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April 21, 1956 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-21

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I.

' E MICHIGAN fDAILY

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QA'T'T DA, AUL 21,*41959

F

ish, Rats and Humans
learn at Open House

By EARL GOTTSCHALK j
Rats, fish and humans were sub-I
jects for learning and behavior
tests at the psychology open house
held Wednesday on the third floor
of Mason Hall.
Nearly 1,000 interested students
toured the exhibits in the human,
fish, and animal laboratories.
Laboratory psychologists de-
monstrated new techniques and
equipment in the laboratories, and
apparatus used in clinical and
group dynamics tests was on dis-
play in the halls.
An interesting device to aid the
social psychologist in a conference
was the "interaction recorder."
The "interaction recorder" is used
to compare people in a group with
regard to the amount of their par-
ticipation in a group discussion,
'Memory Drum'
The "memory drum," on display
in the hall, showed that it is bet-
ter to go through the material
to be studied slowly, then review,
instead of "cramming" the ma-
terial in a short, intense period.
A series of words rotates on a
drum, and the idea is to memor-
ize the words and anticipate each
word before it comes around again
on the drum.
The "zombie test" is a similar
personality test offering a series
Waterman Talk
Dr. Leroy Waterman, professor
emeritus of Semitics, will speak
before the Unitarian Student
Group at 7 p.m. Sunday.
He will discuss "Motivations and
Achievements of the Revised Ver-
sion of the Bible."
WUE RTH
ONE OF LIFE'S HAPPIEST
EXPERIENCES
X Yo

of pictures of different types of,
people to be judged by the sub-
ject. He chooses the one he pre-
fers best.
The "box" apparatus was de-
monstrated on the tour through
the animal laboratory.
The laboratory assistant placed
a rat who was conditioned to the
response in a glass box. There
was a hurdle-like collapsible par-
tition in the middle of the box the
rat had to jump over within 15
seconds after he heard a buzzer
or else 50 mill-volts of electricity
shocked him.
Dr.kNorman F. Maier of the
psychology department has used
the elevated "Y maze" to prove
that animals can reason. Rats on
an elevated Y maze use external
stimuli in the room to turn either
right or left at the "y" in the
maze toward food.
Dogs 'Shake Hands'
The scientific way to teach your
dog how to "shake hands" was
also demonstrated on the labora-
tory tour. The dog was strapped
in a wooden stock for his. head
and cloth straps to brace his body
into position.
An electrical current was gene-
rated through the apparatus until
the dog learned to lift his paw the
right height to stop the current.
The human test most liable to
drive subjects insane was a record-
ing device which repeats the words
you say in a microphone two
tenthsaof a second aofter you say
them. The demonstrator remark-
ed that lecturers are the only sub-
jects who do well on the voice re-
peating test.
The fish laboratories, located in
the basement of Mason Hall stress
psysiological psychology - struc-
ture and function of the nervous
system. Experiments with fish bri
system. Experiments with fish
bring out principles of learning
which are applicable to human be-
havior.
"The purpose of the annual open
house," according to Dr. Justin M.
Aronfreed, open house chairman,
"is to give undergraduate psycho-
logy students a chance to see the
various equipment and techniques
they hear about in classes and lec-
tures.
"Previously," Dr. Aronfreed ex-
plained, "each class toured the
animal, fish, and human labora-
tories and watched the tests and
equipment. But now, with 31 sec-
tions of psychology 31, this is im-
possible, so we devote one day a
year for an open house."

Rome Rush
ROME ()-The Italian Road
Federation knew traffic is ter-
rific in Rome but needed sta-
tistics.
So it sent a test car through
the noon rush when Italians
go home for lunch and found
it took: 41 minutes to travel
just less than 7 miles, 137 gear
shifts, 166 brakings and 198
uses of the clutch.
Flint School
Admissions
Admission requirements for the
University's Flint College were ap-
approved by the Regents yester-
day.
Flint College will require at least
55 semester hours of acceptable
work completed in another col-
lege or university, the same re-
quirements as those for transfer-
ring to the University in the junior
year.
Also considered will be the quali-
ty and content of the student's
high school and college records.
Not more than 62 semester
hours may be transferred on ad-
mission from any two-year col-
lege, or 75 hours from any four-
year institution, or 90 hours from
any of the University's schools at
Ann Arbor.
Admission as a special student
will be possible for matui'e ap-
plicants who wish to pursue stu-
dies not leading to a degree.
Admission of special students
will be at the discretion of the
Flint College.
Story Series
Wins Award
The University Speech Depart-
ment, for the second consecutive
year, has been awarde'd a First
Award for the children's series,
"Down Story Book Lane."
The award was announced at the
Twentieth Annual Educational
Radio and Television Conference
which is being held this week at
Ohio State University.
"The Nicest Christmas Gift of
All," was the script that was cited
and was written by Bob Reinhart,
Grad. The series is supervised by
Dr. E. E. Willis, Associate Pro-
fessor of Speech, and was directed
by Don Strent, Grad.

Ann Arbor
Schools See
1 00th Year
In contrast to its five buildings
and enrollment of 1,700 students
in 1856, the Ann Arbor public
school system now includes 12
buildings and 7,600 students.
In its centennial year the pub-
lic school system has increased
from an estimated $140,000 value
to a system worth well over fif-
teen million dollars.
According to Jack Iszay, super-
intendent of schools, the present
system, which includes nine ele-
mentary schools, two junior high
schools and the new ultra-mod-
ern Ann Arbor High School, serves
the Ann Arbor area and one hun-
dred neighboring school districts.
These districts send from one to
100 students.
This program offers such courses
as painting, homemaking and car-
pentry to interested adults. A
special education course for the
mentally retarded is also included.
The system employs 370 certi-
fied teachers, with assistance from
approximately two hundred stu-
dent teachers from the University's
School of Education.
In addition to the faculty, the
system employs 130 non-profes-
sional employees, of which sixty
are custodians and the balance are
secretaries and administrative aids.
The pay scale ranges from $3,300
to $5,700 a year for teachers with
an A.B. degree. Faculty members
with a master's degree earn from
$3,500 to $6,100, while those hav-
ing a doctorate earn from $3,899
to $6,900.
Appointments
For Technic
Announced
The Michigan Technic has an-
nounced its new staff for the com-
ing year.
Re-appointed to their former
positions were, Sheldon Levin,
'57E, Editor-in-Chief; Jean Boch,
'57E, Business Manager; and
Howard Urow, '57E, Articles Ed-
itor.
New appointments are: Joseph
Santa, '57E, Associate Editor;
Sandy Milne, '58E, Managing Ed-
itor; Thomas Prunk, '57E, Fea-
tures Editor; Charles Fine, '58E,
Advertising Manager; Gary Muel-
ler, '58E, Circulation Manager;
Ray Homicz, '59E, Publicity Man-
ager; Donald Davidson, '59E, Pub-
lications Manager; Norma Bennis,
'57E, Art Editor; and Juris Sle-
sers, '58E, Illustrations Editor.
Petitions Open
Education school council has
extended the petitioning deadline
for senior class offices until Tues-
day.
Interested students may call
Joyce Lane, NO 2-3119, or pick
up petitions in the education school
lounge.
DIAL NO 2-3136

2

i;

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
PERSONAL
DEAR ZELDA,
To heck with my virtue, the New-
berry-Gomberg "SHOWBOAT" is one
booth I would never miss. We're here
for a liberal education, aren't we?
Eloise
)151F
"GABE." Meet Betsy Barbour and Allen
Rumsey at "JAZZ GOES TO HEAV-
EN." Irving. )149F"
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted tuxedos converted to
single-breasted, $18, or new silk shawl
collar, $25. Write to Michaels Tailor-
ing Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit, Michi-
gan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. )118F
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Theses, term papers, etc. Rea-
sonable rates, prompt service. 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )44J
RICHARD MADDY - VIOLINMAKER.
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )31J
New Atlas Tires
6.70x15, $15.95; 6.00x16, $13.95; 760x15,
$19.95 (exchange price plus tax)
Hickey's Service Station
Cor. N. Main & Catherine. NO 8-7717
k42J
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERINGS
205 N. Main 207 E. Washington
Headquarters in Ann Arbor for:
Armstrong linoleum and tile
NO 3-8321 NO 2-9418
Complete floor coverings shops
Mohawk and Bigelow carpets
Guaranteed installation or
"do-it-yourself."
363

USED CARS
CAD ILLAC 1953
Convertible, canary yellow, white top
only 6 mos. old. White wall tires, ra-
dio, heater, windshield washers, tinted
glass. All power equipment, except
for brakes. Good mechanical condi-
tion. $2,400. Phone NO 2-1589. )150N
1949 LINCOLN COSMOPOLITAN, radio,
heater, seat covers. Excellent shape.
Must sell. $275. NO 3-6400. ) 149N
1952 PLYMOUTH 4 door sedan, heater,
seat covers, excellent condition. NO
2-9853 evenings only. ) 138N
OUR LOW
OVERHEAD
saves you money!
50 new and used cars to choose from.
Come out today to the BIG NEW lot
at 3345 Washtenaw.
Fitzgerald
LINCOLN - MERCURY
Phone NO 3-4197
Open evenings till 8
1941 FORD Club coupe, good tires, no
rust, runs perfectly. $95.
1952 CHEVROLET 2-door, grey, real
clean and l',w mileage, $445.
1953 WILLYS hardtop, 2-tone paint, ra-
dio, neater, overdrive, 20,000 miles,
white-wall tires and like new, $745.
1920 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, radio,
heater, in excellent condition, $445.
Jim White Chevrolet, Inc.
Ashley at Liberty, First at Washington
Phone NO 2-5000 or NO 3-6495
1130N
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
MAKE MONEY SPARE TIME
7 to 10 hrs. weekly nets to $200.00 month.
Possibly full time work. Man ornwom-
an from this area to service new De
Lux Vending Mach. Route. One who
can qualify as to honesty and ability
will be interviewed locally. Car and
$600.00 cash investment necessary, ful-
ly secured. Write P.O. box 7047, Min-
neapolis 11, Minn. )198

FOR SALE
ELECTRIC ORGAN for responsible par-
ty, take over low monthly payments,
can be seen in this locality. Write
Credit Manager, box 5152, Southfield
Station, Det., Mich.
ROYAL Portable Typewriter, clean, good
condition, $35.00; Cole steel cabinet
with two letter-size file drawers, four
4x6 file drawers, storage space with
shelves, gray, $20.00. NO 3-0777. )179B
BOY'S full size middleweight bicycle,
red and white, goon condition. Call
NO 2-4119 from 3:30-8:00 P.M. )172B
HOUSE and extra lot for sale. Univer-
sity instructor has accepted new po-
sition, 3-bedroom completely modern,
basement tiled. Phone NO 8-8568.
)176B
ARMY. NAVY type oxfords-$6.88, sox
39c, shorts 69c, military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)123B
FOR RENT
4-ROOM APARTMENT, bath, study and
utility. Fireplace. Use of full base-
ment. Downtown location. $100.00 per
month. NO 5-5686 between 6 and 8
P.M. Also furniture bargains. )57C
APT. for married couple or women stu-
dents. Available May 1 to Sept. 1
Call NO 3-3463. )56C
5-ROOM FURNISHED apartment. For
adults, garage. June 15-Sept. 15. Call
after .6 P.M. NO 2-8361. )55C
SPORTS
Hi; Mr. & Mrs. Golfer
Visit Michigan's most -yell stocked Pro
shop. Anything and everything for the
golfer! Beginner's sets, 2 woods, 5
irons, nice bag, $79 value $57.50; shag
balls (repainted) $2 doz. Add to your
present set with some of my wide se-
lection of single clubs, woods, irons
and puttersautility clubs. Extra spe-
cial caddy carts $17.95.
BOB APPLEGATE'S
Golf & Gift Mart
Located at Municipal Golf Course
Phone NO 8-9230
)20S
MUNICIPAL GOLF COURSE now open
for. playing. 1519 Fuller Road. )21S
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Hamilton watch in vicinity of
2nd floor Angell Hall to Aud. B. Re-
ward. Phone 337 Mosher. )167A

HELP WANTED
BOOK STORE OFFICE
An exciting bookshop has an attractive
opening in its congenial small office.
Permanent, full-time, real possibilities
for promotion and regularly-scheduled
frequent pay raises. Hours can be ar-
ranged so applicant could handle one
or two University classes. General of-
fice experience preferred, good typ-
ing essential. Sales experience or li-
brary work also valuable. Opening
must be filled at once. Bob Marshall's
Book Shop. )111H
MIDDLE-AGED reliable man for per-
manent Janitor work, call NO 2-9020.
)114H
Time Study work
Part Time
Observe and study operations in a local
manufacturing plant. For appoint-
ment call NO 2-6545. )109H
Soles Representatives
Reliable, well established emopany, ex-
panding in Ann Arbor area--wants
two men. Average $7,000.00 to $10,-
000.00 per yr. Wonderful opportunity
for men selected. Complete training.
See Mr. Lynch, Rm. 4, Hotel Allenel.
Mon., Apr. 23rd. 10-8. )1068
YOUNG LADY for full time work at
soda fountain. No evenings or Sun-
days. Swift's Drug Store. 340 S. State,
NO 2-0534. )105N
STUDENT ORGANIZATION is interest-
ed, in finding a non-student woman
with business procedure to work aft-
ernoons from 3 to 5, and Sat. morn-
ings 9 to 12. Phone NO 2-5514 between
5 and 6 P.M. only. Ask for Fred Shel-
don. )98R
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part time.
Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann h-bor Yellow
and Checker Cab Company. Phone
NO 8-9382. )W0B
ROOMS FOR RENT
LARGE SINGLE ROOM. Male student
$7.50 week. 716 N. 5th Avenue. NO 3-
6957. t)4w
DOUBLE sleeping rooms for two men,
Phone NO 8-0565 or NO 3-0913. )38D

A

&

'41

#f

Read
Daily
Class ifijeds

x1

MATS. 50e

STARTING

4I

I

Organization
Notices

yODAY ' DIAL I#
TODAY1' ! a f NO 2-2513 EVES. & SU
80c
i)IL OUT.AT 100,000 FEET!"

JN.

I

Episcopal Student Foundation: Buf-
fet supper and talk by Mr. Arthur Carr
on "The Poems of Gerard Manley Hop-
kins," April 22, 5:45 p.m., Canterbury
House.
Graduate Party, tonight, 8:00 p.m.,
Canterbury House.
* s *
Hillel Foundation: Saturday morning
Sabbath service, 9:00 a.m., Hillel.
Sunday night Supper Club, 6:00 p.m.,
Hillel. A film will follow the supper,
"House in the Desert," at 7:30 p.m.
*, * *
Michigan Christian Fellowship: Dr.
Minor Stegenga, Trinity Reformed
Church, Holland, Michigan, will speak
on "It Christ Alive Ttoday, April 22,
4:00 p.m., Lane Hall.
Russky Kruzhok: Mr. David Levine
will speak on Dostoevskii, April 23, 8:00
p.m., International Center.
Student Religious Association: Folk
dancing at Lane Hall in the Recreation
Room, April 23, 7:30-10:00 p.m. In-
struction for every dance and beginners
are welcome.

I

r
,

Late Show
Tonight 11 P.M.

I

Cihena quild.
TODAY at 7 and 9
Sunday at 8 only
ALEC GUINNESS
in
THE DETECTIVE
Architecture Auditorium
50c

r'

ORPHEUM
NOW THRU SUNDAY
Showing from 1:30 P.M. -- 65c
Ha~ -J~J.I
THE MOST
BOOMEEXPOSURE
SINCE ADAM
AND EVEI

"Fine drama filmed with
realism and compassion.
Susan Hayward superb.
An immensely impressive
production."
--ROSE PELSWICK
N.Y. JOURNAL-AMERICAN

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NEXT WEEK

Department of Speech Presents Moliere's
THE MISANTHROPE
New English Verse Translation by Richard Wilbur
'WED., THURS., FRI. & SAT., APRIL 25, 26, 27 & 28 - 8:00 P.M.
II

11

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