
Structura
Washington State Personnel Board
announces opportunities for Graduate
Nurses and Public Health Nurses.

State of Michigan Civil Service a
nounces examinations for Person
.Methods Technician, Practical Nur
Engineer Trainee, Psyciatric Soci
Worker, State Police Trooper, Highw
Engineering Draftsman, Highway Su
vey & Construction Engineer, and San
torium Attendant.
Hurley Hospital, Flint. Mich., hasa
opening for an Assistant Hospital Pe
sonnel Officer.
For further information on the ao
contact the Bureau of Appointmen'
3528 Administration Bldg., Ext. 371.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS.
A representative from the followin
will be at the Bureau of Appointnent
Tues., May 22:
American Telephone & Telegraph C
Long Distance Lines, Headquartersi
Cincinnati, Ohio - Women for the ne
Executive Training Program in Midwes
For appointments contact the Bure:
of Appointments, 3528 Administrati
Bldg., Ext. 371.

iel
se,
Lal
ay
a-
ye
ts,
i.

THURSDAY, MAY 17, 1956
Fountain
Pens
Typewriters
Supplies
Typewriters and
DESKS, CHAIRS, FILES
Fountain Pens Repaired
MRRILLS
314 S. State NO 3-2481

ementary; Juior High Math; Girls'
Phys. Ed. Genera Science: Library;
High School English; hiome Ec; Indus-
trial Arts
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of Ap-.
pointment, 3528 Administration Bldg
NO 3-1511, Ext. 489
The Following Schools wil hae rep-
resentatives at the Bureau of Appoint-
.nt o interview teachers for the
1956-57 school year.
Tuesday, May 22:
Port Huron, Mich, Knimball Unit
Schools) - Teacher needs: Elementary
(Kdg., 1st); Junior High; Visiting
Teacher
Wednesday, May i3:
chappaqua, New Vonx [each r
needs: )lementary (3rd)! -th Grade
Social Studies; 8th Grade Social Studies;
8th Grade Math; Art; Nurse; High
School Guidance; Spanish; Girls' Phys.
Ed.; Math/Slow students,
For information and appointments
contact the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Bldg., NO 3-1511.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
There will be a meeting of rhe Sum-
ner Pla cement Service in Room 3G.
Michigan Union, Thurs., May 17, from
The last three meetings of the Sum-
mn Placement Service w11 be Thurs,,
May 17, Wed., May 23,.rand Tues., May
After May 29 come to the Bureau
of Appointments. 3528 Administration
SUMMiER PLACE1MENT 1N.TEIIVIEWS
1epresenatives from the folowin
will be here to tnterview for summer
Job, Room 3G, Michigan Union, 1 to
4:45 p.m.
Thursday, May 17:
artin Gold, Head

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Cool, dark and handsome.
Indian Madras in a wardrobe of co-ordinates ,,
fashioned of Coloray "Captive Color"
striped rayon weaves combined with black
rayon linen . . . Misses' sizes,
Jh s ... CRALY PANTS: 8.95
BLOUSE: 7.95
1. r/ed--LONG SHORTS: 5.95
S-ORT SHORTS: 4.95
SCOOP BLOUSE: 7.95
SKMT: 12.95
STOLE; 3.95
AM rAT LBERTY ANrN AasoR
Only the i-nest Qualiy 4A P en thai ave Par

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* Hondsew'n Moccasin-Tce Oxford
* Wetherized Soles & Uppers
* Phillips Removobic Spikes
* Fufl Steel Ploa..

r'". .
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"CADET"
leads the fashion parade'
marches your junior hgur,
into the smoothest kind of
shape! It's the hip-hiding,
curve-defining shorts
silhouette that tops off its
fashion lines with a sparkling
jewelled tab! Plaid Laster,
junior sizes 9 to. 15, 17.95
Maerroielle
TOWN & COLLEGE SHOP
302 South State

* MADE BY
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Turn a bold shoulderto Sum mer in
WARNER'S Strapless bras
A strapless by Warner's lear c you free for fun, and it as '
All th. little niceties that add up to the last word in comfort
You can be sure we hav a Warner's for 'ou-there're that
many to choose from! (No. 20- irs W rne with con
vertble bra straps that adjSt to many ashsons Fnbro
ered_ cotton, thin foam under-bust. A. B, C cups Whit
$3.50.)

GOT YOUR
orCharcoal, Navy, Faded Blue! Red
Most popular shoe on campus
^- t
THIS BLUE KEDS LABEL STAMPS
ThE SHOE OF CHAMPIONS

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,_ ____._ . _ _, w....__._._. __. _ __~

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. 1956

1956

'4

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