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April 21, 1956 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-21

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MISS MEAD TOUCHES
SOFT SPOT
See Page 4

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Latest Deadline in the State

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CLOUDY, WARMER

QLIL AVA

VOTr T Vi_ Nw_' 1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 1956

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Regents Approve
Dorm Rent Raise
Fixed Policy To Keep Tuition,
Room Rates At Minimum-Hatcher
The University Board of Regents yesterday approved a $20 per
year raise in roomand boardrates for residence halls.
No formal vote was taken. Under the Regents' by-laws, no
vote is required. The increase was presented in the form of a request
by University President Harlan H. Hatcher. Since it was not dis-
approved, the raise will go into effect next fall.
The increase is to cover increases in salary, and wages for resi-
dence hall employes and three extra days of food service brought
by the revised academic calendar, which also goes into effect next fall.
The increase brings the rate for a double room to $770 for the
academic year. This compares with $380 for men and $400 for women
- in 1939-40 or an increase of 102

Reds Join
In Peace
Plan Search
LONDON (A) - Soviet Premier
4 Nikolai Bulganin and Communist
boss Nikita Khrushchev agreed
yesterday to join the British in a
search for a Middle East peace
plan.
The Kremlin leaders and Prime
Minister Anthony Eden ordered
their experts to submit proposals
for a United Nations program
aimed to avoid war between Arabs
and Israelis.
Diplomatic sources said Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower will
be kept informed.
The experts were ordered to re-
port by next Tuesday, diplomatic
sources said.
Prime Minister Eden was under-
stood to have told the Russians
that an Arab-Israeli conflict could
touch off an H-bomb war between
the Communist and Western
worlds.
Khrushchev told the British at1
a luncheon Thursday that Com-
munists .and capitalists, however
much they dislike each other, must
strive to maintain peace lest. H-
bomb warfare destroy both.
Three big Mideast problems im-
mediately faced Eden and his
guests:
1. Devising a system of ration-
ing the supply of Communist and
Western arms to the Arabs and
Israelis. Britain is understood to
have ready a plan whereby the
arms would be rationed by the
U.N.
2. How to block and turn back
any aggressor.
3. What to do about the Bagh-
dad 'Alliance of Britain, Turkey,
Iraq, Iran and Pakistan. The Rus-
sians regard the pact as a threat
to them and have demanded it
be disbanded.
World News
Roundup
. By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Rep. J. E. Moss
(R-Calif.) said yesterday congre -
sional hearings have shown "there
is ample justification for the com-
plaints of newsmen" that the gov-
ernment has tried to clamp down
on many types of legitimate in-
formation.
He told the annual meeting of
the American Society of Newspa-
per Editors that his House Gov-
ernment Information subcommit-
tee is working on legislation aimed
at excessive government secrecy.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Demo-
cratic high command, heading
into the presidential campaign in
near-desperate financial plight,
tapped Speaker Sam Rayburn yes-
terday to preside at the party's
National Convention next August.
The financial crisis facing the
party was the outstanding prob-
lem arising at the start of a two-
day strategy conference which
brought together Democratic lead-
ers from across the nation.
MILWAUKEE -Milwaukee bus
drivers voted yesterday to end the
strike which has tied up all pub-
lic transportation in the area for
eight days.
The membership of Division 998,
Street Railway and Motor Coach
Employes, Union, voted 1,293 to
368 to accept the same contract
nrnnosal which they rejected one

per cent for men and 92 per cent
for women.
During the same period salary
and wage rates for residence hall
employes have increased up to
190 per cent, operating supplies
about 95 per cent and construction
costs approximately 150 per cent.
Vice-President Wilbur K. Pier-
pont told the Regents that the
'University's rates were in the up-
per third among schools in the
Big Ten and at the top among
other state-operated schools in
Michigan.
'Provide More Services'
"But we provide more services
in our residence halls than the
others," Pierpoat added.
President Hatcher said it was
the University's "fixed policy to
keep tuition and room and board
rates at a minimum consistent
with sound operation."
Regent Paul K. Adams started
the discussion by 'asking if the
raise was really necessary. He said
he had noticed that students were
,objecting to the raise. He asked
if rates could be reduced by fin-
ancing residence halls construction
with bond issues of longer matur-
ity.
Vice-President Pierpont said that
investors were unwilling to buy
bonds of longer maturity than the
25 to 32 years for which current
issues have been floated.
Would Pay Off More
He added that student payments
would be paying off more inter-
est if maturities were lengthened.
He also questioned the conten-
tion that students are paying more
thanrtheir share and financing
future construction. He didn't
know how "their share" could be
determined, he said, and students
were receiving the benefit of past
payments and construction, some
of which was built as a result of
gifts.
In other action yesterday, the
Regents approved a loan contract
with the Housing and Home Fin-
ance Agency to float $3,300,000 in
bonds to finance another 300
Northwood apartments for married
students on the new North Cam-
pus. Under the contract, if the
bonds cannot be sold to the public,
the federal government will buy
them.
Hiss Invitation
PRINCETON, N. J. (P)-The
Princeton University Board of
Trustees announced yesterday they
disapproved the action of students
in inviting Alger Hiss, a convicted
perjurer, to speak on the campus
but they approved the decision of
the administration not to inter-
fere.
In a statement issued afterward,
the trustees said they had been
unanimous in their action express-
ing "disapproval of the action of
the students who have invited Al-
ger Hiss to speak on the campus."

Middle East~
Peace Seen
Progressing
'On Right Road':
Hannarskjold
JERUSALEM ()-Dag Ham-
marskjold wound up the second
week of his Middle East peace'
mission yesterday with the declar-
ation "I am sure we are on the
right road."
"Personally I don't see any rea-
son why we should lose it," the
United Nations secretary general
told newsmen after completing
four days of talks with Israeli
officials in Jerusalem.
Against a background of new
friction on the Jordan-Israeli
frontier, Hammarskjold took a
plane for his temporary headquar-
ters in Beirut, Lebanon. With con-
ferences in Egypt and Israel out
of the way, he expects to visit
Jordan and Syria next week.
Cease-Fire Accomplished
He opened the mission with his'
flight from New York April 6
under Security Council orders to
seek an easing of tension.
The Egyptian-Israeli cease-fire
agreement, ordered effective Wed-
nesday night, is the mission's big-
gest announced accomplishment.
Egypt charged Israel has vio-
lated that cease-fire agreement
both aground and in the air. Is-
raeli spokesmen denied it and UN
officials in Cairo described the
cases as "minor incidents of little
importance."
Egypt Accuses Israel
Emphasizing that Egypt was
abiding by the cease-fire, Egyp-
tian spokesmen declared Israeli
soldiers fired on a post in the
Gaza Strip Thursday and Israeli
planes' flew over the area yester-
day for the third straigt day.
While brushing off those accu-
sations, Israel presented a fresh
charge of trouble on the Jordan-
ian flank.
. A military spokesman said a
Jordanian group fired from inside
Israeli territory at an Israeli mili-
tary car in the Beith Gurvin area
of the Judean Hills last night. The1
Israelis fired back, he said, and3
suffered no casualties.
Carrilo
To Address
Class of '56
Nabor Carrillo, Rector of thel
University of Mexico, will be the l
University's commencement speak-;1
er at its 112th commencement thist
June.
Carrillo, the 45-year-old leader
of Mexico's national university, is1
reported to have made great pro-
gress in building up his institution1
and its faculty.
He has also been active in the
work of the Fund for Peaceful
Atomic Development, directed by
Dean E. Blythe Stason of the Law
School.
Carrillo has been on the Uni-
versity of Mexico's faculty sincee
1932. He has served as chief of
engineers of the National Com-
mission of Mexico in 1936 and as
investigator for the Co-Ordinat-l
ing and Organizing Commission of I
'Scientific Investigation in 1943.
He has a civil engineering degree

from his university as well as
ijaster of science and doctor of
science degrees from Harvard Uni-
versity.
Commencement exercises areJ
scheduled for 5:30 p.m., Saturday,
June 16, in the Michigan Stadium.

Salary, Wag
Given to

Staff,

P'y Raise

-Daily-John Hirtzei
CROWD CIRCULATES AT FIELDHOUSE-Thousands jammed Yost Fieldhouse last night for the first of two Michigras nights.

Increases

Faculty

Best Parade
Float Prizes
Announced
Amidst shrieks, background roar
and general chaos, the awards for
the prize floats were given out last
night at Yost Field House.
First prize went to Gamma Phi
Beta and Theta Xi for the float;
"Scheherezade." Alpha Omicron
Pi and Phi Sigma Kappa copped
second honors for "Babes in Toy-
land." Third place went to Alpha
Xi Delta and Theta Delta Chi for
"Tales of Hoffman."
Honorable Mention was given to
Sigma Delta Tau and Sigma Phi
Epsilon's "Gaite Pariesienne." Ann,
Arbor High placed first in the
band competition.
By 11 p.m. last night, carnival
patrons had already gone through
the Friday night supply of five
cent concession tickets and had
bought out two-thirds of Satur-
day's supply, buying 250,000 of
them. Michigras officials hope
to replenish their supply in De-
troit,eaccording to co-ticket chair-
man Joanne Marsh.
The pre-sale of 50 cent admis-
sion tickets tripled last year's pre-
sale, and gate receipts are still
coming in. The number of ad-
mission tickets sold before the
Carnival even opened totalled
4,100.
Between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. to-
morrow, Michigras will open its
rides to the children of Ann Ar-
bor (ages six to sixteen) during
the special Kiddy Carnival. From
7 p.m. to 1 a.m. tomorrow booths
and rides will again be open in the
final session of the Michigras
week-end.
University President H a r 1 a n
Hatcher will present the awards
for the best entries in the show,
refreshments and skill categories
during the evening.

Parade Viewers Climb
Hydrants, Trees, Roofs
By PETE ECKSTEIN
They stuck their-heads out office windows; they closed their
stores and stood on the sidewalk outside; they climbed on painters'
scaffolds and Good Humor trucks; they stood on the top of the Ad-
ministration Building and theater marquees; they balanced on step-
ladders and fire hydrants; they put the roof of a Union construction
shack to the test-and it flunked.
They were coeds with Bermuda shorts shivering under slickers;
they were townspeople holding up children, or bolding them back;'
they were foreign students in beards and turbans; they were waiters
with their noses against the windows of empty restaurants-and
they all seemed to be carrying

Fieldhouse
Tour Offers
'Abs', Roars

The following is
mate stenographic
sounds heard in and
Fieldhouse.
GENERAL ROAR
GROUND.

an approxi-
record of
around Yost
IN BACK-

Republicans
Challenge Soil
Bank Approval
WASHINGTON (A'-Republicans
on the House Appropriations Com-
mittee took a second look yester-
day at the $1,200,000,000 soil bank
appropriation approved' by the
committee Thursday - and then
raised the roof.
They challen'ged the committee's
legislative authority to vote the
money, stated that no more than
250 million dollars worth of it
could be used for anything but
preventing soil erosion, and de-
clared only a limited acreage could
be taken out of production before
the appropriation expires Dec. 31.
The committee approved the
fund 36-7 Thursday as an emer-
gency measure to launch President
Eisenhower's plan to pay farmers
for withdrawing some of their land
from the production of crops.
Chairman Clarence Cannon (D-
Mo.) reported that only one Demo-
crat and six of the 20 Republicans
on the committee voted against the
appropriation, although all the Re-
publicans were opposed to a re-
port which accompanied the bill.

cameras.
They began congregating around
3 p.m., forming first one row along
the street and then another row
pressed close behind. For 45 min-
utes or so they talked, sometimes
quite intensely, about anything but
the coming parade: "I'm sorry you
didn't come to my party last
night," "What did the Tigers do?"
But that was soon over. The
music grew louder, the crowd grew
thicker, and the tots jumped
around faster. "Here comes the
band," a beaming parent informed
his small son.
As the lead cars and marching
bands came by, shutters began
clicking. "I got Michiclef, any-
way," a high-school girl sighed.
Enthusiasm waned as Michigras
bigwigs and judges rolled by in
convertibles. "Who are they any-
way?" asked one adolescent.
"Ma, ma, here comes Michi-
mouse," several people swear they
heard one tot exclaim as Mickey
and Minnie Mouse came rolling
and revolving by. She jumped,
clapped her hands, and jumped
some more.
A horse-drawn chuck wagon
passed, followed by a now-reluc-
tant, now-overanxious jackass, and
one boy barked his head off while
See ALL, Page 5

"Look at that line!"
"Are all these people waiting
to buy tickets?"
"Ouch."
"Excuse me."
"How much?"
"Fifty cents?"
ROAR INCREASES, has musi-
cal overtones.
"I'd like to go on the merry-go-
round. That's all I like."
"AHHHHHHH. AHHHHHH"
"That 'Tiltawhirl' looks scary."
"HOT DOGS? ICE COLD POP?"
"Let's go inside."
ROAR INCREASES, loses musi-
cal overtones.
"STEP RIGHT UP. EVERY-
BODY WINS. EVERYBODY
WINS."
"Ouch."
"Sorry.~
"THROW A PIE. COME ON
AND TEST YOUR SKILL."
'COME ON UP. IT'S FREE ...
Three tickets for cokes, five for
hot dogs."
"Excuse me."
"Whose glove is this?"
ROAR INCREASES.
"YOU DON'T HAVE TO RING
THE LEG. ALL YOU HAVE TO
DO IS HIT ONE."
"Hey!"
"Excuse me."
"FOUR IN A ROW AND YOU
WIN A GIRL FOR HALF AN
HOUR."
"Oh. I'm sorry."
"THERE IS NO SMOKING IN
THE FIELDHOUSE. NO SMOK-
ING, PLEASE."
"My gosh, things are jammed
in here."
"HARLAN HATCHER WON
BACK EVERYTHING HE LOST
HERE. COME ON IN AND WIN
A PILE OF MONEY."
"He must be trying to impress
his girl."
"AND, LADIES, O N L Y 25
CENTS."
"Excuse me."
"THEY'RE RUSHING DOWN
THERE! EVERYBODY'S PLAY-
ING THE GAME."
ROAR DIMINISHED SLIGHT-
LY, became more musical.
"HOT DOGS? ICE COLD POP?"
"Excuse me."
"AAAAHHHHHHH. AHHHH."
"Tickets are 50 cents."
"I'm kinda glad it only happens
everv nther vear."

Retroactive
To Feb. 1st
Appropriation
To Cover Costs
By JIM DYGERT
Daily City Editor
The University faculty and staff
will receive salary or wage in-
creases from four to ten per cent
retroactive to Feb. 1, 1956, the
Board of Regents passed at its
April meeting yesterday.
Also at the meeting, the Regents
authorized the preparation of
three budgets for the 1956-57 year,
including a General Funds budget
of $34,802,700, the highest in Uni-
versity history.
The pay raise amounts to six per
cent of the total payroll and was
made possible by action of the
State Legislature and the gover-
nor authorizing $658,000 for the
purpose.
Follows Civil Service
The University will follow the
Michigan Civil Service adjust-
ments, so far as the schedules
apply, in making non-academic
increases. Academic salaries will
be adjusted on a straight basis
of six per cent.
Salary checks for the Increases
will be issued about May 20 for
the months of February, March
and April. May and June checks.
will reflect the increases for those
months. Merit or promotion in-
creases will be considered in the
new 1956-57 budget.
Appropriation of $27,500,000
To finance the budget there will
be a Legislative appropriation of
$27,500,000 and an anticipated
revenue from student fees and re-
lated sources of $7,302,700.
Enrollment is expected to be
22,300, an all-time record.
It was pointed out at the Reg-
ents' meeting that only five years
ago the University received only
$13,000,000, less than half the
present appropriation, from the
Legislature.
The Regents approved the bud-
get recommendations of the Uni-
versity's Committee on Budget Ad
ministration with the understand-
ing that the completed budgets
would be submitted ior approval
at the June meeting of the Reg-
ents.
The other two budget recom-
mendations approved were:
A budget of $316,250 for the
Flint branch of the University
based on an estimated enrollment
of 300 and a Legislative approp-
riation of $275,000 and student
fees and related income of $31,250.
Preparation of a budget of $300,-
000 for Research and Service in
the Utilization of Human Re-
sources.
Regents Make
Appointments
University Regents yesterday
made 17 appointments and approv-
ed 21 leaves of absences and three
retirements.
Permission was given three pro-
fessors to retire at the age of 65
instead of the mandatory 70-year-
old age.
Prof. Arthur L. Dunham, of the
history department, will retire at
the end of the first semester of
the 1956-57 year.
Associate Prof. B. A. Soule, of
the chemistry department, will
leave at the end of this semester,
and Engineering Prof. O. W. Bos-
ton will retire in July.
Of the 17 appointments approv-
ed yesterday, eight concern facul-

ty members of the College of Lit-
erature, Science and the Arts.
Geography Chairman
Prof. Charles M. Davis was ap-
pointed chairman of the geogra-
phy department for a three-year
term beginning at the end of this
semester.
Prof. Shorey Peterson was made
acting chairman of the economics

I

'POGO IS SWEET, WITH MOLASSES INSIDE':
Walt Kelly Lectures at Press Convention

By RENE GNAM j "The whole thing is kind of a Schools attending the conven-
'Search for Bridey Murphy'," Kelly tion entered contestants in the
Over 1,76Q high school journal- declared, annual Donal Hamilton Haines
ists jammed Rackham Auditorium Kelly illustrated his lecture with Memorial Awards speech report-
yesterday to hear Walt Kelly ad- ~ several drawings of his comic strip ing contest.
dress the 29th annual Michigan characters. Contestants were required to
Interscholastic Press Association charogorshe said "is something writesnews reports of the Kelly
onvention, sweet, with molasses inside." lecture.
It was the largest MIPA attend- In the second main address of These reports were judged by
ance in history. the convention, Prof. Kent W. members of the sponsoring pro- }
Kelly, creator of the comic strip Leach of the education school fessional journalistic fraternity,;
"Pogo," advised attending stu- said words in newspapers "should Rirma Teta Chi and Professors

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